Search results for 'Sean O'Brien' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Seán O'Brien
  1. Sean O'Brien (1997). Video Tools for Teaching Ethics: Two Video Reviews by Sean O'Brien. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 12 (2):120 – 122.score: 5370.0
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  2. Lucy O'Brien, Final Version: O'Brien, L. F. (1996), 'Solipsism and Self-Reference', European Journal of Philosophy 4:175-194.score: 1680.0
    In this paper I want to propose that we see solipsism as arising from certain problems we have about identifying ourselves as subjects in an objective world. The discussion will centre on Wittgenstein’s treatment of solipsism in his Tractatus Logico- Philosophicus. In that work Wittgenstein can be seen to express an unusually profound understanding of the problems faced in trying to give an account of how we, who are subjects, identify ourselves as objects in the (...)
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  3. Mark O'Brien (2006). Global Unions? Theory and Strategies of Organised Labour in the Global Political Economy, Edited by Jeffrey Harrod and Robert O'Brien. Historical Materialism 14 (2):229-239.score: 1680.0
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  4. Sean Marie O'Brien (1992). Fish Vs. Cls: A Defense of Critical Legal Theory. Journal of Social Philosophy 23 (1):64-73.score: 870.0
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  5. Dan O'Brien (2006). An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge. Polity Press.score: 560.0
    An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge guides the reader through the key issues and debates in contemporary epistemology. Lucid, comprehensive and accessible, it is an ideal textbook for students who are new to the subject and for university undergraduates. The book is divided into five parts. Part I discusses the concept of knowledge and distinguishes between different types of knowledge. Part II surveys the sources of knowledge, considering both a priori and a posteriori knowledge. Parts III and IV provide (...)
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  6. Roderick O'Brien (2013). Julian Tenison Woods and Virtue. Australasian Catholic Record, The 90 (4):433.score: 560.0
    O'Brien, Roderick When we held the Woods Centenary Seminar in 1989, the local Naracoorte Herald gave us excellent publicity. I recall sitting with the editor, Richard Peake, as he was briefed by the great Sr Margaret Press, assisted by Fr Kevin Horsell, the parish priest of Bordertown who brought his scientific background, and by me. The editor asked the question: 'If Mary MacKillop is to be canonised, why not Woods?'.
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  7. G. O'Brien & J. Opie, The Multiplicity of Consciousness and the Emergence of Self.score: 560.0
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  8. G. O'Brien & J. Opie, The Role of Representation in Computation.score: 560.0
  9. C. Mortensen, G. Nerlich, G. Cullity & G. O'Brien, Philosophy at the University of Adelaide.score: 560.0
    Chris Mortensen, Graham Nerlich, Garrett Cullity and Gerard O'Brien.
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  10. David P. O'Brien (2009). Human Reasoning Includes a Mental Logic. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):96-97.score: 340.0
    Oaksford & Chater (O&C) have rejected logic in favor of probability theory for reasons that are irrelevant to mental-logic theory, because mental-logic theory differs from standard logic in significant ways. Similar to O&C, mental-logic theory rejects the use of the material conditional and deals with the completeness problem by limiting the scope of its procedures to local sets of propositions.
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  11. Gerard O'Brien & Jon Opie (2001). Sins of Omission and Commission. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):997-998.score: 340.0
    O'Regan & Noë (O&N) fail to address adequately the two most historically important reasons for seeking to explain visual experience in terms of internal representations. They are silent about the apparently inferential nature of perception, and mistaken about the significance of the phenomenology accompanying dreams, hallucinations, and mental imagery.
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  12. Carl O'Brien (forthcoming). Dramatic devices and philosophical content in Plato's Symposium. Archai.score: 340.0
    O Banquete de Platão serve-se de recursos dramáticos diversos, tais como a história-moldura, a organização dos discursos e o ensino de Diotima enquanto meios de orientação do leitor pela mensagem filosófica subjacente, a qual inclui um exame do sistema socrático de educação. Os discípulos de Sócrates demonstram notável entusiasmo pela filosofia, mas parecem incapazes de distinguir o amor por Sócrates do amor pela sabedoria. Agatão ocupa posição de destaque: devido a um trocadilho com o seu nome, a jornada do jantar (...)
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  13. Matthew B. O'Brien (2012). Why Liberal Neutrality Prohibits Same-Sex Marriage: Rawls, Political Liberalism, and the Family. British Journal of American Legal Studies 1 (2):411-466.score: 280.0
    John Rawls’s political liberalism and its ideal of public reason are tremendously influential in contemporary political philosophy and in constitutional law as well. Many, perhaps even most, liberals are Rawlsians of one stripe or another. This is problematic, because most liberals also support the redefinition of civil marriage to include same-sex unions, and as I show, Rawls’s political liberalism actually prohibits same- sex marriage. Recently in Perry v. Schwarzenegger, however, California’s northern federal district court reinterpreted the traditional rational basis review (...)
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  14. Ali M. Quazi & Dennis O'Brien (2000). An Empirical Test of a Cross-National Model of Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 25 (1):33 - 51.score: 280.0
    Most models of corporate social responsibility revolve around the controversy as to whether business is a single dimensional entity of profit maximization or a multi-dimensional entity serving greater societal interests. Furthermore, the models are mostly descriptive in nature and are based on the experiences of western countries. There has been little attempt to develop a model that accounts for corporate social responsibility in diverse environments with differing socio-cultural and market settings. In this paper an attempt has been made to fill (...)
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  15. Gerard O'Brien (1998). The Mind: Embodied, Embedded, but Not Extended. Philosophical Explorations 7:8-83.score: 280.0
    This commentry focuses on the one major ecumenical theme propounded in Andy Clark's Being There that I find difficult to accept; this is Clark’s advocacy, especially in the third and final part of the book, of the extended nature of the embedded, embodied mind.
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  16. Lucy F. O'Brien (2005). Self-Knowledge, Agency, and Force. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (3):580–601.score: 280.0
    My aim in this paper is to articulate further what may be called an agency theory of self-knowledge. Many theorists have stressed how important agency is to self- knowledge, and much work has been done drawing connections between the two notions.<sup>2</sup> However, it has not always been clear what _epistemic_ advantage agency gives us in this area and why it does so. I take it as a constraint on an adequate account of how a subject knows her own mental states (...)
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  17. Lucy F. O'Brien (1996). Solipsism and Self-Reference. European Journal of Philosophy 4 (2):175-194.score: 280.0
    In this paper I want to propose that we see solipsism as arising from certain problems we have about identifying ourselves as subjects in an objective world. The discussion will centre on Wittgenstein.
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  18. Lucy F. O'Brien (2003). Moran on Agency and Self-Knowledge. European Journal of Philosophy 11 (3):391-401.score: 280.0
  19. Gerard O'Brien & Jonathan Opie (1999). A Defense of Cartesian Materialism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (4):939-63.score: 280.0
    One of the principal tasks Dennett sets himself in C onsciousness Explained i s to demolish the Cartesian theatre model of phenomenal consciousness, which in its contemporary garb takes the form of C artesian materialism : the idea that conscious experience is a p rocess of presentation realized in the physical materials of the brain. The now standard response to Dennett is that, in focusing on Cartesian materialism, he attacks an impossibly naive account of consciousness held by no one currently (...)
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  20. Gerard O'Brien & Jonathan Opie (2002). Radical Connectionism: Thinking with (Not in) Language. Language and Communication 22 (3):313-329.score: 280.0
    In this paper we defend a position we call radical connectionism. Radical connectionism claims that cognition _never_ implicates an internal symbolic medium, not even when natural language plays a part in our thought processes. On the face of it, such a position renders the human capacity for abstract thought quite mysterious. However, we argue that connectionism is committed to an analog conception of neural computation, and that representation of the abstract is no more problematic for a system of analog vehicles (...)
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  21. Lucy F. O'Brien (2003). On Knowing One's Own Actions. In Johannes Roessler & Naomi M. Eilan (eds.), Agency and Self-Awareness. Clarendon Press.score: 280.0
    Book description: * Seventeen brand-new essays by leading philosophers and psychologists * Genuinely interdisciplinary work, at the forefront of both fields * Includes a valuable introduction, uniting common threads Leading philosophers and psychologists join forces to investigate a set of problems to do with agency and self-awareness, in seventeen specially written essays. In recent years there has been much psychological and neurological work purporting to show that consciousness and self-awareness play no role in causing actions, and indeed to demonstrate that (...)
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  22. Lucy F. O'Brien (2005). Imagination and the Motivational Role of Belief. Analysis 65 (285):55-62.score: 280.0
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  23. Jonathan Opie & Gerard O'Brien (2004). Notes Toward a Structuralist Theory of Mental Representation. In Hugh Clapin, Phillip Staines & Peter Slezak (eds.), Representation in Mind: New Approaches to Mental Representation. Elsevier. 1--20.score: 280.0
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  24. Gerard O'Brien & Jon Jureidini (2002). Dispensing with the Dynamic Unconscious. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (2):141-153.score: 280.0
    In recent years, a number of contemporary proponents of psychoanalysis have sought to derive support for their conjectures about the _dynamic_ unconscious from the empirical evidence in favor of the _cognitive_ unconscious. It is our contention, however, that far from supporting the dynamic unconscious, recent work in cognitive science suggests that the time has come to dispense with this concept altogether. In this paper we defend this claim in two ways. First, we argue that any attempt to shore up the (...)
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  25. Dan O'Brien (2007). Testimony and Lies. Philosophical Quarterly 57 (227):225–238.score: 280.0
    In certain situations, lies can be used to pass on knowledge. The kinds of cases I focus on are those involving a speaker's devious manipulation of the hearer's irrational or prejudiced thought. These cases show that sometimes a speaker's knowledge of a hearer's mind is necessary for the testimonial transmission of knowledge. They also support a 'seeding' model of knowledge transmission, rather than one that is akin to the postal delivery of complete parcels of information.
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  26. Lucy O'Brien & Matthew Soteriou (eds.) (2009). Mental Actions. Oxford University Press.score: 280.0
  27. Gerard O'Brien & Jonathan Opie (2003). The Multiplicity of Consciousness and the Emergence of the Self. In A. S. David & T. T. J. Kircher (eds.), The Self and Schizophrenia: A Neuropsychological Perspective. Cambridge University Press. 107--120.score: 280.0
    I look out the window and I think that the garden looks nice and the grass looks cool, but the
    thoughts of Eammon Andrews come into my mind.
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  28. Lucy F. O'Brien (1995). Evans on Self-Identification. Noûs 29 (2):232-247.score: 280.0
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  29. Gerard O'Brien & Jonathan Opie (1998). The Disunity of Consciousness. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 76 (3):378-95.score: 280.0
    It is commonplace for both philosophers and cognitive scientists to express their allegiance to the "unity of consciousness". This is the claim that a subject’s phenomenal consciousness, at any one moment in time, is a single thing. This view has had a major influence on computational theories of consciousness. In particular, what we call single-track theories dominate the literature, theories which contend that our conscious experience is the result of a single consciousness-making process or mechanism in the brain. We argue (...)
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  30. Gerard O'Brien & Jonathan Opie (1997). Cognitive Science and Phenomenal Consciousness: A Dilemma, and How to Avoid It. Philosophical Psychology 10 (3):269-86.score: 280.0
    When it comes to applying computational theory to the problem of phenomenal consciousness, cognitive scientists appear to face a dilemma. The only strategy that seems to be available is one that explains consciousness in terms of special kinds of computational processes. But such theories, while they dominate the field, have counter-intuitive consequences; in particular, they force one to accept that phenomenal experience is composed of information processing effects. For cognitive scientists, therefore, it seems to come down to a choice between (...)
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  31. Lucy O'Brien (2007). Self-Knowing Agents. Oxford University Press.score: 280.0
    * Fascinating topic in the philosophy of mind and action * Changes the focus of, and gives fresh momentum to, current discussions of self-identification and self-reference * Rigorous discussion of rival views Lucy OBrien argues that a satisfactory account of first-person reference and self-knowledge needs to concentrate on our nature as agents. She considers two main questions. First, what account of first-person reference can we give that respects the guaranteed nature of such reference? Second, what account can we give of (...)
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  32. Jonathan Opie & Gerard O'Brien (1999). A Connectionist Theory of Phenomenal Experience. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):127-148.score: 280.0
    When cognitive scientists apply computational theory to the problem of phenomenal consciousness, as many of them have been doing recently, there are two fundamentally distinct approaches available. Either consciousness is to be explained in terms of the nature of the representational vehicles the brain deploys; or it is to be explained in terms of the computational processes defined over these vehicles. We call versions of these two approaches _vehicle_ and _process_ theories of consciousness, respectively. However, while there may be space (...)
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  33. Gerard O'Brien (1989). Connectionism, Analogicity and Mental Content. Acta Analytica 22 (22):111-31.score: 280.0
    In Connectionism and the Philosophy of Psychology, Horgan and Tienson (1996) argue that cognitive processes, pace classicism, are not governed by exceptionless, “representation-level” rules; they are instead the work of defeasible cognitive tendencies subserved by the non-linear dynamics of the brain’s neural networks. Many theorists are sympathetic with the dynamical characterisation of connectionism and the general (re)conception of cognition that it affords. But in all the excitement surrounding the connectionist revolution in cognitive science, it has largely gone unnoticed that connectionism (...)
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  34. Gerard O'Brien (1991). Is Connectionism Commonsense? Philosophical Psychology 4 (2):165-78.score: 280.0
  35. Mark Siderits & J. Dervin O'Brien (1976). Zeno and Nāgārjuna on Motion. Philosophy East and West 26 (3):281-299.score: 280.0
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  36. Gerard O'Brien & Jonathan Opie (1999). Putting Content Into a Vehicle Theory of Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):175-196.score: 280.0
    The connectionist vehicle theory of phenomenal experience in the target article identifies consciousness with the brain’s explicit representation of information in the form of stable patterns of neural activity. Commentators raise concerns about both the conceptual and empirical adequacy of this proposal. On the former front they worry about our reliance on vehicles, on representation, on stable patterns of activity, and on our identity claim. On the latter front their concerns range from the general plausibility of a vehicle theory to (...)
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  37. Gerard O'Brien (1993). A Conflation of Folk Psychologies. Prospects for Intentionality Working Papers in Philosophy 3:42-51.score: 280.0
    Stich begins his paper "What is a Theory of Mental Representation?" (1992) by noting that while there is a dizzying range of theories of mental representation in today's philosophical market place, there is very little self-conscious reflection about what a theory of mental representation is supposed to do. This is quite remarkable, he thinks, because if we bother to engage in such reflection, some very surprising conclusions begin to emerge. The most surprising conclusion of all, according to Stich, is that (...)
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  38. Jonathan Opie & Gerard O'Brien (2006). How Do Connectionist Networks Compute? Cognitive Processing 7 (1):30-41.score: 280.0
    Although connectionism is advocated by its proponents as an alternative to the classical computational theory of mind, doubts persist about its _computational_ credentials. Our aim is to dispel these doubts by explaining how connectionist networks compute. We first develop a generic account of computation—no easy task, because computation, like almost every other foundational concept in cognitive science, has resisted canonical definition. We opt for a characterisation that does justice to the explanatory role of computation in cognitive science. Next we examine (...)
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  39. Gerard O'Brien & Jonathan Opie (2001). Connectionist Vehicles, Structural Resemblance, and the Phenomenal Mind. Communication and Cognition (Special Issue) 34 (1-2):13-38.score: 280.0
    We think the best prospect for a naturalistic explanation of phenomenal consciousness is to be found at the confluence of two influential ideas about the mind. The first is the _computational _ _theory of mind_: the theory that treats human cognitive processes as disciplined operations over neurally realised representing vehicles.1 The second is the _representationalist theory of _ _consciousness_: the theory that takes the phenomenal character of conscious experiences (the “what-it-is-likeness”) to be constituted by their representational content.2 Together these two (...)
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  40. Gerard O'Brien (1987). Eliminative Materialism and Our Psychological Self-Knowledge. Philosophical Studies 52 (July):49-70.score: 280.0
    The project of the paper is a critical examination of the "strong thesis of eliminative materialism" in the philosophy of mind--The claim that all the mental entities that constitute the framework of commonsense psychology are, In principle at least, Eliminable from our ontology. The central conclusion reached is that the traditional formulation of this thesis is demonstrably untenable as it rests on a mistaken view of the relationship between our psychological self-Knowledge and language.
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  41. Gerard O'Brien & Jonathan Opie (2004). Notes Toward a Structuralist Theory of Mental Representation. In Hugh Clapin (ed.), Representation in Mind. Elsevier. 1--20.score: 280.0
    Any creature that must move around in its environment to find nutrients and mates, in order to survive and reproduce, faces the problem of sensorimotor control. A solution to this problem requires an on-board control mechanism that can shape the creature’s behaviour so as to render it “appropriate” to the conditions that obtain. There are at least three ways in which such a control mechanism can work, and Nature has exploited them all. The first and most basic way is for (...)
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  42. Daniel O'Brien, Objects of Perception. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 280.0
  43. W. O'Brien (2014). Boredom. Analysis 74 (2):236-244.score: 280.0
    The author proposes an analysis of boredom. The analysis he proposes is that boredom is an unpleasant mental state consisting of weariness, restlessness, and lack of interest, where certain causal relations exist among the components. He goes on to elaborate on and defend his analysis, concluding with some thoughts on the idea that boredom has some grand metaphysical significance.
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  44. Lilian O'brien (2012). Deviance and Causalism. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 93 (2):175-196.score: 280.0
    Drawing on the problem of deviance, I present a novel line of argumentation against causal theories of action. The causalist faces a dilemma: either she adopts a simple account of the causal route between intention and outcome, at the cost of failing to rule out deviance cases, or she adopts a more sophisticated account, at the cost of ruling out cases of intentional action in which the causal route is merely unusual. Underlying this dilemma, I argue, is that the agent's (...)
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  45. Gerard O'Brien & Jonathan Opie (1999). A Connectionist Theory of Phenomenal Experience. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):127-48.score: 280.0
    When cognitive scientists apply computational theory to the problem of phenomenal consciousness, as many of them have been doing recently, there are two fundamentally distinct approaches available. Either consciousness is to be explained in terms of the nature of the representational vehicles the brain deploys; or it is to be explained in terms of the computational processes defined over these vehicles. We call versions of these two approaches vehicle and process theories of consciousness, respectively. However, while there may be space (...)
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  46. Lucy O'Brien (2005). Imagination and the Motivational View of Belief. Analysis 65 (1):55--62.score: 280.0
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  47. Lilian O'Brien (2011). Review of Personal Agency: The Metaphysics of Mind and Action. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (1):172-174.score: 280.0
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  48. Denis O'Brien (1999). La matière chez Plotin: son origine, sa nature. Phronesis 44 (1):45 - 71.score: 280.0
    The origin of matter is one of the last and greatest unsolved mysteries bedevilling modern attempts at understanding the philosophy of the "Enneads." There are two stages in the production of Intellect and of soul. The One or Intellect produces an undifferentiated other, which becomes Intellect or soul by itself turning towards and looking towards the prior principle, with no possibility of the One's "turning towards" or "seeing" itself. But where does matter come from? To arrive at his conception of (...)
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  49. John O'Brien (2007). John Locke, Desire, and the Epistemology of Money. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (4):685 – 708.score: 280.0
  50. Matthew B. O'Brien & Robert C. Koons (2012). Objects of Intention: A Hylomorphic Critique of the New Natural Law Theory. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 86 (4):655-703.score: 280.0
    The “New Natural Law” Theory (NNL) of Germain Grisez, John Finnis, Joseph Boyle, and their collaborators offers a distinctive account of intentional action, which underlies a moral theory that aims to justify many aspects of traditional morality and Catholic doctrine. -/- In fact, we show that the NNL is committed to premises that entail the permissibility of many actions that are irreconcilable with traditional morality and Catholic doctrine, such as elective abortions. These consequences follow principally from two aspects of the (...)
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