Search results for 'Self (Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Norman Fischer (1979). Economy and Self: Philosophy and Economics From the Mercantilists to Marx. Greenwood Press.
  2. Pauliina Remes (2007). Plotinus on Self: The Philosophy of the 'We'. Cambridge University Press.
    Plotinus, the founder of the Neoplatonic school of philosophy, conceptualises two different notions of self (or 'us'): the corporeal and the rational. Personality and imperfection mark the former, while goodness and a striving for understanding mark the latter. Dr Remes grounds the two selfhoods in deep-seated Platonic ontological commitments, following their manifestations, interrelations and sometimes uneasy coexistence in philosophical psychology, emotional therapy and ethics. Plotinus interest lies in what it means for a human being to be a temporal and (...)
     
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  3.  65
    A. E. Pitson (2002). Hume's Philosophy of the Self. Routledge.
    This is a clear assessment of Hume's theories of the self and personal identity, including his famous Treatise on Human Nature . Pitson provides a critical exploration of his thinking, also examining the continuing relevance of Hume's theories for contemporary philosophy and relating it to his broader reflections on human nature itself. Divided into two parts, Pitson's study follows Hume's important distinction between two aspects of personal identity: the "mental" and the "agency". The first part discusses Hume's conception of (...)
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  4.  73
    Konrad Banicki (2015). Therapeutic Arguments, Spiritual Exercises, or the Care of the Self. Martha Nussbaum, Pierre Hadot and Michel Foucault on Ancient Philosophy. Ethical Perspectives 22 (4):601-634.
    The practical aspect of ancient philosophy has been recently made a focus of renewed metaphilosophical investigation. After a brief presentation of three accounts of this kind developed by Martha Nussbaum, Pierre Hadot, and Michel Foucault, the model of the therapeutic argument developed by Nussbaum is called into question from the perspectives offered by her French colleagues, who emphasize spiritual exercise (Hadot) or the care of the self (Foucault). The ways in which the account of Nussbaum can be defended are (...)
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  5. Jiri Benovsky (forthcoming). Buddhist Philosophy and the No-Self View. Philosophy East and West.
    A widespread interpretation of Buddhist thought concerning the Self makes a prominent place for the claim that there is no Self. This claim is motivated, in Buddhist philosophy, by the idea that if there were a Self, it would have to be a permanent entity that would be a 'bearer' of individual psychological states, but that since there is no such permanent bearer, there is no Self. In this article, I challenge a core assumption of this (...)
     
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  6. Dan Zahavi (2002). First-Person Thoughts and Embodied Self-Awareness: Some Reflections on the Relation Between Recent Analytic Philosophy and Cognitive Science. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (1):7-26.
    The article examines some of the main theses about self-awareness developed in recent analytic philosophy of mind (especially the work of Bermúdez), and points to a number of striking overlaps between these accounts and the ones to be found in phenomenology. Given the real risk of unintended repetitions, it is argued that it would be counterproductive for philosophy of mind to ignore already existing resources, and that both analytical philosophy and phenomenology would profit from a more open exchange.
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  7. Arindam Chakrabarti (2011). Troubles with a Second Self: The Problem of Other Minds in 11th Century Indian and 20th Century Western Philosophy. Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 1 (1):23-35.
    In contemporary Western analytic philosophy, the classic analogical argument explaining our knowledge of other minds has been rejected. But at least three alternative positive theories of our knowledge of the second person have been formulated: the theory-theory, the simulation theory and the theory of direct empathy. After sketching out the problems faced by these accounts of the ego’s access to the contents of the mind of a “second ego”, this paper tries to recreate one argument given by Abhinavagupta (Shaiva philosopher (...)
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  8. Christian Maurer (2009). Self-Love in Early 18th Century British Moral Philosophy: Shaftesbury, Mandeville, Hutcheson, Butler and Campbell. Dissertation, Neuchâtel
    The study focuses on the debates on self-love in early 18th - century British moral philosophy. It examines the intricate relations of these debates with questions concerning human nature and morality in five central authors : Anthony Ashley Cooper the 3rd Earl of Shaftesbury, Bernard Mandeville, Francis Hutcheson, Joseph Butler and Archibald Campbell. One of the central claims of this study is that a distinction between five different concepts of self-love is necessary to achieve a clear understanding of (...)
     
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  9. Robert C. Solomon (1988). Continental Philosophy Since 1750: The Rise and Fall of the Self. Oxford University Press.
    The flowering of creative and speculative philosophy that emerged in modern Europe--particularly in Germany--is a thrilling adventure story as well as an essential chapter in the history of philosophy. In this integrative narrative, Solomon provides an accessible introduction to the major authors and movements of modern European philosophy, including the Enlightenment and Romanticism, Rousseau, German Idealism, Kant, Fichte, Schelling and the Romantics, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Feuerbach, Max Brentano, Meinong, Frege, Dilthey, Bergson, Nietzsche, Husserl, Freud, Wittgenstein, Heidegger, hermeneutics, Sartre, Postmodernism, Structuralism, (...)
     
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  10.  8
    Nora Hämäläinen (2016). Self-Help, Moral Philosophy, and the Moral Present. Human Studies 39 (2):289-306.
    In this paper I argue that the lack of interest, among analytic moral philosophers, in the contingencies of our moral present, produces an impoverished moral philosophy, unable to address the moral problems and quandaries of ordinary people. What is needed to remedy this is a broadening of the scope of the moral philosopher’s thought to include a rich attention to moral phenomena of the present. One such phenomenon, attended to by sociologists and critical journalists over the past few decades, is (...)
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  11.  27
    Stephen T. Asma (2012). Affective Neuroscience and the Philosophy of Self. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19.
    The nature of self awareness and the origin and persistence of personal identity still loom large in contemporary philosophy of mind. Many philosophers have been wooed by the computational approach to consciousness, and they attempt to find the self amidst the phenomenon of neocortical information processing. Affective neuroscience offers another pathway to understanding the evolution and nature of self. This paper explores how affective neuroscience acts as a positive game-changer in the philosophical pursuit of self. In (...)
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  12.  5
    Anna Mudde (2015). Self‐Images and “Perspicuous Representations”: Reflection, Philosophy, and the Glass Mirror. Metaphilosophy 46 (4-5):539-554.
    Reflection names the central activity of Western philosophical practice; the mirror and its attendant metaphors of reflection are omnipresent in the self-image of Western philosophy and in metaphilosophical reflection on reflection. But the physical experiences of being reflected by glass mirrors have been inadequately theorized contributors to those metaphors, and this has implications not only for the self-image and the self of philosophy but also for metaphilosophical practice. This article begins to rethink the metaphor of reflection anew. (...)
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  13. David E. Klemm & Günter Zöller (eds.) (1997). Figuring the Self: Subject, Absolute, and Others in Classical German Philosophy. State University of New York Press.
    Provides a systematic overview of the topic of self in classical German philosophy, focusing on the period around 1800 and covering Kant, Fichte, Holderlin, Novalis, Schelling, Schleiermacher, and Hegel.
     
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  14.  1
    Steven James Bartlett (1980). Self-Reference, Phenomenology, and Philosophy of Science. Methodology and Science: Interdisciplinary Journal for the Empirical Study of the Foundations of Science and Their Methodology 13 (3):143-167.
    The paper begins by acknowledging that weakened systematic precision in phenomenology has made its application in philosophy of science obscure and ineffective. The defining aspirations of early transcendental phenomenology are, however, believed to be important ones. A path is therefore explored that attempts to show how certain recent developments in the logic of self-reference fulfill in a clear and more rigorous fashion in the context of philosophy of science certain of the early hopes of phenomenologists. The resulting dual approach (...)
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  15.  1
    Troy Wilson Organ (1964). The Self in Indian Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 14 (3):380-382.
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  16.  19
    S. K. Leung (2000). Nature of the Self: A Philosophy on Human Nature. Empiricus.
    CHAPTER ONE Paving a Way for a Treatise Identity Those who are not of the philosophical persuasion may find it surprising that the Self appears to be such ...
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  17. Gerard J. P. O'Daly (1973). Plotinus' Philosophy of the Self. New York,Barnes & Noble Books.
     
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  18. Absar Ahmad (1986). Concept of Self and Self-Identity in Contemporary Philosophy: An Affirmation of Iqbal's Doctrine. Iqbal Academy Pakistan.
     
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  19. Śaṅkarācārya (2012). Self Knowledge: Adi Shankaracharya's 68 Verse Treatise on the Philosophy of Nondualism: The Absolute Oneness of Ultimate Reality. New Age Books.
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  20. Nikunja Vihari Banerjee (1974). Kant's Philosophy of the Self. Arnold-Heinemann Publishers.
     
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  21. William H. Bruening (1974). Self, Society, and the Search for Transcendence: An Introduction to Philosophy. Palo Alto, Calif.]National Press Books.
     
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  22. Francis V. Catalina (1968). A Study of the Self Concept of Sāṅkhya Yoga Philosophy. Delhi, Munshiram Manoharlal.
     
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  23. A. P. Craig (2005). What is the Self?: A Philosophy of Psychology. Edwin Mellen Press.
  24. Roy Eugene Davis (2012). Self Knowledge: Adi Shankaracharya's 68 Verse Treatise on the Philosophy of Nondualism: The Absolute Oneness of Ultimate Reality. New Age Books.
     
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  25. John Cantwell Kiley (1974). The Art of Self-Rescue: A Manual in Clinical Philosophy. Finisterre Books.
     
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  26. Walter LaCentra (1987). The Authentic Self: Toward a Philosophy of Personality. P. Lang.
     
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  27.  11
    Pauliina Remes & Juha Sihvola (eds.) (2008). Ancient Philosophy of the Self. Springer.
    This collection studies the various ways and conceptual frameworks with which the ancients approached selfhood.
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  28. Kāliprasāda Siṃha (1991). The Self in Indian Philosophy. Punthi Pustak.
     
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  29. A. K. Srivastava (1976). God and its Relation with the Finite Self in Tagore's Philosophy. Oriental Publishers.
     
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  30. Gummaraju Srinivasan (1974). The Self and its Ideals in East-West Philosophy. College Book House.
  31. Christine James (1998). Irrationality in Philosophy and Psychology: The Moral Implications of Self-Defeating Behavior. Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (2):224-234.
    The philosophical study of irrationality can yield interesting insights into the human mind. One provocative issue is self-defeating behaviours, i.e. behaviours that result in failure to achieve one’s apparent goals and ambitions. In this paper I consider a self-defeating behaviour called choking under pressure, explain why it should be considered irrational, and how it is best understood with reference to skills. Then I describe how choking can be explained without appeal to a purely Freudian subconscious or ‘sub-agents’ view (...)
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  32. Christopher Gill (1996). Personality in Greek Epic, Tragedy, and Philosophy: The Self in Dialogue. Clarendon Press.
    This is a major study of conceptions of selfhood and personality in Homer and Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. The focus is on the norms of personality in Greek psychology and ethics. Gill argues that the key to understanding Greek thought of this type is to counteract the subjective and individualistic aspects of our own thinking about the person. He defines an "objective-participant" conception of personality, symbolized by the idea of the person as an interlocutor in a series of psychological and (...)
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  33.  43
    D. W. Hamlyn (1983). Perception, Learning, and the Self: Essays in the Philosophy of Psychology. Routledge & K. Paul.
    INTRODUCTION If there is one underlying implication in the following essays it is the inadequacy of the information-processing model for cognitive ...
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  34.  20
    Robert C. Solomon (1996). Self, Deception, and Self-Deception in Philosophy. In Roger T. Ames & Wimal Dissanayake (eds.), Self and Deception: A Cross-Cultural Philosophical Enquiry. Albany: SUNY Press 15.
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  35.  7
    Karl Ameriks & Dieter Sturma (eds.) (1995). The Modern Subject: Conceptions of the Self in Classical German Philosophy. State University of New York Press.
    Provides a thorough background study of the postmodern assault on the standpoint of the subject as a foundation for philosophy, and assesses what remains today of the philosophy of subjectivity.
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  36.  7
    Henri Atlan (2011). Selected Writings on Self-Organization, Philosophy, Bioethics, and Judaism. Fordham University Press.
    Self-organization -- Organisms, finalisms, programs, machines -- Spinoza -- Judaism, determinism, and rationalities -- Fabricating the living -- Ethics.
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  37. Maurice Alexander Natanson (1970). The Journeying Self a Study in Philosophy and Social Role. Addison-Wesley Pub. Co.
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  38.  71
    Colette Sciberras (2002). Deep Ecology and Ecofeminism: The Self in Environmental Philosophy. Dissertation, Lancaster
    I consider the issue of the self and its relation to the environment, focusing on the accounts given in ecofeminism and deep ecology. Though both stress the relatedness of the human self to nature, these accounts differ in various ways. Ecofeminism stresses the value of personal relations with particular others, whereas deep ecology argues that we should expand our sense of self to include all natural others and the whole of nature. Deep ecology’s views on the (...), which are loosely based on scientific ecology, are examined further and I argue that the implications are that selves are not to be seen as static things but rather as processes, and as constituted by their relations with others. This understanding of the self, I argue, enriches both deep ecology and ecofeminism’s claims on selfhood, and will enable the resolution of some of the difficulties they perceive in each other’s account. (shrink)
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  39.  62
    Kourken Michaelian (2015). The Philosophy of Metacognition: Mental Agency and Self-Awareness By Joëlle Proust. Analysis 75 (2):349-351.
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  40. Richard Eldridge, Martha C. Nussbaum & Frank Palmer (1998). On Moral Personhood: Philosophy, Literature, Criticism, and Self-Understanding. Journal of Religious Ethics 26 (2):409-431.
    Frank Palmer, Richard Eldridge, and Martha Nussbaum explore the contributions that imaginative literature can make to ethics. From three different moral philosophical perspectives, they argue that reading literature can help persons to achieve greater moral understanding. This essay examines how each author conceives of moral understanding, particularly in its emotional dimension, and how each thinks that reading literature can promote moral understanding. The essay also considers some implications of this work for religious ethics.
     
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  41. Sibapada Chakravarti (1961). Philosophy and Self-Consciousness. Philosophical Quarterly (India) 33 (January):223-229.
     
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  42. Yoram Lubling (2011). The Person Vanishes: John Dewey's Philosophy of Experience and the Self. Peter Lang.
     
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  43. Donald Phillip Verene (1997). Philosophy and the Return to Self-Knowledge. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  44. Alan G. Soble (2003). The History of Sexual Anatomy and Self-Referential Philosophy of Science. Metaphilosophy 34 (3):229-249.
    This essay is a case study of the self-destruction that occurs in the work of a social-constructionist historian of science who embraces a radical philosophy of science. It focuses on Thomas Laqueur's Making Sex: Body and Gender from the Greeks to Freud in arguing that a history of science committed to the social construction of science and to the central theses of Kuhnian, Duhemian, and Quinean philosophy of science is incoherent through self-reference. Laqueur's text is examined in detail (...)
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  45. Evan Thompson & Stephen Batchelor (2014). Waking, Dreaming, Being: Self and Consciousness in Neuroscience, Meditation, and Philosophy. Cup.
    A renowned philosopher of the mind, also known for his groundbreaking work on Buddhism and cognitive science, Evan Thompson combines the latest neuroscience research on sleep, dreaming, and meditation with Indian and Western philosophy of the mind, casting new light on the self and its relation to the brain. Thompson shows how the self is a changing process, not a static thing. When we are awake we identify with our body, but if we let our mind wander or (...)
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  46.  94
    Leah Kalmanson (2010). Levinas in Japan: The Ethics of Alterity and the Philosophy of No-Self. Continental Philosophy Review 43 (2):193-206.
    Does the Buddhist doctrine of no-self imply, simply put, no-other? Does this doctrine necessarily come into conflict with an ethics premised on the alterity of the other? This article explores these questions by situating Emmanuel Levinas’s ethics in the context of contemporary Japanese philosophy. The work of twentieth-century Japanese philosopher Watsuji Tetsurō provides a starting point from which to consider the ethics of the self-other relation in light of the Buddhist notion of emptiness. The philosophy of thirteenth-century Zen (...)
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  47. Joshua Landy (2004). Philosophy as Fiction: Self, Deception, and Knowledge in Proust. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophy as Fiction seeks to account for the peculiar power of philosophical literature by taking as its case study the paradigmatic generic hybrid of the twentieth century, Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time. At once philosophical--in that it presents claims, and even deploys arguments concerning such traditionally philosophical issues as knowledge, self-deception, selfhood, love, friendship, and art--and literary, in that its situations are imaginary and its stylization inescapably prominent, Proust's novel presents us with a conundrum. How should it (...)
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  48.  6
    L. M. Demchenko (2008). Phenomenon of Self-Alienation of Culture as a Basis of Transformations of Philosophy in the Present-Day World. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 36:7-12.
    This article covers issues illustrating determining significance of philosophy as a theoretical reflection over the utmost bases of culture as well as processes, conditioned by phenomena of alienation and self-alienation of culture, resulting in its integrity, uniqueness and originality demolition. This, in its turn, definitely leads to various kinds of deformation of philosophic reflection. The most important tendency in subduing the crisis of culture and philosophy is to project a new type of philosophizing, represented in the critical philosophy of (...)
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  49. L. M. Demchenko (2008). Phenomenon of Self-Alienation of Culture as a Basis of Transformations of Philosophy in the Present-Day World. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 36:7-12.
    This article covers issues illustrating determining significance of philosophy as a theoretical reflection over the utmost bases of culture as well as processes, conditioned by phenomena of alienation and self-alienation of culture, resulting in its integrity, uniqueness and originality demolition. This, in its turn, definitely leads to various kinds of deformation of philosophic reflection. The most important tendency in subduing the crisis of culture and philosophy is to project a new type of philosophizing, represented in the critical philosophy of (...)
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  50.  76
    Thupten Jinpa (2002). Self, Reality and Reason in Tibetan Philosophy: Tsongkhapa's Quest for the Middle Way. Routledgecurzon.
    The work explores the historical and intellectual context of Tsongkhapa's philosophy and addresses the critical issues related to questions of development and originality in Tsongkhapa's thought. It also deals extensively with one of Tsongkhapa's primary concerns, namely his attempts to demonstrate that the Middle Way philosophy's de-constructive analysis does not negate the reality of the everyday world. The study's central focus, however, is the question of the existence and the nature of self. This is explored both in terms of (...)
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