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  1. Seiriol Morgan (2009). Can There Be a Kantian Consequentialism? Ratio 22 (1):19-40.
    In On What Matters Derek Parfit argues that we need to make a significant reassessment of the relationship between some central positions in moral philosophy, because, contrary to received opinion, Kantians, contractualists and consequentialists are all 'climbing the same mountain on different sides'. In Parfit's view Kant's own attempt to outline an account of moral obligation fails, but when it is modified in ways entirely congenial to his thinking, a defensible Kantian contractualism can be produced, which survives the objections which (...)
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  2. Seiriol Morgan (2008). Moral Philosophy, Moral Identity and Moral Cacophony: On MacIntyre on the Modern Self. Analyse and Kritik 30 (1).
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  3. Seiriol Morgan (2008). The Inner Life of the'Dear Self. In Nafsika Athanassoulis & Samantha Vice (eds.), The Moral Life: Essays in Honour of John Cottingham. Palgrave Macmillan. 111.
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  4. Seiriol Morgan (2008). Unmasking MacIntyre’s Metaphysics of the Self. Analyse & Kritik 30 (1):157-175.
    This paper focuses on Alasdair MacIntyre’s critique of the modern self, arguing that we are not as bereft of the resources to engage in rational thought about value as he makes out. I claim that MacIntyre’s argument presumes that philosophy has a much greater power to shape individuals and cultures than it in fact has. In particular, he greatly exaggerates the extent to which the character of the modern self has been an effect of the philosophical views of the self (...)
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  5. Nafsika Athanassoulis & Seiriol Morgan (2006). Conference on the British Society for Ethical Theory. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (3):249-309.
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  6. Seiriol Morgan (2006). Naturalism and Normativity. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (2):319 - 344.
    Synthetic naturalism is a form of moral realism which holds that we can discover a posteriori that moral properties exist and are natural properties. On this view moral discourse earns the right to be construed realistically because it meets the conditions that license realism about any discourse, that properties it represents as existing pull their weight in empirical explanations of our observations of the world. I argue that naturalism is an inadequate metaphysics of moral value, because parallel arguments to those (...)
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  7. Seiriol Morgan (2005). The Missing Formal Proof of Humanity's Radical Evil in Kant's Religion. Philosophical Review 114 (1):63-114.
  8. Seiriol Morgan (2003). Dark Desires. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 6 (4):377-410.
    An influential view of sexual morality claims that participant consent is sufficient for the moral permissibility of a sexual act. I argue that the complex and frequently dark nature of sexual desire precludes this, because some sexual desire has a character such that it should not be gratified, even if this were consented to. I illustrate this with a discussion of a famous literary character, the Vicomte de Valmont, and draw on Kant's anthropology to illuminate the nature of such desire, (...)
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  9. Seiriol Morgan (2003). Sex in the Head. Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (1):1–16.
    Recent philosophical writing on sexual desire divides broadly into two camps. Reductionists take sexual desire to aim at an essentially physical bodily pleasure, whereas intentionalist accounts take a focus upon the reciprocal interaction of the mental states of the partners to be crucial for understanding the phenomenon. I argue that the apparent plausibility of reductionism rests upon the flawed assumption that sexual pleasure has the same uniform bodily character in all sexual encounters, which rests in turn upon flawed assumptions in (...)
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