Search results for 'Self Regulation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Susan Margaret Hart (2010). Self-Regulation, Corporate Social Responsibility, and the Business Case: Do They Work in Achieving Workplace Equality and Safety? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (4):585 - 600.score: 240.0
    The political shift toward an economic liberalism in many developed market economies, emphasizing the importance of the marketplace rather than government intervention in the economy and society (Dorman, Systematic Occupational Health and Safety Management: Perspectives on an International Development, 2000; Tombs, Policy and Practice in Health and Safety 3(1): 24-25, 2005; Walters, Policy and Practice in Health and Safety 03(2):3-19, 2005), featured a prominent discourse centered on the need for business flexibility and competitiveness in a global economy (Dorman, 2000; Tombs, (...)
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  2. Peter R. Woods & David A. Lamond (2011). What Would Confucius Do? – Confucian Ethics and Self-Regulation in Management. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (4):669-683.score: 240.0
    We examined Confucian moral philosophy, primarily the Analects, to determine how Confucian ethics could help managers regulate their own behavior (self-regulation) to maintain an ethical standard of practice. We found that some Confucian virtues relevant to self-regulation are common to Western concepts of management ethics such as benevolence, righteousness, wisdom, and trustworthiness. Some are relatively unique, such as ritual propriety and filial piety. We identify seven Confucian principles and discuss how they apply to achieving ethical (...)-regulation in management. In addition, we examined some of the unique Confucian practices to achieve self-regulation including ritual and music. We balanced the framework by exploring the potential problems in applying Confucian principles to develop ethical self-regulation including whistle blowing. Confucian moral philosophy offers an indigenous Chinese theoretical framework for developing ethical self-regulation in managers. This is relevant for managers and those who relate to managers in Confucian-oriented societies, such as China, Korea, Japan, and Singapore. We recommend further research to examine if the application of the Confucian practices outlined here actually work in regulating the ethical behavior of managers in modern organizations. (shrink)
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  3. Wayne Norman (2011). Business Ethics as Self-Regulation: Why Principles That Ground Regulations Should Be Used to Ground Beyond-Compliance Norms as Well. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 102 (S1):43-57.score: 240.0
    Theories of business ethics or corporate responsibility tend to focus on justifying obligations that go above and beyond what is required by law. This article examines the curious fact that most business ethics scholars use concepts, principles, and normative methods for identifying and justifying these beyond-compliance obligations that are very different from the ones that are used to set the levels of regulations themselves. Its modest proposal—a plea for a research agenda, really—is that we could reduce this normative asymmetry by (...)
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  4. Belinda Reeve (2013). Private Governance, Public Purpose? Assessing Transparency and Accountability in Self-Regulation of Food Advertising to Children. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (2):149-163.score: 240.0
    Reducing non-core food advertising to children is an important priority in strategies to address childhood obesity. Public health researchers argue for government intervention on the basis that food industry self-regulation is ineffective; however, the industry contends that the existing voluntary scheme adequately addresses community concerns. This paper examines the operation of two self-regulatory initiatives governing food advertising to children in Australia, in order to determine whether these regulatory processes foster transparent and accountable self-regulation. The paper (...)
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  5. Ayla Barutchu, Olivia Carter, Robert Hester & Neil Levy (2013). Strength in Cognitive Self-Regulation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    Failures in self-regulation are predictive of adverse cognitive, academic and vocational outcomes, yet the interplay between cognition and self-regulation failure remains elusive. Two experiments tested the hypothesis that lapses in self-regulation, as predicted by the strength model, can be induced in individuals using cognitive paradigms and whether such failures are related to cognitive performance. In Experiments 1, the stop-signal task (SST) was used to show reduced behavioural inhibition after performance of a cognitively demanding arithmetic (...)
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  6. Jeffrey M. Schwartz, Henry P. Stapp & Mario Beauregard (2004). The Volitional Influence of the Mind on the Brain, with Special Reference to Emotional Self-Regulation. In Mario Beauregard (ed.), Consciousness, Emotional Self-Regulation and the Brain. John Benjamins. 195-238.score: 240.0
  7. John M. Braxton & Leonard L. Baird (2001). Preparation for Professional Self-Regulation. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (4):593-610.score: 240.0
    This article asserts that graduate study should include preparation for participation in the process of self-regulation to assure the responsible conduct of research in the scientific community. This article outlines the various ways in which doctoral study can incorporate such preparation. These suggested ways include the inculcation of general attitudes and values about professional self-regulation, various ways doctoral study can be configured so that future scientists are prepared to participate in the deterrence, detection and sanctioning of (...)
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  8. Patrick L. Taylor (2009). Scientific Self-Regulation—so Good, How Can It Fail? Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (3):395-406.score: 240.0
    To be a functional alternative to government regulation, self-regulation of science must be credible to both scientists and the public, accountable, ethical, and effective. According to some, serious problems continue in research ethics in the United States despite a rich history of proposed self-regulatory standards and oversight devices. Successful efforts at self-regulation in stem cell research contrast with unsuccessful efforts in research ethics, particularly conflicts of interest. Part of the cause for a lack of (...)
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  9. [deleted]David A. Silbersweig David R. Vago (2012). Self-Awareness, Self-Regulation, and Self-Transcendence (S-ART): A Framework for Understanding the Neurobiological Mechanisms of Mindfulness. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 240.0
    Mindfulness - as a state, trait, process, type of meditation, and intervention has proven to be beneficial across a diverse group of psychological disorders as well as for general stress reduction. Yet, there remains a lack of clarity in the operationalization of this construct, and underlying mechanisms. Here, we provide an integrative theoretical framework and systems-based neurobiological model that explains the mechanisms by which mindfulness reduces biases related to self-processing and creates a sustainable healthy mind. Mindfulness is described through (...)
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  10. [deleted]Stefon J. R. Van Noordt & Sidney J. Segalowitz (2012). Performance Monitoring and the Medial Prefrontal Cortex: A Review of Individual Differences and Context Effects as a Window on Self-Regulation. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:197-197.score: 240.0
    The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is central to self-regulation and has been implicated in generating a cluster of event-related potential components, collectively referred to as medial frontal negativities (MFNs). These MFNs are elicited while individuals monitor behavioural and environmental consequences, and include the error-related negativity, Nogo N2, and the feedback-related negativity. A growing cognitive and affective neuroscience literature indicates that the activation of the anterior cingulate cortex and surrounding medial prefrontal regions during performance monitoring is not only influenced (...)
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  11. Raphael Cohen-Almagor (forthcoming). Press Self-Regulation in Britain: A Critique. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-23.score: 240.0
    This article reviews the history of press self-regulation in Britain, from the 1947 Ross Commission to the 2012 Leveson Inquiry Commission. It considers the history of the Press Council and the Press Complaints Commission, analysing the ways they developed, their work, and how they have reached their current non-status. It is argued that the existing situation in Britain is far from satisfactory, and that the press should advance more elaborate mechanisms of self-control, establishing a new regulatory body (...)
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  12. Mirjam Weis, Tobias Heikamp & Gisela Trommsdorff (2013). Gender Differences in School Achievement: The Role of Self-Regulation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    This study examined whether different aspects of self-regulation (i.e., emotion and behavior regulation) account for gender differences in German and mathematics achievement. Specifically, we investigated whether higher school achievement by girls in comparison to boys can be explained by self-regulation. German and mathematics achievement were assessed in a sample of 53 German fifth graders (19 boys, 34 girls) using formal academic performance tests (i.e., reading, writing, mathematics) and teachers’ ratings (i.e., grades in German and mathematics). (...)
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  13. Mario Beauregard, Johanne Lévesque & Vincent Paquette (2004). Neural Basis of Conscious and Voluntary Self-Regulation of Emotion. In , Consciousness, Emotional Self-Regulation and the Brain. Advances in Consciousness Research. John Benjamins. 163-194.score: 240.0
  14. Merold Westphal & Giacomo A. Bonanno (2004). Emotion Self-Regulation. In Simon C. Moore & Mike Oaksford (eds.), Consciousness, Emotional Self-Regulation and the Brain. John Benjamins.score: 240.0
     
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  15. Dacher Keltner & Jennifer S. Beer (2005). Self-Conscious Emotion and Self-Regulation. In Abraham Tesser, Joanne V. Wood & Diederik A. Stapel (eds.), On Building, Defending and Regulating the Self: A Psychological Perspective. Psychology Press. 197-215.score: 222.0
  16. Mario Beauregard (ed.) (2004). Consciousness, Emotional Self-Regulation and the Brain. John Benjamins.score: 216.0
  17. Anne Joosten, Marius van Dijke, Alain Van Hiel & David De Cremer (2013). Feel Good, Do-Good!? On Consistency and Compensation in Moral Self-Regulation. Journal of Business Ethics:1-14.score: 216.0
    Studies in the behavioral ethics and moral psychology traditions have begun to reveal the important roles of self-related processes that underlie moral behavior. Unfortunately, this research has resulted in two distinct and opposing streams of findings that are usually referred to as moral consistency and moral compensation. Moral consistency research shows that a salient self-concept as a moral person promotes moral behavior. Conversely, moral compensation research reveals that a salient self-concept as an immoral person promotes moral behavior. (...)
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  18. Douglas F. Watt (2004). Consciousness, Emotional Self-Regulation and the Brain: Review Article. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (9):77-82.score: 210.0
  19. Mario Beauregard, Johanne Lévesque & Pierre Bourgouin (2001). Neural Correlates of Conscious Self-Regulation of Emotion. Journal of Neuroscience 21 (18):6993-7000.score: 210.0
  20. Peter Martin Jaworski (2013). An Absurd Tax on Our Fellow Citizens: The Ethics of Rent Seeking in the Market Failures (or Self-Regulation) Approach. Journal of Business Ethics (3):1-10.score: 210.0
    Joseph Heath lumps in quotas and protectionist measures with cartelization, taking advantage of information asymmetries, seeking a monopoly position, and so on, as all instances of behavior that can lead to market failures in his market failures approach to business ethics. The problem is that this kind of rent and rent seeking, when they fail to deliver desirable outcomes, are better described as government failure. I suggest that this means we will have to expand Heath’s framework to a market and (...)
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  21. Jack Martin & Ann-Marie McLellan (2008). The Educational Psychology of Self-Regulation: A Conceptual and Critical Analysis. Studies in Philosophy and Education 27 (6):433-448.score: 210.0
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  22. M. Tops, M. A. Boksem, P. Luu & D. M. Tucker (2009). Brain Substrates of Behavioral Programs Associated with Self-Regulation. Frontiers in Psychology 1:152-152.score: 210.0
    The present paper proposes that four neuromodulator systems underpin highly generalized behavioral sets, but each targets either dorsomedial or ventrolateral cortical systems, where it produces its effects in either a proactive or reactive orientation to the environment. This way systems are discriminated that control reactive approach (dopaminergic), reactive avoidance (cholinergic), proactive behavior (noradrenergic) and withdrawal (serotonergic). This model is compared with models of temperament, affect, personality, and so-called two-system models from psychology. Although the present model converges with previous models that (...)
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  23. Brian Levine (2000). Self-Regulation and Autonoetic Consciousness. In Endel Tulving (ed.), Memory, Consciousness, and the Brain: The Tallinn Conference. Psychology Press/Taylor & Francis.score: 210.0
     
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  24. Nigel Nicholson (2011). The Evolved Self, Self-Regulation, and the Co-Evolution of Leadership. Biological Theory 6 (4):399-412.score: 210.0
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  25. Matthias Fink, Rainer Harms & Isabella Hatak (2012). Nanotechnology and Ethics: The Role of Regulation Versus Self-Commitment in Shaping Researchers' Behavior. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):569-581.score: 192.0
    The governance of nanotechnology seeks to limit its risks, without constraining opportunities. The literature on the effectiveness of approaches to governance has neglected approaches that impact directly on the behavior of a researcher. We analyze the effectiveness of legal regulations versus regulation via self-commitment. Then, we refine this model by analyzing competition and autonomy as key contingency factors. In the first step, qualitative interviews with nanotechnology researchers are conducted to reflect this model. In the second step, its empirical (...)
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  26. Norman E. Bowie & Karim Jamal (2006). Privacy Rights on the Internet: Self-Regulation or Government Regulation? Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (3):323-342.score: 180.0
    Abstract: Consumer surveys indicate that concerns about privacy are a principal factor discouraging consumers from shopping online. The key public policy issue regarding privacy is whether the US should follow its current self-regulation course (where the FTC encourages websites to obtain private “privacy web-seals”), or whether a European style formal legal regulation approach should be adopted in the US. We conclude that the use of assurance seals has worked reasonably well and websites should be free to decide (...)
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  27. Robert Clowes (2007). A Self-Regulation Model of Inner Speech and its Role in the Organisation of Human Conscious Experience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (7):59-71.score: 180.0
    This paper argues for the importance of inner speech in a proper understanding of the structure of human conscious experience. It reviews one recent attempt to build a model of inner speech based on a grammaticization model (Steels, 2003) and compares it with a self-regulation model here proposed. This latter model is located within the broader literature on the role of language in cognition and the inner voice in consciousness. I argue that this role is not limited to (...)
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  28. William J. Bollom (1988). Ethics and Self-Regulation for CPAs in the U.S.A. Journal of Business Ethics 7 (1-2):55 - 61.score: 180.0
    This paper explores three questions: (1) Why should Certified Public Accountants (CPAs), as a group, adhere to their code of ethics? (2) Why should an individual CPA adhere to the code? (3) Of what significance are the answers to these questions in regards to possible changes in the accounting curriculum and the CPA profession's present concern for self-regulation through quality control reviews? The paper concludes that all college accounting majors should be required to take an ethics course and (...)
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  29. Vincent Richman & Alex Richman (2012). A Tale of Two Perspectives: Regulation Versus Self-Regulation. A Financial Reporting Approach (From Sarbanes–Oxley) for Research Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):241-246.score: 180.0
    Reports of research fraud have raised concerns about research integrity similar to concerns raised about financial accounting fraud. We propose a departure from self-regulation in that researchers adopt the financial accounting approach in establishing trust through an external validation process, in addition to the reporting entities and the regulatory agencies. The general conceptual framework for reviewing financial reports, utilizes external auditors who are certified and objective in using established standards to provide an opinion on the financial reports. These (...)
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  30. Asolo Adeyeye Adewole (2007). Corporate Social Responsibility, Self-Regulation, and the Problems of Unethical Business Practices in Africa. International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:69-79.score: 180.0
    The paper examines the issue of corporate social responsibility (CSR) against the backdrop of its self-regulatory posture. Using the African experience as a case study, the paper observes that the activities of multinationals show very clearly that they are grossly irresponsible despite their professed self-regulation. Instead, the multinationals have created an image of terror due to their deep-rooted involvements in human rights abuses, environmental degradation, tax evasion, bribery, market manipulation, and other forms of unethical practices, notwithstanding their (...)
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  31. Paul Dragos Aligica (2008). The Challenge of Business Self-Regulation: Revisiting the Foundations. International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 4 (2):169-188.score: 180.0
    The rise of international businesses' self-regulation regimes offers a challenging case study for those interested in the relationship between ethics and business. Regulation without external enforcement has always been a focal point for explorations into the relationship between morality and economic behaviour. Are self-regulatory arrangements viable? Are they stable? What are the factors and conditions that determine their stability and viability? Using these questions as a vehicle, the article explores the functional anatomy of self-regulation. (...)
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  32. Nancy B. Kurland (1993). The Defense Industry Initiative: Ethics, Self-Regulation, and Accountability. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (2):137 - 145.score: 180.0
    In 1986, President Reagan created the Packard Commission, a blue-ribbon commission to investigate defense contracting procurement fraud. The Packard Commission''s major recommendation was for defense contractors to adopt ethics programs. Out of this recommendation emerged the Defense Industry Initiative (DII). This paper examines this Initiative and focuses on the DII''s six principles. In particular, this paper explores the implications the DII has had with respect to (1) pursuing intra-industry cooperation and setting industry-wide standards; (2) monitoring compliance; (3) the paradox inherent (...)
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  33. Leon de Bruin, Fleur Jongepier & Derek Strijbos (forthcoming). Mental Agency as Self-Regulation. Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-11.score: 180.0
    The article proposes a novel approach to mental agency that is inspired by Victoria McGeer’s work on self-regulation. The basic idea is that certain mental acts (e.g., judging that p) leave further work to be done for an agent to be considered an authoritative self-ascriber of corresponding dispositional mental states (e.g., believing that p). First, we discuss Richard Moran’s account of avowals, which grounds first-person authority in deliberative, self-directed agency. Although this view is promising, we argue (...)
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  34. Judith P. Swazey (1991). Are Physicians a “Delinquent Community”?: Issues in Professional Competence, Conduct, and Self-Regulation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 10 (8):581 - 590.score: 180.0
    This paper examines the moral responsibilities of physicians, toward themselves and their colleagues, their students and patients, and society, in terms of the nature and exercise of professional self-regulation. Some of the author's close encounters with cases involving research misconduct, behavioral impairment or deviance, and medical practice at the moral margin, are described to illustrate why, in Freidson's words, physicians are a delinquent community with respect to the ways they meet their responsibility to govern the competence and conduct (...)
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  35. Anne Joosten, Marius van Dijke, Alain Van Hiel & David De Cremer (2013). Being “in Control” May Make You Lose Control: The Role of Self-Regulation in Unethical Leadership Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 121 (1):1-14.score: 180.0
    In the present article, we argue that the constant pressure that leaders face may limit the willpower required to behave according to ethical norms and standards and may therefore lead to unethical behavior. Drawing upon the ego depletion and moral self-regulation literatures, we examined whether self-regulatory depletion that is contingent upon the moral identity of leaders may promote unethical leadership behavior. A laboratory experiment and a multisource field study revealed that regulatory resource depletion promotes unethical leader behaviors (...)
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  36. Lawrence J. Lad (2005). Paradoxes of Industry Self-Regulation. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:259-262.score: 180.0
    The purpose of this paper is to identify the paradoxes of industry self-regulation and to draw parallels between recent work on collaboration with the notion of control and regulation. Various examples of collaborative control are identified and self-regulation is used to illustrate how the process happens. Suggestions are offered on how collaboration is necessary for future regulatory issues.
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  37. John C. Ruhnka & Heidi Boerstler (1998). Governmental Incentives for Corporate Self Regulation. Journal of Business Ethics 17 (3):309-326.score: 180.0
    This article presents an overview of traditional legal and regulatory incentives directed at achieving lawful corporate behavior, together with examples of more recent governmental incentives aimed at encouraging self regulation activities by corporations. These incentives have been differentiated into positive incentives that benefit corporations for actions that encourage or assist lawful behavior, and punitive incentives that only punish corporations for violations of legal or regulatory standards. This analysis indicates that traditional legal and regulatory incentives for lawful corporate behavior (...)
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  38. David R. Engstrom (1976). Hypnotic Susceptibility, EEG-Alpha, and Self-Regulation. In Gary E. Schwartz & D. H. Shapiro (eds.), Consciousness and Self-Regulation. Plenum. 173--221.score: 180.0
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  39. Karin Bakracevic Vukman & Marta Licardo (2009). How Cognitive, Metacognitive, Motivational and Emotional SelfRegulation Influence School Performance in Adolescence and Early Adulthood. Educational Studies 36 (3):259-268.score: 180.0
    This contribution aims to examine how different areas of self?regulation are related to academic achievement in adolescents and young adults. The study involved participants, drawn from following age groups: 14?15, 17?18 and 22?23. In order to get information about cognitive, metacognitive, motivational and emotional aspects of self?regulation, self?report questionnaires were used. Differences between age?groups revealed following tendency: there has been a decrease in all fields of self?regulation from age of 14 (end of primary (...)
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  40. Monte Buchsbaum (1976). Self-Regulation of Stimulus Intensity: Augmenting/Reducing and the Average Evoked Response. In Gary E. Schwartz & D. H. Shapiro (eds.), Consciousness and Self-Regulation. Plenum. 101--135.score: 180.0
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  41. Mary K. Rothbart, Brad E. Sheese, M. Rosario Rueda & Michael I. Posner (2011). Developing Mechanisms of Self-Regulation in Early Life. Emotion Review 3 (2):207-213.score: 180.0
    Children show increasing control of emotions and behavior during their early years. Our studies suggest a shift in control from the brain’s orienting network in infancy to the executive network by the age of 3—4 years. Our longitudinal study indicates that orienting influences both positive and negative affect, as measured by parent report in infancy. At 3—4 years of age, the dominant control of affect rests in a frontal brain network that involves the anterior cingulate gyrus. Connectivity of brain structures (...)
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  42. Maren Westphal & George A. Bonanno (2004). Emotion Self-Regulation. In Mario Beauregard (ed.), Consciousness, Emotional Self-Regulation and the Brain. John Benjamins. 1--33.score: 180.0
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  43. Asolo Adeyeye Adewole (unknown). Corporate Social Responsibility, Self-Regulation, and the Problems of Unethical Business Practices in Africa: A Case for the Establishment of a United Nations Global Business Regulatory Agency. Philosophical Explorations:69-79.score: 180.0
    The paper examines the issue of corporate social responsibility (CSR) against the backdrop of its self-regulatory posture. Using the African experience as a case study, the paper observes that the activities of multinationals show very clearly that they are grossly irresponsible despite their professed self-regulation. Instead, the multinationals have created an image of terror due to their deep-rooted involvements in human rights abuses, environmental degradation, tax evasion, bribery, market manipulation, and other forms of unethical practices, notwithstanding their (...)
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  44. Sarah E. Ainsworth & Roy F. Baumeister (2013). Cooperation and Fairness Depend on Self-Regulation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):79-80.score: 180.0
    Any evolved disposition for fairness and cooperation would not replace but merely compete with selfish and other antisocial impulses. Therefore, we propose that human cooperation and fairness depend on self-regulation. Evidence shows reductions in fairness and other prosocial tendencies when self-regulation fails.
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  45. D. Meichenbaum (1976). Toward a Psychocognitive Theory of Self-Regulation. In Gary E. Schwartz & D. H. Shapiro (eds.), Consciousness and Self-Regulation. Plenum. 1--121.score: 180.0
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  46. J. Schwartz, Henry P. Stapp & Mario Beauregard (2004). The Volitional Influence of the Mind on the Brain, with Special Reference to Emotional Self-Regulation. Consciousness, Emotional Self-Regulation and the Brain. In Mario Beauregard (ed.), Consciousness, Emotional Self-Regulation and the Brain. John Benjamins.score: 180.0
  47. S. Prakash Sethi (ed.) (2011). Globalization and Self-Regulation: The Crucial Role That Corporate Codes of Conduct Play in Global Business. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 176.0
    It is imperative for the business community to act now to create global, industry-wide standards of conduct. Corporate strategy expert S. Prakash Sethi along with notable experts on issues of global codes of conduct take an in-depth look at global structures and how regulation works from a corporate perspective, providing case studies of several industries and governments who have begun implementing voluntary codes of conducts, including Equator Principles, ICMM, and The Kimberly Process._ He assesses the many types of (...)-regulations that are currently underway and provides critical analysis for making these more effective, making this a must-read for academics, policy-makers, and corporate leaders. (shrink)
     
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  48. Verner C. Petersen (2008). One Must Know It! A Personal Argument for Self-Regulation and Responsible Entrepreneurship. Philosophy of Management 6 (3):159-172.score: 174.0
    ‘Isn’t it clear that a man must have the right to warn the majority, to argue with the majority, to fight with the majority if he believes he holds the truth? Before many can know something, one must know it!’ The words are Dr Stockman’s of An Enemy of the People1 and in a competitive market building upon a Smithian self-interest there might seem to be no room for people like him. Whatever the personal attitudes of the owners, managers (...)
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  49. J. T. Stevenson (1985). Regulation, Deregulation, Self-Regulation: The Case of Engineers in Ontario. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 4 (4):253 - 267.score: 164.0
    Against a wider background of rationales for deregulation within a modern economy, and as an exercise of subjecting a theory to the hard discipline of a particular case, a detailed analysis is given of a recent proposal for a form of deregulation (the industrial exemption) for engineering in Ontario. The proposal of the Staff Study of the Professional Organizations Committee set up by the Ontario Government is analyzed in terms of its Posnerian foundations, and is critized theoretically, empirically and (...)
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  50. Richard S. Lazarus (1974). The Self-Regulation of Emotion. Philosophical Studies 22:168-179.score: 162.0
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