Search results for 'Self Concept' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Serife Tekin (2011). Self-Concept Through the Diagnostic Looking Glass: Narratives and Mental Disorder. Philosophical Psychology 24 (3):357-380.
    This paper explores how the diagnosis of mental disorder may affect the diagnosed subject’s self-concept by supplying an account that emphasizes the influence of autobiographical and social narratives on self-understanding. It focuses primarily on the diagnoses made according to the criteria provided by the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), and suggests that the DSM diagnosis may function as a source of narrative that affects the subject’s self-concept. Engaging in this analysis by appealing to (...)
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  2.  25
    Bahtışen Kavak, Eda Gürel, Canan Eryiğit & Öznur Özkan Tektaş (2009). Examining the Effects of Moral Development Level, Self-Concept, and Self-Monitoring on Consumers' Ethical Attitudes. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):115 - 135.
    This study investigates the possible effects of self-concept, self-monitoring, and moral development level on dimensions of consumers' ethical attitudes. "Actively benefiting from illegal activities," "actively benefiting from deceptive practices," and "no harm/no foul 1—2" are defined by factor analysis as four dimensions of Turkish consumers' ethical attitudes. Logistic regression analysis is applied to data collected from 516 Turkish households. Results indicate that self-monitoring and moral development level predicted consumer ethics in relation to "actively benefiting from questionable (...)
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  3.  10
    Ursula Naue (2008). 'Self-Care Without a Self': Alzheimer's Disease and the Concept of Personal Responsibility for Health. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (3):315-324.
    The article focuses on the impact of the concept of self-care on persons who are understood as incapable of self-care due to their physical and/or mental ‘incapacity’. The article challenges the idea of this health care concept as empowerment and highlights the difficulties for persons who do not fit into this concept. To exemplify this, the self-care concept is discussed with regard to persons with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In the case of persons with (...)
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  4. Marie Guillot (forthcoming). Thinking of Oneself as the Thinker: The Concept of Self and the Phenomenology of Intellection. Philosophical Explorations.
    The indexical word “I” has traditionally been assumed to be an overt analogue to the concept of self, and the best model for understanding it. This approach, I argue, overlooks the essential role of cognitive phenomenology in the mastery of the concept of self. I suggest that a better model is to be found in a different kind of representation: phenomenal concepts or more generally phenomenally grounded concepts. I start with what I take to be the (...)
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  5.  21
    Robert W. Mitchell (1997). Kinesthetic-Visual Matching and the Self-Concept as Explanations of Mirror-Self-Recognition. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 27 (1):17–39.
    Since its inception as a topic of inquiry, mirror-self-recognition has usually been explained by two models: one, initiated by Guillaume, proposes that mirror-self-recognition depends upon kinesthetic-visual matching, and the other, initiated by Gallup, that self-recognition depends upon a self-concept. These two models are examined historically and conceptually. This examination suggests that the kinesthetic-visual matching model is conceptually coherent and makes reasonable and accurate predictions; and that the self-concept model is conceptually incoherent and makes (...)
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  6.  27
    Liane Young, Alek Chakroff & Jessica Tom (2012). Doing Good Leads to More Good: The Reinforcing Power of a Moral Self-Concept. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (3):325-334.
    What is the role of self-concept in motivating moral behavior? On one account, when people are primed to perceive themselves as “do-gooders”, conscious access to this positive self-concept will reinforce good behavior. On an alternative account, when people are reminded that they have done their “good deed for the day”, they will feel licensed to behave worse. In the current study, when participants were asked to recall their own good deeds (positive self-concept), their subsequent (...)
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  7. John Bickle (2003). Empirical Evidence for a Narrative Concept of Self. In Gary D. Fireman, T. E. McVay & Owen J. Flanagan (eds.), Narrative and Consciousness. Oxford University Press
  8.  48
    Alain Morin (1995). Preliminary Data On a Relation Between Self-Talk and Complexity of the Self-Concept '. Psychological Reports 76:267-272.
    Summary.— Recent empirical work in social cognition suggests that in building a self-concept people make inferences about themselves based on overt behavior or private thoughts and feelings. This article addresses the question of how, exactly, people make these inferences about themselves and raises the possibility that they do so through self-talk. It is proposed that the more on talks to oneself to construct a selfimage, the more this image will gain coherence and sophistication. A correlational study was (...)
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  9.  5
    Angeliki Leondari (1993). Comparability of SelfConcept Among Normal Achievers, Low Achievers and Children with Learning Difficulties. Educational Studies 19 (3):357-371.
    Selfconcept ratings of normally and low achieving students in regular classes were compared with those of children facing academic difficulties and attending special education classes. Children's perceptions of scholastic competence and feelings of global self‐worth were measured using the Perceived Competence Scale for Children . Participants in the study were 424 children enrolled in the third to sixth primary school grades. Results indicated that special class children rated themselves more negatively than their normally achieving peers on both (...)
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  10.  7
    Larry L. Thomas (1978). Morality and Our Self-Concept. Journal of Value Inquiry 12 (4):258-268.
    One of the most important aspects of our lives is the conception which we have of ourselves. For the way in which we view ourselves fundamentally affects how we interact among others and, most importantly perhaps, how we think others should treat us. For instance, one will not expect others to regard one as having a high mathematical acumen if one. realizes that one's mathematical skills are very minimal. Of course, persons may be mistaken in their assessment of themselves. And (...)
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  11.  5
    Suzana Mlinar, Matej Tušak & Damir Karpljuk (2009). Self-Concept in Intensive Care Nurses and Control Group Women. Nursing Ethics 16 (3):328-339.
    Our self-concept is how we see ourselves in our minds. The goal of this research was to discover any significant differences in the dimensions of self-concept between clinical nurses employed in an intensive care unit in Slovenia and Slovenian women from the general population, who represented the control group. The research included 603 women aged 20—40 years (mean 29.94; standard deviation ±6.0) who had a high-school education. To determine the differences between the groups statistically we used (...)
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  12.  4
    C. M. Rubie-Davies & K. Lee (2012). Self-Concept of Students in Higher Education: Are There Differences by Faculty and Gender? Educational Studies 39 (1):56-67.
    Many studies examine student self-concept during compulsory schooling but few have explored the self-concept of students in higher educational settings. The current study examined self-concept by faculty and gender among higher education students in New Zealand. Participants were 929 undergraduate students from a large New Zealand university. The results showed some differences in verbal and maths self-concept by faculty. Generally, students in faculties teaching subjects more reliant on maths skills had higher maths (...)
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  13.  2
    James S. Raw & Kevin Marjoribanks (1991). Family and School Correlates of Adolescents’ Creativity, Morality and Self Concept. Educational Studies 17 (2):183-190.
    This study examined relationships between adolescents’ perceptions of their family and school environments and measures of their creativity, morality and self concept. Parallel forms of environment schedules were used to assess the social‐psychological contexts of families and schools. Data were collected from 312 16 year‐old Australian students. Using commonality analyses, the results indicated that adolescents’ self concept and morality have moderate associations with their perceptions of family environments and more modest relationships with their perceptions of school (...)
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  14.  2
    Tracy Watson & Deon de Bruin (2006). Getting Under the Skin: The Inscription of Dermatological Disease on the Self-Concept. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 6 (1).
    Psychological factors have long been associated with the onset, maintenance and exacerbation of many cutaneous disorders (Newell, 2000, p. 8; Papadopoulos, Bor & Legg, 1999, p. 107). Chronic cutaneous disease is often visible to others so that social factors in coping and adjustment are thus highly relevant (Papadopoulos, et al., 1999, p. 107). Psychological factors tend, however, to be overlooked in the dermatological treatment domain when the skin problem is not regarded as life threatening (MacGregor, 1990 as cited in Papadopoulos, (...)
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  15.  70
    Kristina Musholt (2012). Concepts or Metacognition - What is the Issue? Commentary on Stephane Savanah’s “The Concept Possession Hypothesis of Self-Consciousness”. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):721-722.
    The author claims that concept possession is not only necessary but also sufficient for self-consciousness, where self-consciousness is understood as the awareness of oneself as a self. Further, he links concept possession to intelligent behavior. His ultimate aim is to provide a framework for the study of self-consciousness in infants and non-human animals. I argue that the claim that all concepts are necessarily related to the self-concept remains unconvincing and suggest that what (...)
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  16. Francis V. Catalina (1968). A Study of the Self Concept of Sāṅkhya Yoga Philosophy. Delhi, Munshiram Manoharlal.
     
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  17.  49
    Anthony Greenwald, A Unified Theory of Implicit Attitudes, Stereotypes, Self-Esteem, and Self-Concept.
    This theoretical integration of social psychology’s main cognitive and affective constructs was shaped by 3 influences: (a) recent widespread interest in automatic and implicit cognition, (b) development of the Implicit Association Test (IAT; A. G. Greenwald, D. E. McGhee, & J. L. K. Schwartz, 1998), and (c) social psychology’s consistency theories of the 1950s, especially F. Heider’s (1958) balance theory. The balanced identity design is introduced as a method to test correlational predictions of the theory. Data obtained with this method (...)
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  18.  37
    Alex Watson (2010). Bhaṭṭa Rāmakaṇṭha's Elaboration of Self-Awareness ( Svasaṃvedana ), and How It Differs From Dharmakīrti's Exposition of the Concept. Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (3):297-321.
    The article considers what happened to the Buddhist concept of self-awareness ( svasaṃvedana ) when it was appropriated by Śaiva Siddhānta. The first section observes how it was turned against Buddhism by being used to attack the momentariness of consciousenss and to establish its permanence. The second section examines how self-awareness differs from I-cognition ( ahampratyaya ). The third section examines the difference between the kind of self-awareness elaborated by Rāmakaṇṭha (‘reflexive awareness’) and a kind elaborated (...)
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  19.  12
    Michael H. Kernis & Brian M. Goldman (2003). Stability and Variability in Self-Concept and Self-Esteem. In Mark R. Leary & June Price Tangney (eds.), Handbook of Self and Identity. Guilford Press 106--127.
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  20.  30
    Victoria I. Burke (2005). Hegel's Concept of Mutual Recognition: The Limits of Self-Determination. Philosophical Forum 36 (2):213-220.
    For Hegel, the ideal relation that two self-conscious beings might have to each other is one of reciprocal mutual recognition. According to Hegel, “a self-consciousness exists for [another] consciousness.” That is, self-consciousness is defined by its being recognized as self-conscious by another self-consciousness. In one formulation, Robert Pippin says that this means that “being a free agent consists in being recognized as one.” However, at the same time, Hegel values self-determination, which suggests a fundamental (...)
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  21.  9
    Jean Ashmead Perkins (1969). The Concept of the Self in the French Enlightenment. Genève, Droz.
    Chapter I PHILOSOPHICAL CONCEPTS AND DEFINITIONS The concept of the self has been termed one of the persistent problems in philosophy1. ...
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  22.  5
    Hazel R. Markus & Shinobu Kitayama (1991). Cultural Variation in the Self-Concept. In J. Strauss (ed.), The Self: Interdisciplinary Approaches. Springer-Verlag 18--48.
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  23.  17
    Michelle N. Shiota, Dacher Keltner & Amanda Mossman (2007). The Nature of Awe: Elicitors, Appraisals, and Effects on Self-Concept. Cognition and Emotion 21 (5):944-963.
  24.  7
    Stephane Savanah (2012). The Concept Possession Hypothesis of Self-Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):713-720.
    This paper presents the hypothesis that concept possession is sufficient and necessary for self-consciousness. If this is true it provides a yardstick for gauging the validity of different research paradigms in which claims for self-consciousness in animals or human infants are made: a convincing demonstration of concept possession in a research subject, such as a display of inferential reasoning, may be taken as conclusive evidence of self-consciousness. Intuitively, there appears to be a correlation between intelligence (...)
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  25.  18
    Catherine Sebastian, Stephanie Burnett & Sarah-Jayne Blakemore (2008). Development of the Self-Concept During Adolescence. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (11):441-446.
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  26.  33
    Constance E. Roland & Richard M. Foxx (2003). Self-Respect: A Neglected Concept. Philosophical Psychology 16 (2):247 – 288.
    Although neglected by psychology, self-respect has been an integral part of philosophical discussion since Aristotle and continues to be a central issue in contemporary moral philosophy. Within this tradition, self-respect is considered to be based on one's capacity for rationality and leads to behaviors that promote autonomy, such as independence, self-control and tenacity. Self-respect elicits behaviors that one should be treated with respect and requires the development and pursuit of personal standards and life plans that are (...)
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  27.  15
    Leticia Ancer & Mónica T. González (2010). Relación Entre Auto Concepto y Apoyo Social En Estudiantes Universitarios (Relation Between Self Concept and Social Support in College Students). Daena 5 (2):298-307.
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  28.  33
    Joseph Kupfer (1987). Privacy, Autonomy, and Self-Concept. American Philosophical Quarterly 24 (1):81 - 89.
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  29.  11
    M. Panimalar Roja, N. Sasikumar & M. Parimala Fathima (2013). A Study on Emotional Maturity and Self Concept at Higher Secondary Level. Science and Education 1 (5):81-83.
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  30.  6
    Joshua Aronson & Claude M. Steele (2005). Stereotypes and the Fragility of Academic Competence, Motivation, and Self-Concept. In Andrew J. Elliot & Carol S. Dweck (eds.), Handbook of Competence and Motivation. The Guilford Press 436--456.
  31. David A. DeSteno (1997). Of the Self-Concept David A. DeSteno and Peter Salovey. Cognition and Emotion 2 (4).
     
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  32.  16
    Alisa Mandrigin, Concept of Self : Thinking of Oneself as a Subject of Thought.
    We can think about ourselves in a variety of ways, but only some of the thoughts that we entertain about ourselves will be thoughts which we know concern ourselves. I call these first-person thoughts, and the component of such thoughts that picks out the object about which one is thinking—oneself—the self-concept. In this thesis I am concerned with providing an account of the content of the self-concept. The challenge is to provide an account that meets two (...)
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  33.  3
    John H. Mueller & Michael J. Ross (1984). Uniqueness of the Self-Concept Across the Life Span. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 22 (2):83-86.
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  34.  4
    David A. DeSteno & Peter Salovey (1997). The Effects of Mood on the Structure of the Self-Concept. Cognition and Emotion 11 (4):351-372.
  35.  3
    Mark W. Baldwin, Jodene R. Baccus & Marina Milyavskaya (2010). Computer Game Associating Self-Concept to Images of Acceptance Can Reduce Adolescents' Aggressiveness in Response to Social Rejection. Cognition and Emotion 24 (5):855-862.
  36.  1
    Takeshi Kanasugi (2012). Paradoxes of Self-Deception and the Multiple Aspects of the Self-Concept. Kagaku Tetsugaku 45 (2):47-63.
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  37. Robert G. Kunzendorf, S. M. Beltz & G. Tymowicz (1992). Self-Awareness in Autistic Subjects and Deeply Hypnotized Subjects: Dissociation of Self-Concept Versus Self-Consciousness. Imagination, Cognition and Personality 11:129-41.
  38.  2
    J. Steve Oliver & Ronald D. Simpson (1988). Influences of Attitude Toward Science, Achievement Motivation, and Science Self Concept on Achievement in Science: A Longitudinal Study. Science Education 72 (2):143-155.
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  39.  10
    Ira Finkel (1990). Self Concept and World Vision. Inquiry 6 (4):1-1.
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  40.  2
    William D. Spears & Mary Ellen Deese (1973). Self-Concept as Cause. Educational Theory 23 (2):144-152.
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  41.  4
    Peter Häussler & Lore Hoffmann (2000). A Curricular Frame for Physics Education: Development, Comparison with Students' Interests, and Impact on Students' Achievement and SelfConcept. Science Education 84 (6):689-705.
  42.  4
    John B. Pittenger & Linda Musun Baskett (1984). Facial Self-Perception: Its Relation to Objective Appearance and Self-Concept. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 22 (3):167-170.
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  43.  10
    René L'Ecuyer (1975). Self-Concept Investigation: Demystification Process. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 6 (1):17-30.
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  44.  7
    Russell E. Ames (1975). A Methodology of Inquiry for Self Concept. Educational Theory 25 (3):314-322.
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  45.  1
    John D. Herzog (1973). Initiation and High School In the Development of Kikuyu Youths' SelfConcept. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 1 (4):478-489.
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  46.  1
    Linda M. Isbell, Joseph McCabe, Kathleen C. Burns & Elicia C. Lair (2013). Who Am I?: The Influence of Affect on the Working Self-Concept. Cognition and Emotion 27 (6):1073-1090.
  47.  5
    William Kay (1972). The SelfConcept as a Moral Control. Journal of Moral Education 2 (1):63-67.
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  48. J. L. Byer (2000). Measuring the Positive Effects of Students' Perceptions of Classroom Social Climate on Academic Self-Concept. Journal of Social Studies Research 24 (1):25-34.
  49. Cathy Collins (1987). Teacher Skills with Classroom Discussion: Impact on Student Mastery of Subject Matter, Self-Concept, and Oral Expression Skills. Journal of Thought 22 (4):81-89.
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  50. John D. Herzog (1973). Initiation and High School in the Development of Kikuyu Youths' Self-Concept. Ethos 1 (4):478-489.
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