Search results for 'Sedat Aybar' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sedat Aybar & Costas Lapavitsas (2001). The Recent Turkish Crisis: Another Step Toward Free Market Authoritarianism. Historical Materialism 8 (1):297-308.score: 240.0
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  2. Luz Ascárate, Raphael Aybar, Ethel Barja, Giancarlo Bellina, Romeld Bustamante, Josimar Castilla, Juan Ignacio Chávez, Maverick Díaz, Fedra Gutiérrez, Eduardo Llosa, Rafael Moreno, José Luis Obregón, Ana Luisa Quispe, Marlon Rivas, Soledad Sevilla, Manuel Vera, Ruth Zea & Arturo Rivas (2012). Repertorio bibliográfico sobre Martin Heidegger. Estudios de Filosofía 9.score: 30.0
    El Repertorio bibliográfico sobre Martin Heidegger que se presenta a continuación, reúne la información obtenida de las más de 240 revistas de filosofía disponibles en la Hemeroteca de la Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú. El Repertorio incluye referencias bibliográficas completas de los artículos, reseñas, estudios críticos, traducciones y otros documentos que abordan la obra del importante pensador alemán hasta el año 2010.
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  3. Raphael Aybar & Cesare Del Mastro (2013). Danielle Cohen-Levinas: Lo que no puede ser dicho. Una lectura estética en Emmanuel Levinas. Estudios de Filosofía 11:99-109.score: 30.0
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  4. Raphael Aybar & Cesare Del Mastro (2013). Danielle Cohen-Levinas: Lo que no puede ser dicho. Una lectura estética en Emmanuel Levinas. Estudios de Filosofía 11:99-109.score: 30.0
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  5. B. Aybar (1953). El trabajo: modificación de la naturaleza en la línea de los valores. Humanitas 1 (2):71-76.score: 30.0
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  6. Samuel R. Aybar, Joshua D. Harlan & Won J. Lee (1991). John Rawls. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 1 (1):38-47.score: 30.0
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  7. B. Aybar (1954). Reflejos psíquicos a distancia. Humanitas 1 (3):203-211.score: 30.0
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  8. Elphège P. Nora, Bryan R. Lajoie, Edda G. Schulz, Luca Giorgetti, Ikuhiro Okamoto, Nicolas Servant, Tristan Piolot, Nynke L. van Berkum, Johannes Meisig & John Sedat (2012). Spatial Partitioning of the Regulatory Landscape of the X-Inactivation Centre. In Jeffrey Kastner (ed.), Nature. Mit Press. 381-385.score: 30.0
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  9. W. J. Slater (1979). Greek Lexicography F. R. Adrados, E. Gangutia, J. Lpez Facal, C. Serrano Aybar: Introductin a la Lexicografa griega. Pp. x + 280. Madrid: Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientficas, Instituto 'A. de Nebrija', | 1977. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 29 (01):88-90.score: 15.0
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  10. G. Bailhache (2011). Jacques SÉDAT, Comprendre Freud. Archives de Philosophie 74 (2):325.score: 15.0
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  11. Francisco Rego (1983). La filosofía de Benjamín Aybar. Cuyo 16:55-97.score: 15.0
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  12. Victor Cellarius (2011). 'Early Terminal Sedation' is a Distinct Entity. Bioethics 25 (1):46-54.score: 8.0
    There has been much discussion regarding the acceptable use of sedation for palliation. A particularly contentious practice concerns deep, continuous sedation given to patients who are not imminently dying and given without provision of hydration or nutrition, with the end result that death is hastened. This has been called ‘early terminal sedation’. Early terminal sedation is a practice composed of two legally and ethically accepted treatment options. Under certain conditions, patients have the right to reject hydration and nutrition, even if (...)
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  13. Sam Rys, Reginald Deschepper, Freddy Mortier, Luc Deliens, Douglas Atkinson & Johan Bilsen (2012). The Moral Difference or Equivalence Between Continuous Sedation Until Death and Physician-Assisted Death: Word Games or War Games? [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):171-183.score: 8.0
    Continuous sedation until death (CSD), the act of reducing or removing the consciousness of an incurably ill patient until death, often provokes medical–ethical discussions in the opinion sections of medical and nursing journals. Some argue that CSD is morally equivalent to physician-assisted death (PAD), that it is a form of “slow euthanasia.” A qualitative thematic content analysis of opinion pieces was conducted to describe and classify arguments that support or reject a moral difference between CSD and PAD. Arguments pro and (...)
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  14. Kasper Raus, Sigrid Sterckx & Freddy Mortier (2011). Continuous Deep Sedation at the End of Life and the 'Natural Death' Hypothesis. Bioethics 26 (6):329-336.score: 8.0
    Surveys in different countries (e.g. the UK, Belgium and The Netherlands) show a marked recent increase in the incidence of continuous deep sedation at the end of life (CDS). Several hypotheses can be formulated to explain the increasing performance of this practice. In this paper we focus on what we call the ‘natural death’ hypothesis, i.e. the hypothesis that acceptance of CDS has spread rapidly because death after CDS can be perceived as a ‘natural’ death by medical practitioners, patients' relatives (...)
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  15. Laura Hawryluck, William Harvey, Louise Lemieux-Charles & Peter Singer (2002). Consensus Guidelines on Analgesia and Sedation in Dying Intensive Care Unit Patients. BMC Medical Ethics 3 (1):1-9.score: 8.0
    Background Intensivists must provide enough analgesia and sedation to ensure dying patients receive good palliative care. However, if it is perceived that too much is given, they risk prosecution for committing euthanasia. The goal of this study is to develop consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients that help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia. Methods Using the Delphi technique, panelists rated levels of agreement with statements describing how analgesics and sedatives should be given to dying (...)
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  16. Jeroen G. J. Hasselaar (2008). Palliative Sedation Until Death: An Approach From Kant's Ethics of Virtue. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (6):387-396.score: 8.0
    This paper is concerned with the moral justification for palliative sedation until death. Palliative sedation involves the intentional lowering of consciousness for the relief of untreatable symptoms. The paper focuses on the moral problems surrounding the intentional lowering of consciousness until death itself, rather than possible adjacent life-shortening effects. Starting from a Kantian perspective on virtue, it is shown that continuous deep sedation until death (CDS) does not conflict with the perfect duty of moral self-preservation because CDS does not destroy (...)
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  17. Srivas Chennu & Tristan A. Bekinschtein (2012). Arousal Modulates Auditory Attention and Awareness: Insights From Sleep, Sedation, and Disorders of Consciousness. Frontiers in Psychology 3:65-65.score: 8.0
    The interplay between top-down, bottom-up attention and consciousness is frequently tested in altered states of consciousness, including transitions between stages of sleep and sedation, and in pathological disorders of consciousness (the vegetative and minimally conscious states; VS and MCS). One of the most widely used tasks to assess cognitive processing in this context is the auditory oddball paradigm, where an infrequent change in a sequence of sounds elicits, in awake subjects, a characteristic EEG event-related potential (ERP) called the mismatch negativity (...)
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  18. Sam Rys, Freddy Mortier, Luc Deliens, Reginald Deschepper, Margaret Pabst Battin & Johan Bilsen (2013). Continuous Sedation Until Death: Moral Justifications of Physicians and Nurses—a Content Analysis of Opinion Pieces. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):533-542.score: 8.0
    Continuous sedation until death (CSD), the act of reducing or removing the consciousness of an incurably ill patient until death, often provokes medical-ethical discussions in the opinion sections of medical and nursing journals. A content analysis of opinion pieces in medical and nursing literature was conducted to examine how clinicians define and describe CSD, and how they justify this practice morally. Most publications were written by physicians and published in palliative or general medicine journals. Terminal Sedation and Palliative Sedation are (...)
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  19. H. C. Müller-Busch, Fuat S. Oduncu, Susanne Woskanjan & Eberhard Klaschik (2005). Attitudes on Euthanasia, Physician-Assisted Suicide and Terminal Sedation--A Survey of the Members of the German Association for Palliative Medicine. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (3):333-339.score: 7.0
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  20. Joseph Boyle (2004). Medical Ethics and Double Effect: The Case of Terminal Sedation. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (1):51-60.score: 6.0
    The use of terminal sedation to control theintense discomfort of dying patients appearsboth to be an established practice inpalliative care and to run counter to the moraland legal norm that forbids health careprofessionals from intentionally killingpatients. This raises the worry that therequirements of established palliative care areincompatible with moral and legal opposition toeuthanasia. This paper explains how thedoctrine of double effect can be relied on todistinguish terminal sedation from euthanasia. The doctrine of double effect is rooted inCatholic moral casuistry, but (...)
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  21. Kasper Raus, Sigrid Sterckx & Freddy Mortier (2011). Is Continuous Sedation at the End of Life an Ethically Preferable Alternative to Physician-Assisted Suicide? American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):32 - 40.score: 6.0
    The relatively new practice of continuous sedation at the end of life (CS) is increasingly being debated in the clinical and ethical literature. This practice received much attention when a U.S. Supreme Court ruling noted that the availability of CS made legalization of physician-assisted suicide (PAS) unnecessary, as CS could alleviate even the most severe suffering. This view has been widely adopted. In this article, we perform an in-depth analysis of four versions of this ?argument of preferable alternative.? Our goal (...)
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  22. S. H. Lipuma (2013). Continuous Sedation Until Death as Physician-Assisted Suicide/Euthanasia: A Conceptual Analysis. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (2):190-204.score: 6.0
    A distinction is commonly drawn between continuous sedation until death and physician-assisted suicide/euthanasia. Only the latter is found to involve killing, whereas the former eludes such characterization. I argue that continuous sedation until death is equivalent to physician-assisted suicide/euthanasia in that both involve killing. This is established by first defining and clarifying palliative sedation therapies in general and continuous sedation until death in particular. A case study analysis and a look at current practices are provided. This is followed by a (...)
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  23. Charles D. Douglas, Ian H. Kerridge & Rachel A. Ankeny (2013). Narratives of 'Terminal Sedation', and the Importance of the Intention-Foresight Distinction in Palliative Care Practice. Bioethics 27 (1):1-11.score: 6.0
    The moral importance of the ‘intention–foresight’ distinction has long been a matter of philosophical controversy, particularly in the context of end-of-life care. Previous empirical research in Australia has suggested that general physicians and surgeons may use analgesic or sedative infusions with ambiguous intentions, their actions sometimes approximating ‘slow euthanasia’. In this paper, we report findings from a qualitative study of 18 Australian palliative care medical specialists, using in-depth interviews to address the use of sedation at the end of life. The (...)
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  24. M. Y. Rady & J. L. Verheijde (2012). Distress From Voluntary Refusal of Food and Fluids to Hasten Death: What is the Role of Continuous Deep Sedation? Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (8):510-512.score: 6.0
    In assisted dying, the end-of-life trajectory is shortened to relieve unbearable suffering. Unbearable suffering is defined broadly enough to include cognitive (early dementia), psychosocial or existential distress. It can include old-age afflictions that are neither life-threatening nor fatal in the “vulnerable elderly”. The voluntary refusal of food and fluids (VRFF) combined with continuous deep sedation (CDS) for assisted dying is legal. Scientific understanding of awareness of internal and external nociceptive stimuli under CDS is rudimentary. CDS may blunt the wakefulness component (...)
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  25. Antoine Baumann, Frederique Claudot, Gerard Audibert, Paul-Michel Mertes & Louis Puybasset (2011). The Ethical and Legal Aspects of Palliative Sedation in Severely Brain Injured Patients: A French Perspective. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 6 (1):4-.score: 6.0
    To fulfill their crucial duty of relieving suffering in their patients, physicians may have to administer palliative sedation when they implement treatment-limitation decisions such as the withdrawal of life-supporting interventions in patients with poor prognosis chronic severe brain injury. The issue of palliative sedation deserves particular attention in adults with serious brain injuries and in neonates with severe and irreversible brain lesions, who are unable to express pain or to state their wishes. In France, treatment limitation decisions for these patients (...)
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  26. George P. Smith (1998). Terminal Sedation as Palliative Care: Revalidating a Right to a Good Death. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (4):382-387.score: 6.0
    Not everyone finds a in suffering. Indeed, even those who do subscribe to this interpretation recognize the responsibility of each individual to show not only sensitivity and compassion but render assistance to those in distress. Pharmacologic hypnosis, morphine intoxication, and terminal sedation provide their own type of medical to the terminally ill patient suffering unremitting pain. More and more states are enacting legislation that recognizes this need of the dying to receive relief through regulated administration of controlled substances. Wider legislative (...)
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  27. S. N. Etkind (2012). Terminal Sedation: An Emotional Decision in End-of-Life Care. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (8):508-509.score: 6.0
    A patient with end-stage motor neurone disease was admitted for hospice care with worsening bulbar symptoms. Although he initially walked onto the ward he became very distressed and asked for sedation. After much discussion, this man was deeply sedated, and after some harrowing days, died. Was it right to provide terminal sedation? What should the threshold be for such treatment? How should our personal reservations affect how we approach the distressed patient in an end-of-life situation?
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  28. G. M. Craig (1996). On Withholding Artificial Hydration and Nutrition From Terminally Ill Sedated Patients. The Debate Continues. Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (3):147-153.score: 6.0
    The author reviews and continues the debate initiated by her recent paper in this journal. The paper was critical of certain aspects of palliative medicine, and caused Ashby and Stoffell to modify the framework they proposed in 1991. It now takes account of the need for artificial hydration to satisfy thirst, or other symptoms due to lack of fluid intake in the terminally ill. There is also a more positive attitude to the emotional needs and ethical views of the patient's (...)
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  29. R. Janssens, J. J. M. van Delden & G. A. M. Widdershoven (2012). Palliative Sedation: Not Just Normal Medical Practice. Ethical Reflections on the Royal Dutch Medical Association's Guideline on Palliative Sedation. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (11):664-668.score: 6.0
    The main premise of the Royal Dutch Medical Association's (RDMA) guideline on palliative sedation is that palliative sedation, contrary to euthanasia, is normal medical practice. Although we do not deny the ethical distinctions between euthanasia and palliative sedation, we will critically analyse the guideline's argumentation strategy with which euthanasia is demarcated from palliative sedation. First, we will analyse the guideline's main premise, which entails that palliative sedation is normal medical treatment. After this, we will critically discuss three crucial propositions of (...)
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  30. L. A. Jansen (2010). Disambiguating Clinical Intentions: The Ethics of Palliative Sedation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (1):19-31.score: 6.0
    It is often claimed that the intentions of physicians are multiple, ambiguous, and uncertain—at least with respect to end-of-life care. This claim provides support for the conclusion that the principle of double effect is of little or no value as a guide to end-of-life pain management. This paper critically discusses this claim. It argues that proponents of the claim fail to distinguish two different senses of “intention,” and that, as a result, they are led to exaggerate the extent to which (...)
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  31. Sophie M. Bruinsma, Judith A. C. Rietjens, Siebe J. Swart, Roberto S. G. M. Perez, Johannes J. M. Van Delden & Agnes van der Heide (forthcoming). Estimating the Potential Life-Shortening Effect of Continuous Sedation Until Death: A Comparison Between Two Approaches. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101459.score: 6.0
    Context In some cases, physicians estimate that continuous sedation until death may have a life-shortening effect. The accuracy of these estimations can be questioned. Aim The aim of this study is to compare two approaches to estimate the potential life-shortening effect of continuous sedation until death. Methods In 2008, 370 Dutch physicians filled out a questionnaire and reported on their last patient who received continuous sedation until death. The potential life-shortening effect of continuous sedation was estimated through a direct approach (...)
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  32. Per Nortvedt, Gunnvald Kvarstein & Ingvild Jønland (2005). Sedation of Patients in Intensive Care Medicine and Nursing: Ethical Issues. Nursing Ethics 12 (5):522-536.score: 6.0
    This article focuses on the ethical aspects of medically-induced sedation and pain relief in intensive care medicine. The study results reported are part of a larger investigation of patients’ experiences of being sedated and receiving pain relief, and also families’ experiences of having a close relative under controlled sedation in an intensive care unit. The study is based on qualitative in-depth interviews with nine nurses and six doctors working in intensive care and surgical units in a major Norwegian hospital. The (...)
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  33. Kasper Raus, Jayne Brown, Clive Seale, Judith Ac Rietjens, Rien Janssens, Sophie Bruinsma, Freddy Mortier, Sheila Payne & Sigrid Sterckx (2014). Continuous Sedation Until Death: The Everyday Moral Reasoning of Physicians, Nurses and Family Caregivers in the UK, The Netherlands and Belgium. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):14.score: 6.0
    Continuous sedation is increasingly used as a way to relieve symptoms at the end of life. Current research indicates that some physicians, nurses, and relatives involved in this practice experience emotional and/or moral distress. This study aims to provide insight into what may influence how professional and/or family carers cope with such distress.
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  34. J. Gielen, S. Van den Branden, T. Van Iersel & B. Broeckaert (2012). Flemish Palliative-Care Nurses' Attitudes to Palliative Sedation: A Quantitative Study. Nursing Ethics 19 (5):692-704.score: 6.0
    Palliative sedation is an option of last resort to control refractory suffering. In order to better understand palliative-care nurses’ attitudes to palliative sedation, an anonymous questionnaire was sent to all nurses (589) employed in palliative care in Flanders (Belgium). In all, 70.5% of the nurses (n = 415) responded. A large majority did not agree that euthanasia is preferable to palliative sedation, were against non-voluntary euthanasia in the case of a deeply and continuously sedated patient and considered it generally better (...)
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  35. Niels Lynøe (forthcoming). Physicians' Practices When Frustrating Patients' Needs: A Comparative Study of Restrictiveness in Offering Abortion and Sedation Therapy. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101194.score: 6.0
    In this paper it is argued that physicians’ restrictive attitudes in offering abortions during 1946–1965 in Sweden were due to their private values. The values, however, were rarely presented openly. Instead physicians’ values influenced their assessment of the facts presented—that is, the women's’ trustworthiness. In this manner the physicians were able to conceal their private values and impede the women from getting what they wanted and needed. The practice was concealed from both patients and physicians and never publicly discussed. It (...)
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  36. Palliative Sedation (2002). Part VI Palliative Sedation. In Chris Gastmans (ed.), Between Technology and Humanity: The Impact of Technology on Health Care Ethics. Leuven University Press. 217.score: 6.0
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  37. Margaret P. Battin (2008). Terminal Sedation: Pulling the Sheet Over Our Eyes. Hastings Center Report 38 (5):pp. 27-30.score: 5.0
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  38. Bert Broeckaert (2011). Palliative Sedation, Physician-Assisted Suicide, and Euthanasia: “Same, Same but Different”? American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):62 - 64.score: 5.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 62-64, June 2011.
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  39. Alexander A. Kon (2011). Palliative Sedation: It's Not a Panacea. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):41 - 42.score: 5.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 41-42, June 2011.
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  40. Ronald E. Cranford & Raymond Gensinger (2002). Hospital Policy on Terminal Sedation and Euthanasia. HEC Forum 14 (3):259-264.score: 5.0
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  41. Jeffrey T. Berger (2011). Clarifying the Ethics of Continuous Sedation. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):46 - 47.score: 5.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 46-47, June 2011.
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  42. Ben A. Rich (2012). Terminal Suffering and the Ethics of Palliative Sedation. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (01):30-39.score: 5.0
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  43. V. Cellarius (2008). Terminal Sedation and the "Imminence Condition&Quot;. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (2):69-72.score: 5.0
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  44. Jeffrey T. Berger (2010). Rethinking Guidelines for the Use of Palliative Sedation. Hastings Center Report 40 (3):32-38.score: 5.0
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  45. Samuel H. LiPuma (2011). The Lacking of Moral Equivalency for Continuous Sedation and PAS. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):48 - 49.score: 5.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 48-49, June 2011.
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  46. Eli Feen (2011). Continuous Deep Sedation: Consistent With Physician's Role as Healer. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):49 - 51.score: 5.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 49-51, June 2011.
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  47. Tito B. Carvalho, Mohamed Y. Rady, Joseph L. Verheijde & Jason Scott Robert (2011). Continuous Deep Sedation in End-of-Life Care: Disentangling Palliation From Physician-Assisted Death. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):60 - 62.score: 5.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 60-62, June 2011.
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  48. Suzanne van de Vathorst & Maartje Schermer (2011). Additional Reasons for Not Viewing Continuous Sedation as Preferable Alternative for Physician-Assisted Suicide. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):43 - 44.score: 5.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 43-44, June 2011.
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  49. R. Gillon (1994). Palliative Care Ethics: Non-Provision of Artificial Nutrition and Hydration to Terminally Ill Sedated Patients. Journal of Medical Ethics 20 (3):131-187.score: 5.0
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  50. J. J. M. van Delden (2007). Terminal Sedation: Source of a Restless Ethical Debate. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (4):187.score: 5.0
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