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Seán Ó Nualláin [4]Seán O. Nualláin [4]
  1. Sean O. Nuallain (2012). God's Unlikely Comeback: Evolution, Emanation, and Ecology. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 8 (1):339-382.
    Normal 0 false false false EN-AU X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} This paper has three contrasting sections. The first starts with a description of the academic context that has led researchers like Stewart Kauffmann to introduce "God" into respectable discourse. It then goes on to juxtapose his schema with (...)
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  2. Seán O. Nualláin & Tom Doris (2012). Consciousness is Cheap, Even If Symbols Are Expensive; Metabolism and the Brain's Dark Energy. Biosemiotics 5 (2):193-210.
    Use of symbols, the key to the biosemiotics field as to many others, required bigger brains which implied a promissory note for greater energy consumption; symbols are obviously expensive. A score years before the current estimate of 18–20% for the human brain’s metabolic demand on the organism, it was known that neural tissue is metabolically dear. This paper first discusses two evolutionary responses to this demand, on both of which there is some consensus. The first, assigning care of altricial infants (...)
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  3. Seán Ó Nualláin (2010). Ask Not What You Can Do for Yourself: Cartesian Chaos, Neural Dynamics, and Immunological Cognition. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 3 (1):79-92.
    This paper focuses on the disparate phenomena we psychologize as “selfhood”. A central argument is that, far from being a deus ex machina as required in the Cartesian schema, our felt experience of self is above all a consequence of data compression. In coming to this conclusion, it considers in turn the Cartesian epiphany, other traditional and contemporary perspectives, and a half-century’s empirical work in the Freeman lab on neurodynamics. We introduce the concept of consciousness qua process as a force.
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  4. Seán Ó Nualláin (2008). Subjects and Objects: Metaphysics, Biology, Consciousness, and Cognition. Biosemiotics 1 (2):239-251.
    Over the past half-century, the Freeman laboratory has accumulated a large volume of data and a correspondingly extensive interpretive framework centered around an alternative perspective on brain function, that of dynamical systems. The purpose of this paper is first briefly to summarise this work, and bring it into dialogue with other perspectives. The contents of consciousness are seen as an inevitably sparse sample of events in the perception–action cycle. The paper proceeds to an attempt to elucidate the contents of this (...)
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  5. Seán Ó Nualláin (1997). Part I: Cognitive Science in Crisis? Cognition and Mind. In S. O'Nuillain, Paul McKevitt & E. MacAogain (eds.), Two Sciences of Mind. John Benjamins. 9--5.
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  6. Seán Ó Nualláin (1997). Part III: Consciousness and Selfhood. In S. O'Nuillain, Paul McKevitt & E. MacAogain (eds.), Two Sciences of Mind. John Benjamins. 9--283.
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  7. Sean O. Nualláin (1997). Part II: Epistemology and Methodology. In S. O'Nuillain, Paul McKevitt & E. MacAogain (eds.), Two Sciences of Mind. John Benjamins. 9--133.
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  8. Seán Ó Nualláin (1994). Some Consequences of Current Scientific Treatments of Consciousness and Selfhood. AI and Society 8 (4):305-314.