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Sean Sayers [169]Sean P. Sayers [1]
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Profile: Sean Sayers (University of Kent at Canterbury)
  1. Sean Sayers (2009). Marxism and Human Nature (Turkish Edn). Yordam Kitap.
  2.  34
    Sean Sayers (1993). Once More on Relative Truth-a Reply. Radical Philosophy 64:35-38.
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  3.  94
    Sean Sayers (1986). Work, Leisure and Human Needs. Thesis Eleven 14 (1):79-96.
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  4. Sean Sayers (2011). MacIntyre and Modernity. In Paul Blackledge & Kelvin Knight (eds.), Virtue and Politics: Alasdair Macintyre's Revolutionary Aristotelianism. University of Notre Dame Press
    At a time when many professional philosophers in the English speaking world have all but given up the attempt to think critically and in large scale terms about the modern world, MacIntyre's work is defiantly untimely, and greatly welcome for that. It is remarkably wide ranging, comprehensive and thought provoking. He has been described as a `revolutionary Aristotelian', but this indicates only part of the picture. His work draws on ideas not only from Marx and Aristotle, but also from analytical (...)
     
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  5. Sean Sayers (2003). Creative Activity and Alienation in Hegel and Marx. Historical Materialism 11 (1):107-128.
    For Marx, work is the fundamental and central activity in human life and, potentially at least, a ful lling and liberating activity. Although this view is implicit throughout Marx’s work, there is little explicit explanation or defence of it. The fullest treatment is in the account of ‘estranged labour’ [entfremdete Arbeit] in the Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts;1 but, even there, Marx does not set out his philosophical assumptions at length. For an understanding of these, one must turn to Hegel. Marx (...)
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  6.  94
    Sean Sayers (2007). The Concept of Labor: Marx and His Critics. Science and Society 71 (4):431 - 454.
    Marx conceives of labor as form-giving activity. This is criticized for presupposing a "productivist" model of labor which regards work that creates a material product — craft or industrial work — as the paradigm for all work (Habermas, Benton, Arendt). Many traditional kinds of work do not seem to fit this picture, and new "immaterial" forms of labor (computer work, service work, etc.) have developed in postindus trial society which, it is argued, necessitate a fundamental revision of Marx's approach (Hardt (...)
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  7.  89
    Sean Sayers (2012). Marx. In Tom Angier (ed.), Ethics: the key thinkers. Bloomsbury
  8.  78
    Sean Sayers (2012). Paul Blackledge, Marxism and Ethics. [REVIEW] International Socialism (136).
  9.  76
    Sean Sayers (2005). Why Work? Marx and Human Nature. Science and Society 69 (4):606 - 616.
    Why work? Most people say that they work only as a means to earn a living. This is also implied by the hedonist account of human nature which underlies utilitarianism and classical economics. It is argued in this paper that Marx’s concept of alienation involves a more satisfactory theory of human nature which is rooted in Hegel’s philosophy. According to this, we are productive beings and work is potentially a fulfilling activity. The fact that it is not experienced as such (...)
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  10. Sean Sayers (2011). Marx and Alienation: Essays on Hegelian Themes. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The concept of alienation: Hegelian themes in modern social thought -- Creative activity and alienation in Hegel and Marx -- The concept of labour -- The individual and society -- Freedom and the "realm of necessity" -- Alienation as a critical concept -- Private property and communism -- The division of labour and its overcoming -- Marx's concept of communism.
     
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  11. Sean Sayers, The Concept of Alienation in Existentialism and Marxism Hegelian Themes in Modern Social Thought.
    The concept of alienation is one of the most important and fruitful legacies of Hegel's social philosophy. It is strange therefore that Hegel's own account is widely rejected, not least by writers in those traditions which have taken up and developed the concept in the most influential ways: Marxism and existentialism.
     
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  12. Sean Sayers (2011). Alienation as a Critical Concept. International Critical Thought 1 (3):287-304.
    This paper discusses Marx’s concept of alienated (or estranged) labour, focusing mainly on his account in the Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844. This concept is frequently taken to be a moral notion based on a concept of universal human nature. This view is criticized and it is argued that the concept of alienation should rather be interpreted in the light of Hegelian historical ideas. In Hegel, alienation is not a purely negative phenomenon; it is a necessary stage of human (...)
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  13.  43
    Sean Sayers (1999). Identity and Community. Journal of Social Philosophy 30 (1):147-160.
    The concepts of identity and community have recently been the subject of a good deal of debate in social philosophy, much of it focused on the ideas of writers like MacIntyre, Taylor, Walzer. These philosophers are often referred to as `communitarians', though they do not constitute a united school and none of them identifies himself as such. Nevertheless, there are good reasons 1 for grouping them together, for they share some important elements of common ground. In their different ways, each (...)
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  14.  76
    Sean Sayers (2009). Review: Axel Honneth: Reification: A New Look at an Old Idea. [REVIEW] Mind 118 (470):476-479.
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  15. Sean Sayers (1984). Marxism and the Dialectical Method: A Critique of G.A. Cohen. Radical Philosophy 36 (36):4-13.
    The dialectical method, Marx Insisted, was at the basis of his account of society. In 1858, in a letter to Engels, he wrote: In the method of treatment the fact that by mere accident I again glanced through Hegel's Logic has been of great service to me... If there should ever be the time for such work again, I would greatly like to make accessible to the ordinary human intelligence, in two or three printer's sheets, what is rational in the (...)
     
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  16.  90
    Sean Sayers (2007). Individual and Society in Marx and Hegel: Beyond the Communitarian Critique of Liberalism. Science and Society 71 (1):84 - 102.
    Marx's concepts of individual and society have their roots in Hegel's philosophy. Like recent communitarian philosophers, both Marx and Hegel reject the idea that the individual is an atomic entity, an idea that runs through liberal social philosophy and classical economics. Human productive activity is essentially social. However, Marx shows that the liberal concepts of individuality and society are not simply philosophical errors; they are products and expressions of the social alienation of free market conditions. Marx's theory develops from Hegel's (...)
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  17. Sean Sayers, The Concept of Authenticity.
    The concept of authenticity -- the idea of `being oneself' or being `true to oneself' -- is central to modern moral thought. Yet it is a puzzling notion. This article discusses two accounts of it. Essentialism holds that each individual has a `true' nature or self. Feelings and actions are authentic when they correspond to this nature. This approach is contrasted with views of the self as a complex entity in which all parts are essential, and in which authenticity involves (...)
     
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  18. Sean Sayers (1997). Review of Theodore M. Porter, Trust in Numbers: The Pursuit of Objectivity in Science and Public Life. [REVIEW] The European Legacy 2 (7):1263-1264.
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  19. Sean Sayers (1997). The A-Z Guide to Modern Social and Political Theorists. In Nöel Parker & Stuart Sim (eds.). Prentice-Hall/Harvester Wheatsheaf 241-245.
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  20. Sean Sayers (2009). Marxism and the Crisis of Capitalism. Philosophical Trends 2009 (5):19-21.
    Since 2007, capitalism has been going through its greatest crisis since the 1930s or before. In 2008, the banking system was saved from meltdown (at least for the time being) only by extensive government intervention in the USA, Britain, and a number of other countries. Stock markets all over the world plummeted. Then the crisis spread to the ‘real’ economy. A long and deep recession followed. Only now are we perhaps beginning to see what may – or may not – (...)
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  21. Sean Sayers (2007). Marxism And Morality. Philosophical Researches 2007 (9):8-12.
    Discussion of Marxism in the Western world since the nineteen-sixties has been dominated by a reaction against Hegelian ideas.1 This agenda has been shared equally by the analytical Marxism which has predominated in the English speaking world and by the structuralist Marxism which has been the major influence in the continental tradition. The main purpose of my own work has been to reassess these attitudes.
     
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  22. Sean Sayers, Dialectic in Western Marxism.
    The fundamental principles of modern dialectical philosophy derive from Hegel. He sums them up as follows. ‘Everything is inherently contradictory ... Contradiction is the root of all movement and vitality, it is only in so far as something has a contradiction within it that it moves, has an urge and activity' (Hegel 1969, 439). In Hegel's philosophy these ideas form part of an all−embracing idealist system which portrays all phenomena ×− both natural and social ×− as subject to dialectic. Marx (...)
     
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  23. Sean Sayers, The Future of Marxism.
    Has Marxism a future, now that communism has collapsed throughout Eastern Europe and is in crisis everywhere else? It is often said that Marxism is discredited and refuted by these events: they signify the triumph of capitalism and the free market, the `end of history'. At the other extreme, some Marxists in the West would like to believe that history has not yet begun. For them, socialism is still a distant dream. The old regimes of the Soviet Union and Eastern (...)
     
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  24. Sean Sayers, Marxism and Human Nature: A Reply to Terry Eagleton.
    Something about my book, Marxism and Human Nature,1 seems to have provoked Eagleton's hostility and clouded his mind, but it is difficult to figure out what. All that is evident from his review is that he has not read the book carefully or taken the trouble to understand it properly.
     
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  25. Sean Sayers (1980). Forces of Production and Relations of Production in Socialist Society. Radical Philosophy 24 (24):19-26.
    It seems evident that class differences and class struggle continue to exist in socialist societies; that is to say, in societies like the Soviet Union and China, which have undergone socialist revolutions and in which private property in the means of production has been largely abolished. I shall not attempt to prove this proposition here; rather it will form my starting point. For my purpose in this paper is to show how the phenomenon of class in socialist society can be (...)
     
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  26.  44
    Sean Sayers (1994). Philosophy and the Information Superhighway. Radical Philosophy 67 (67):63-63.
    The extraordinary capacity of computers to hold text is familiar to anyone who uses a word processor: an average book will fit comfortably onto a 3.5" floppy disc. With the growth of easy means of communication between computers an immense quantity of information has become available on a world-wide basis. The links may not yet amount to a "superhighway", but they are fast, efficient and increasingly user-friendly. Moreover, like the roads, the system is free to users (though the Clinton administration (...)
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  27. Sean Sayers (1976). On the Marxist Dialectic. Radical Philosophy 14 (14):9-19.
    Wherever there is movement, wherever there is life, wherever anything is carried into effect in the actual world, there dialectic is at work. It is also the soul of all knowledge which is truly scientific. (Hegel, Enc. Logic, sec. 81Z, p. 148).
     
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  28.  11
    Sean Sayers (1985). Reality and Reason: Dialectic and the Theory of Knowledge. Blackwell.
    Everything possible to be believed is an image of truth (The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, Blake) Introduction In this book I deal with some of the central ...
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  29. Sean Sayers, A Note on Emergent Materialism.
    In common with other forms of nonreductive materialism, emergent materialism of this sort is accused of trying to have its cake and eat it. Ontological physicalism, it is said, necessarily implies reductionism which rules out the idea that there are irreducible emergent mental properties and laws. For according to such physicalism, everything is composed of physical constituents whose behaviour is governed by the laws of physics and mechanics. It follows that, in theory at least, every particular mental process is describable (...)
     
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  30. Sean Sayers (2006). The New Hegelians: Politics and Philosophy in the Hegelian School. In Douglas Moggach (ed.). Cambridge University Press 261-274.
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  31. Sean Sayers (1992). Review of Robert Meister, Political Identity: Thinking Through Marx. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 33 (2):74-76.
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  32. Sean Sayers (1989). Knowledge as a Social Phenomenon. Radical Philosophy 52 (52):34-7.
    The idea that knowledge is a social phenomenon is no longer either novel or unfamiliar. With the growth of the social sciences, we are accustomed to seeing ideas and beliefs in social and historical terms, and trying to understand how they arise and why they take the forms that they do. Philosophers, however, are only gradually coming to terms with these views. For they call in question ideas about the nature of knowledge which have dominated epistemology since the seventeenth century.
     
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  33. Sean Sayers (2007). Dialectic and Social Criticism. Spartacus 9 (89):86-90.
    other approaches. The first of these is `material thinking' (das materielles Denken): `a contingent consciousness that is absorbed only in material stuff', a form of thought which is rooted in existing conditions and cannot see beyond them. At the `opposite extreme' is the transcendent critical method of `argumentation' (das Räsonieren), which involves `freedom from all content and a sense of vanity towards it'. The dialectical method, Hegel maintains, must `give up this freedom'. It refuses `to intrude into the immanent rhythm (...)
     
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  34. Sean Sayers (2001). Review of Onora O'Neill, Bounds of Justice. [REVIEW] First Review.
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  35.  11
    Sean Sayers (2000). Review of Alasdair MacIntyre, Dependent Rational Animals: Why Human Beings Need the Virtues and Stuart Hampshire, Justice is Conflict. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 102 (102):47-49.
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  36.  9
    Sean Sayers (2004). Review of Adriaan T. Peperzak, Modern Freedom: Hegel's Legal, Moral, and Political Philosophy. [REVIEW] Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 49:158-163.
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  37. Sean Sayers, Ian Hunt, Analytical and Dialectical Marxism, Aldershot and Brookfield VT: Avebury, 1993.
    Hiding behind the anodyne title of this book is a work of large scope and considerable interest for the Hegelian reader. Its main purpose is to vindicate a dialectical interpretation of Marxism in the context of recent analytical Marxism. The book falls into two parts. The first contains a detailed account of the dialectical philosophy implicit in Marx's work, and of its background in the philosophies of Kant and Hegel. The second shows how this account of Marx's approach can be (...)
     
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  38. Sean Sayers (2008). Marxist Philosophy in Britain: An Overview. Modern Philosophy 2008 (2):52-57.
    Scholarly interest in Marxist philosophy has fluctuated dramatically in the past fifty years. Before that, there was little scholarly work in Britain on Marxist philosophy or on Marxism more generally. In the nineteen fifties there were important contributions by economic theorists1 and social historians2 but academic discussion of Marx's philosophy or even of his political theory was minimal and mainly by critics.3 There were only a few philosophers who adhered to Marxism and these were mostly associated with the British Communist (...)
     
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  39. Sean Sayers, Marxism and Actually Existing Socialism.
    I recently visited the Soviet Union. I was there for only one week, as a tourist: time to get only a very limited and superficial impression of life there. Nevertheless, it was a sobering and thought-provoking experience. For even such a brief visit forces one to confront the problems raised by the evidently unideal character of the Soviet Union and other `actually existing' socialist societies. These are amongst the greatest problems facing socialists in the world today.
     
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  40. Sean Sayers (1991). F.H. Bradley and the Concept of Relative Truth. Radical Philosophy 59 (59):15-20.
    Few people now read F.H. Bradley and the British Idealists. This is not because they are not important philosophers. On the contrary. It is generally agreed that Bradley, in particular, 2 is a major philosopher, as well as a great, if demanding, writer. It is rather because Bradley and the other Idealists are thought to inhabit a philosophical world quite different from that of the mainstream of contemporary philosophy. They seem to be concerned with issues and problems which have little (...)
     
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  41.  28
    Sean Sayers (2006). Freedom and the 'Realm of Necessity'. In Douglas Moggach (ed.), The New Hegelians: Politics and Philosophy in the Hegelian School. Cambridge University Press
    The realm of freedom actually begins only where labour which is determined by necessity and mundane considerations ceases; thus in the very nature of things it lies beyond the sphere of actual material production. Just as the savage must wrestle with Nature to satisfy his wants, to maintain and reproduce life, so must civilized man, and he must do so in all social formations and under all possible modes of production. With his development this realm of physical necessity expands as (...)
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  42.  4
    Sean Sayers, The Need to Work: A Perspective From Philosophy.
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  43. Sean Sayers (1987). Hegel and Modern Philosophy. In David Lamb (ed.). Croom Helm 143-60.
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  44. Sean Sayers (1989). Images of the French Revolution. Radical Philosophy 53 (53):50-51.
    A fascinating and disturbing exhibition was on show at the British Museum this summer (‘The Shadow of the Guillotine: Britain and the French Revolution’, until 10 September). The exhibition was one of the main British bicentenary events. As the title suggests, however, it was not the usual celebration. Certainly, it differed completely from the big bicentenary exhibition in Paris (‘The French Revolution and Europe: 1789-99’, Grand Palais, until 26 July). There, the focus was on the Revolution’s positive achievements. In London (...)
     
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  45. Sean Sayers, A Brief History.
    Radical Philosophy was born in the aftermath of the student movement of the 1960s. At that time, philosophy in British universities was very conservative and traditional. Ordinary language philosophy, the analytical approach, and the empiricist tradition were absolutely dominant. However, the student movement of the 1960s had opened young people's minds to a whole new range of radical ideas and issues. These were dismissed as not worthy of study, and excluded from discussion in philosophy departments.
     
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  46.  1
    Sean Sayers (1982). Mao and the Cultural Revolution: What Went Wrong? China Now (100):10-11.
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  47.  23
    Sean Sayers (1995). The Value of Community. Radical Philosophy 69 (69):2-4.
    Whether the policies of the Thatcher and Reagan years brought any overall economic benefits is doubtful; that they have had high social costs is now quite evident. The unfettered pursuit of self-interest has weakened social bonds and led to social decay and disintegration on a scale which is causing alarm right across the political spectrum. Until recently such concerns were voiced only from the left, but now the right is also waking up to them: witness, for example, the Conservatives' recent (...)
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  48.  4
    Sean Sayers (1996). Review of Kevin Anderson, Lenin, Hegel, and Western Marxism: A Critical Study. [REVIEW] Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 34 (34):72-76.
  49. Sean Sayers, Making Room for the Mental.
    According to materialism, everything that exists or happens is ultimately material or physical. In some form or other, this philosophy is a fundamental component of modern thought. For, with the development of modern science, it has become increasingly clear that natural phenomena can be described and understood in materialistic terms, without recourse to the notions of a divine creator or an immaterial human mind.
     
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  50.  16
    Sean Sayers (2001). The Importance of Hegel for Marx: Reply to Zarembka. Historical Materialism 8 (1):367-372.
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