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Sean D. Kirkland [14]Sean Daniel Kirkland [1]
  1. Sean D. Kirkland (2013). Heidegger and Greek Philosophy. In Francois Raffoul & Eric S. Nelson (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Heidegger. Bloomsbury 77.
     
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  2. Sean D. Kirkland (ed.) (2012). The Nature Drawings of Peter Karklins. Depaul Art Museum.
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  3. Sean D. Kirkland (2012). The Ontology of Socratic Questioning in Plato's Early Dialogues. State University of New York Press.
    A provocative close reading revealing a radical, proto-phenomenological Socrates.
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  4. Sean D. Kirkland (2011). Nietzsche and Drawing Near to the Personalities of the Pre-Platonic Greeks. Continental Philosophy Review 44 (4):417-437.
    This essay focuses on and attempts to uncover the truly radical character of Nietzsche’s early “philological” work, specifically asking after the benefit he claims the study of classical culture should have for our present, late-modern historical moment. Taking up his study of the Pre-Platonic thinkers in 1873’s Philosophie im tragischen Zeitalter der Griechen , the first section analyzes Nietzsche’s statement that history’s principle task is the uncovering of Persönlichkeiten . I argue that it is not at all the subjective character (...)
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  5. Sean D. Kirkland (2010). Speed and Tragedy in Cocteau and Sophocles. In S. E. Wilmer & Audrone Zukauskaite (eds.), Interrogating Antigone in Postmodern Philosophy and Criticism. OUP Oxford 313.
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  6. Sean D. Kirkland (2010). Walter A. Brogan: Heidegger and Aristotle: The Twofoldness of Being. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 43 (2):287-292.
  7. Sean D. Kirkland (2009). Aristotle on the Common Sense. Ancient Philosophy 29 (2):438-441.
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  8. Sean D. Kirkland (2009). The Tragic Foundation of Aristotelian Ethics. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 30 (2):239-260.
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  9. Sean D. Kirkland (2007). Logos as the Message From the Gods: On the Etymology of Hermes in Plato's Cratylus. Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 12 (1):1 - 14.
    In the Cratylus, Socrates seems to present the Logos essentially as an always already present yoke binding us to our world. However, this prior and necessary bond does not entail that the world is revealed perfectly and completely in the terms and structures of our human language. Rather, within this bond, the Logos opens up a distance between being and appearance, insofar as it points to »what is« as the withdrawn possibility condition for the appearances ordered, gathered and separated according (...)
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  10. Sean D. Kirkland (2007). On Anti-Parmenidean Temporality in Aristotle's Physics. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (1):49-62.
    Taking very seriously its anti-Parmenidean character, this essay locates a radically temporalized ontology at the heart of Aristotle’s Physics. We first concentrateon Aristotle’s discussion of kinêsis or ‘change’ as always between opposites, drawing the conclusion that the archai that govern and constitute a change, as opposites, cannot be present in the change itself. Thus, change is what it is by virtue of what is necessarily not present. We then draw the implications of this discussion for chronos or ‘time,’ defined in (...)
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  11. Sean D. Kirkland (2007). Thinking in the Between with Heidegger and Plato. Research in Phenomenology 37 (1):95-111.
    In this essay, I attempt first to clarify what non-metaphysical thinking as a thinking "in the Between" might mean for Heidegger, as presented in his Beiträge zur Philosophie . After determining this as the proper response to the self-concealment Heidegger sees as grounding the appearing of beings, I then attempt to show that the elenctic method of Socrates in Plato's early dialogues exhibits something like the same dynamic. That is, Socrates attempts to situate himself and his interlocutors in a space (...)
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  12. Sean D. Kirkland (2007). The Temporality of Phronêsis in the Nicomachean Ethics. Ancient Philosophy 27 (1):127-140.
  13. Sean D. Kirkland (2006). The Blackwell Guide to Ancient Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy 29 (1):65-70.
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  14. Sean D. Kirkland (2004). Socrates Contra Scientiam, Pro Fabula. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (2):313-332.
    In the Phaedrus, Plato’s Socrates distinguishes himself from the natural scientists of his day and indicates that the true philosophical attitude, the love of realhuman wisdom, shares something essential with the mythical attitude. In the following essay, I argue that Socrates criticizes science here for its failure to attend to aporia, to recognize an essentially questionworthy aspect of the world of human experience, an aspect I will refer to as distance. Furthermore, I argue that Socrates aligns his own philosophical activity (...)
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