Search results for 'Sean Drysdale Walsh' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sean Drysdale Walsh (2011). Maximality, Duplication, and Intrinsic Value. Ratio 24 (3):311-325.score: 870.0
    In this paper, I develop an argument for the thesis that ‘maximality is extrinsic’, on which a whole physical object is not a whole of its kind in virtue of its intrinsic properties. Theodore Sider has a number of arguments that depend on his own simple argument that maximality is extrinsic. However, Peter van Inwagen has an argument in defence of his Duplication Principle that, I will argue, can be extended to show that Sider's simple argument fails. However, van Inwagen's (...)
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  2. Sean Drysdale Walsh (2012). Kant's Theory of Right as Aristotelian Phronesis. International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (2):227-246.score: 870.0
    Many philosophers believe that a moral theory, given all the relevant facts, should be able to determine what is morally right and wrong. It is commonly argued that Aristotle’s ethical theory suffers from a fatal flaw: it places responsibility for determining right and wrong with the virtuous agent who has phronesis rather than with the theory itself. It is also commonly argued that Immanuel Kant’s ethical theory does provide a concept of right that is capable of determining right and wrong (...)
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  3. Sean Walsh (2014). Logicism, Interpretability, and Knowledge of Arithmetic. Review of Symbolic Logic 7 (1):84-119.score: 240.0
    A crucial part of the contemporary interest in logicism in the philosophy of mathematics resides in its idea that arithmetical knowledge may be based on logical knowledge. Here an implementation of this idea is considered that holds that knowledge of arithmetical principles may be based on two things: (i) knowledge of logical principles and (ii) knowledge that the arithmetical principles are representable in the logical principles. The notions of representation considered here are related to theory-based and structure-based notions of representation (...)
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  4. Sean Walsh (2012). Comparing Peano Arithmetic, Basic Law V, and Hume's Principle. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 163 (11):1679-1709.score: 240.0
    This paper presents new constructions of models of Hume's Principle and Basic Law V with restricted amounts of comprehension. The techniques used in these constructions are drawn from hyperarithmetic theory and the model theory of fields, and formalizing these techniques within various subsystems of second-order Peano arithmetic allows one to put upper and lower bounds on the interpretability strength of these theories and hence to compare these theories to the canonical subsystems of second-order arithmetic. The main results of this paper (...)
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  5. Sean Walsh (2012). Modal Mereology and Modal Supervenience. Philosophical Studies 159 (1):1-20.score: 240.0
    David Lewis insists that restrictivist composition must be motivated by and occur due to some intuitive desiderata for a relation R among parts that compose wholes, and insists that a restrictivist’s relation R must be vague. Peter van Inwagen agrees. In this paper, I argue that restrictivists need not use such examples of relation R as a criterion for composition, and any restrictivist should reject a number of related mereological theses. This paper critiques Lewis and van Inwagen (and others) on (...)
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  6. Sean Walsh (2014). Empiricism, Probability, and Knowledge of Arithmetic. Journal of Applied Logic 12 (3):319–348.score: 240.0
    The topic of this paper is our knowledge of the natural numbers, and in particular, our knowledge of the basic axioms for the natural numbers, namely the Peano axioms. The thesis defended in this paper is that knowledge of these axioms may be gained by recourse to judgements of probability. While considerations of probability have come to the forefront in recent epistemology, it seems safe to say that the thesis defended here is heterodox from the vantage point of traditional philosophy (...)
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  7. Sean Walsh (2007). Incongruent Counterparts and Causality. Kant-Studien 98 (4):418-430.score: 240.0
    Two puzzles with regard to the Kritik der reinen Vernunft (KrV) are incongruent counterparts and causality. In De mundi sensibilis atque intelligibilis forma et principiis (MSI), Kant indicates that the experience of things like left and right hands, so-called incongruent counterparts, involve certain pure intuitions, and hence constitute one line of evidence for the claim that the concept of space itself is a pure intuition. In KrV, Kant again argues that the concept of space itself is a pure intuition, but (...)
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  8. Sean P. Walsh (2008). Review of Jens Timmermann, Kant's Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals: A Commentary. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (4).score: 240.0
  9. Sean Walsh, Eleanor Knox & Adam Caulton (2014). Critical Review of Mathematics and Scientific Representation. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 81 (3):460-469.score: 240.0
  10. Sean Walsh (2012). Mencius' Jun-Zi, Aristotle's Megalopsuchos, & Moral Demands to Help the Global Poor. Comparative Philosophy 4 (1).score: 240.0
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Normal 0 false false false EN-US ZH-TW X-NONE It is commonly believed that impartial utilitarian moral theories have significant demands that we help the global poor, and that the partial virtue ethics of Mencius and Aristotle do not. This ethical partiality found in these virtue ethicists has been criticized, and some have suggested that the partialistic virtue ethics of Mencius and Aristotle are parochial (i.e., overly narrow in their scope of concern). I (...)
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  11. Shannon Drysdale Walsh (2009). Engendering Justice: Constructing Institutions to Address Violence Against Women. Studies in Social Justice 2 (1):48-66.score: 240.0
    This paper addresses how states improve their responsiveness to violence against women in developing countries with little political will and few resources to do so. One key to engendering justice and improving responsiveness is building specialized institutions within the state that facilitate the implementation of laws addressing violence against women. Why and how do states engage in institution-building to protect marginalized populations in these contexts? I propose that developing countries are more likely to create and maintain specialized institutions when domestic (...)
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  12. Sean Noah Walsh (2012). Perversion and the Art of Persecution: Esotericism and Fear in the Political Philosophy of Leo Strauss. Lexington Books.score: 240.0
    This book critically examines Leo Strauss s claim that the philosophers of antiquity, especially Plato, wrote esoterically, hiding the highest truths exclusively between the lines.
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  13. Sean Noah Walsh (2013). Counterrevolution and Repression in the Politics of Education: At the Midnight of Dissent. Lexington Books.score: 240.0
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  14. Shannon Drysdale Walsh (2009). Engendering Social Justice: Strengthening State Responses to Violence Against Women in Central America. Studies in Social Justice 2 (1).score: 240.0
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  15. C. V. Drysdale (1929). Dr. Drysdale Replies. The Eugenics Review 20 (4):303.score: 180.0
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  16. John G. Slater & Frederick Michael Walsh (eds.) (2008). A Hundred Years of Philosophy From the Slater & Walsh Collections: Exhibition and Catalogue. Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto.score: 180.0
     
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  17. Frederick Michael Walsh (ed.) (2004). Philosophy & Bibliophily: An Exhibition Introducing the Walsh Philosophy Collection: The Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto, 26 January-30 April 2004. [REVIEW] University of Toronto.score: 180.0
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  18. A. Walsh (1998). Walsh, V.-Rationality, Allocation, and Reproduction. Philosophical Books 39:271-272.score: 180.0
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  19. Denis M. Walsh (2010). Not a Sure Thing: Fitness, Probability, and Causation. Philosophy of Science 77 (2):147-171.score: 60.0
    In evolutionary biology changes in population structure are explained by citing trait fitness distribution. I distinguish three interpretations of fitness explanations—the Two‐Factor Model, the Single‐Factor Model, and the Statistical Interpretation—and argue for the last of these. These interpretations differ in their degrees of causal commitment. The first two hold that trait fitness distribution causes population change. Trait fitness explanations, according to these interpretations, are causal explanations. The last maintains that trait fitness distribution correlates with population change but does not cause (...)
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  20. Sylvia Walsh (2008). Kierkegaard: Thinking Christianly in an Existential Mode. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Sylvia Walsh explores Kierkegaard's understanding of Christianity and the existential mode of thinking theologically appropriate to it in the context of the ...
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  21. Bill Walsh (2009). The Score Takes Care of Itself: My Philosophy of Leadership. Portfolio.score: 60.0
    The last lecture on leadership by the NFL's greatest coach: Bill Walsh Bill Walsh is a towering figure in the history of the NFL.
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  22. George V. Walsh (2000). Ayn Rand and the Metaphysics of Kant. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 2 (1):69 - 103.score: 60.0
    George V. Walsh examines the differences and similarities between Immanuel Kant and Ayn Rand in the area of metaphysics. He presents Kant's premises and conclusions on the major issues and provides a detailed discussion of Rand's criticisms of Kant. Walsh argues that Rand has seriously misread Kant on several points. Her interpretation—that Kant saw our sensory grasp of the world as "delusion," rather than knowledge—resembles that of Arthur Schopenhauer, except that the latter declares Kant's doctrine worthy of praise (...)
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  23. Sylvia Walsh (2005). Living Christianly: Kierkegaard's Dialectic of Christian Existence. Penn State University Press.score: 60.0
    In this book Sylvia Walsh focuses on the writings of this later period and locates the key to Kierkegaard's understanding of Christianity in the "inverse dialectic" that is involved in "living Christianly.
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  24. David Walsh (2008). The Modern Philosophical Revolution: The Luminosity of Existence. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    The Modern Philosophical Revolution breaks new ground by demonstrating the continuity of European philosophy from Kant to Derrida. Much of the literature on European philosophy has emphasized the breaks that have occurred in the course of two centuries of thinking. But as David Walsh argues, such a reading overlooks the extent to which Kant, Hegel, and Schelling were already engaged in the turn toward existence as the only viable mode of philosophizing. Where many similar studies summarize individual thinkers, this (...)
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  25. Stanislas Dehaene, Roi Cohen Kadosh & Vincent Walsh (2009). The Case for a Notation-Independent Representation of Number. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3):333.score: 60.0
    Cohen Kadosh & Walsh (CK&W) neglect the solid empirical evidence for a convergence of notation-specific representations onto a shared representation of numerical magnitude. Subliminal priming reveals cross-notation and cross-modality effects, contrary to CK&W's prediction that automatic activation is modality and notation-specific. Notation effects may, however, emerge in the precision, speed, automaticity, and means by which the central magnitude representation is accessed.
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  26. Miriam Rosenberg-Lee, Jessica M. Tsang, Vinod Menon, Roi Cohen Kadosh & Vincent Walsh (2009). Symbolic, Numeric, and Magnitude Representations in the Parietal Cortex. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3):350.score: 60.0
    We concur with Cohen Kadosh & Walsh (CK&W) that representation of numbers in the parietal cortex is format dependent. In addition, we suggest that all formats do not automatically, and equally, access analog magnitude representation in the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). Understanding how development, learning, and context lead to differential access of analog magnitude representation is a key question for future research.
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  27. Hilary Putnam & Vivian Walsh (2007). A Response to Dasgupta. Economics and Philosophy 23 (3):359-364.score: 30.0
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  28. Denis M. Walsh (2006). Evolutionary Essentialism. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (2):425-448.score: 30.0
    According to Aristotelian essentialism, the nature of an organism is constituted of a particular goal-directed disposition to produce an organism typical of its kind. This paper argues—against the prevailing orthodoxy—that essentialism of this sort is indispensable to evolutionary biology. The most powerful anti-essentialist arguments purport to show that the natures of organisms play no explanatory role in modern synthesis biology. I argue that recent evolutionary developmental biology provides compelling evidence to the contrary. Developmental biology shows that one must appeal to (...)
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  29. Denis M. Walsh, Andre Ariew & Tim Lewens (2002). The Trials of Life: Natural Selection and Random Drift. Philosophy of Science 69 (3):452-473.score: 30.0
    We distinguish dynamical and statistical interpretations of evolutionary theory. We argue that only the statistical interpretation preserves the presumed relation between natural selection and drift. On these grounds we claim that the dynamical conception of evolutionary theory as a theory of forces is mistaken. Selection and drift are not forces. Nor do selection and drift explanations appeal to the (sub-population-level) causes of population level change. Instead they explain by appeal to the statistical structure of populations. We briefly discuss the implications (...)
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  30. Roger Walsh (2005). Can Synaesthesia Be Cultivated?: Indications From Surveys of Meditators. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (s 4-5):5-17.score: 30.0
    Synaesthesia is considered a rare perceptual capacity, and one that is not capable of cultivation. However, meditators report the experience quite commonly, and in questionnaire surveys, respondents claimed to experience synaesthesia in 35% of meditation retreatants, in 63% of a group of regular meditators, and in 86% of advanced teachers. These rates were significantly higher than in nonmeditator controls, and displayed significant correlations with measures of amount of meditation experience. A review of ancient texts found reports suggestive of synaesthesia in (...)
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  31. Denis M. Walsh (2007). The Pomp of Superfluous Causes: The Interpretation of Evolutionary Theory. Philosophy of Science 74 (3):281-303.score: 30.0
    There are two competing interpretations of the modern synthesis theory of evolution: the dynamical (also know as ‘traditional’) and the statistical. The dynamical interpretation maintains that explanations offered under the auspices of the modern synthesis theory articulate the causes of evolution. It interprets selection and drift as causes of population change. The statistical interpretation holds that modern synthesis explanations merely cite the statistical structure of populations. This paper offers a defense of statisticalism. It argues that a change in trait frequencies (...)
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  32. J. A. Burgess & Adrian Walsh (1998). Is Genetic Engineering Wrong, Per Se? Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (3):393-406.score: 30.0
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  33. Mole Christopher & Dorrance Kelly Sean (2006). On the Demonstration of Blindsight in Monkeys. Mind Language 21 (4):475-483.score: 30.0
    : The work of Alan Cowey and Petra Stoerig is often taken to have shown that, following lesions analogous to those that cause blindsight in humans, there is blindsight in monkeys. The present paper reveals a problem in Cowey and Stoerig ’ s case for blindsight in monkeys. The problem is that Cowey and Stoerig ’ s results would only provide good evidence for blindsight if there is no difference between their two experimental paradigms with regard to the sorts of (...)
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  34. Adrian Walsh (2011). A Moderate Defence of the Use of Thought Experiments in Applied Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (4):467-481.score: 30.0
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  35. Arthur Hyman & James J. Walsh (eds.) (1973/1983). Philosophy in the Middle Ages: The Christian, Islamic, and Jewish Traditions. Hackett Pub. Co..score: 30.0
    Introduction The editors of this volume hope that it will prove useful for the study of philosophy in the Middle Ages by virtue of the comprehensiveness of ...
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  36. D. M. Walsh (1998). The Scope of Selection: Sober and Neander on What Natural Selection Explains. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 76 (2):250 – 264.score: 30.0
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  37. Denis M. Walsh (2003). Fit and Diversity: Explaining Adaptive Evolution. Philosophy of Science 70 (2):280-301.score: 30.0
    According to a prominent view of evolutionary theory, natural selection and the processes of development compete for explanatory relevance. Natural selection theory explains the evolution of biological form insofar as it is adaptive. Development is relevant to the explanation of form only insofar as it constrains the adaptation-promoting effects of selection. I argue that this view of evolutionary theory is erroneous. I outline an alternative, according to which natural selection explains adaptive evolution by appeal to the statistical structure of populations, (...)
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  38. D. M. Walsh (1996). Fitness and Function. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (4):553-574.score: 30.0
    According to historical theories of biological function, a trait's function is determined by natural selection in the past. I argue that, in addition to historical functions, ahistorical functions ought to be recognized. I propose a theory of biological function which accommodates both. The function of a trait is the way it contributes to fitness and fitness can only be determined relative to a selective regime. Therefore, the function of a trait can only be specified relative to a selective regime. Apart (...)
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  39. Steve Clarke & Adrian Walsh (2009). Scientific Imperialism and the Proper Relations Between the Sciences. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 23 (2):195 – 207.score: 30.0
    John Dupr argues that 'scientific imperialism' can result in 'misguided' science being considered acceptable. 'Misguided' is an explicitly normative term and the use of the pejorative 'imperialistic' is implicitly normative. However, Dupr has not justified the normative dimension of his critique. We identify two ways in which it might be justified. It might be justified if colonisation prevents a discipline from progressing in ways that it might otherwise progress. It might also be justified if colonisation prevents the expression of important (...)
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  40. Clare R. Walsh & Steven A. Sloman (2011). The Meaning of Cause and Prevent: The Role of Causal Mechanism. Mind and Language 26 (1):21-52.score: 30.0
    How do people understand questions about cause and prevent? Some theories propose that people affirm that A causes B if A's occurrence makes a difference to B's occurrence in one way or another. Other theories propose that A causes B if some quantity or symbol gets passed in some way from A to B. The aim of our studies is to compare these theories' ability to explain judgements of causation and prevention. We describe six experiments that compare judgements for causal (...)
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  41. Denis M. Walsh & André Ariew (1996). A Taxonomy of Functions. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (4):493 - 514.score: 30.0
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  42. Tony Lynch & A. J. Walsh (2000). The Good Mercenary? Journal of Political Philosophy 8 (2):133–153.score: 30.0
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  43. Adrian Walsh (2010). What is Analytic Philosophy? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (4):734-737.score: 30.0
    Analytic philosophy is roughly a hundred years old, and it is now the dominant force within Western philosophy. Interest in its historical development is increasing, but there has hitherto been no sustained attempt to elucidate what it currently amounts to, and how it differs from so-called 'continental' philosophy. In this rich and wide-ranging book, Hans Johann Glock argues that analytic philosophy is a loose movement held together both by ties of influence and by various 'family resemblances'. He considers the pros (...)
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  44. Kate Padgett Walsh (2010). Abortion: Rights, Responsibilities, Obligations. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):63-64.score: 30.0
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  45. D. M. Walsh (2004). Bookkeeping or Metaphysics? The Units of Selection Debate. Synthese 138 (3):337 - 361.score: 30.0
    The Units of Selection debate is a dispute about the causes of population change. I argue that it is generated by a particular `dynamical'' interpretation of natural selection theory, according to which natural selection causes differential survival and reproduction of individuals and natural selection explanations cite these causes. I argue that the dynamical interpretation is mistaken and offer in outline an alternative, `statistical'' interpretation, according to which natural selection theory is a fancy kind of `bookkeeping''. It explains by citing the (...)
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  46. John Baker, Kathleen Lynch, Sara Cantillon & Judy Walsh (2006). Equality: Putting the Theory Into Action. Res Publica 12 (4):411-433.score: 30.0
    We outline our central reasons for pursuing the project of equality studies and some of the thinking we have done within an equality studies framework. We try to show that a multi-dimensional conceptual framework, applied to a set of key social contexts and articulating the concerns of subordinate social groups, can be a fruitful way of putting the idea of equality into practice. Finally, we address some central questions about how to bring about egalitarian social change.
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  47. Alvaro Pascual-Leone & Vincent Walsh (2001). Fast Backprojections From the Motion to the Primary Visual Area Necessary for Visual Awareness. Science 292 (5516):510-512.score: 30.0
  48. Denis M. Walsh (2001). Naturalism, Evolution and the Mind. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    This collection of original essays covers a wide range of issues in current naturalised philosophy of mind.
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  49. D. M. Walsh (2006). Organisms as Natural Purposes: The Contemporary Evolutionary Perspective. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 37 (4):771-791.score: 30.0
    I argue that recent advances in developmental biology demonstrate the inadequacy of suborganismal mechanism. The category of the organism, construed as a ’natural purpose’ should play an ineliminable role in explaining ontogenetic development and adaptive evolution. According to Kant the natural purposiveness of organisms cannot be demonstrated to be an objective principle in nature, nor can purposiveness figure in genuine explain. I attempt to argue, by appeal to recent work on self-organization, that the purposiveness of organisms is a natural phenomenon (...)
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