Search results for 'Self-Identification' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Cristina Becchio Tiziano Furlanetto, Cesare Bertone (2013). The Bilocated Mind: New Perspectives on Self-Localization and Self-Identification. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 180.0
    Does the human mind allow for self-locating at more than one place at a time? Evidence from neurology, cognitive neuroscience, and experimental psychology suggests that mental bilocation is a complex, but genuine experience, occurring more frequently than commonly thought. In this article, we distinguish between different components of bilocated self-representation: self-localization in two different places at the same time, self-identification with another body, reduplication of first-person perspective. We argue that different forms of mental bilocation may result from the combination (...)
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  2. Marc Jeannerod & Elisabeth Pacherie (2004). Agency, Simulation and Self-Identification. Mind and Language 19 (2):113-146.score: 144.0
    This paper is concerned with the problem of selfidentification in the domain of action. We claim that this problem can arise not just for the self as object, but also for the self as subject in the ascription of agency. We discuss and evaluate some proposals concerning the mechanisms involved in selfidentification and in agencyascription, and their possible impairments in pathological cases. We argue in favor of a simulation hypothesis that claims that actions, whether overt or covert, are centrally simulated (...)
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  3. Olga Afanasyeva (2008). Spiritual Culture and National Self-Identification as Major Factors in Overcoming Crisis in Russia. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 36:233-241.score: 120.0
    Liberal-Democratic changes in the Russian Society have brought a number of acute problems threatening national security and leading to converting Russia into a peripheral socio-cultural system («national self-identification crisis»). Scientific research shows that the main indicator of the said crisis is not only the critical economic differentiation of people into the «poor» and «rich» Russia (with the different ways of life, needs, mentality) but also spiritual degradation, spread of aggressive – depressive syndrome (growth of hatred, feeling of injustice, loss (...)
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  4. Rafael Currás-Pérez, Enrique Bigné-Alcañiz & Alejandro Alvarado-Herrera (2009). The Role of Self-Definitional Principles in Consumer Identification with a Socially Responsible Company. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):547 - 564.score: 108.0
    This research analyses the influence of the perception of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR image) on consumer–company identification (C–C identification). This analysis involves an examination of the influence of CSR image on brand identity characteristics which provide consumers with an instrument to satisfy their self-definitional needs, thereby perceiving the brand as more attractive. Also, the direct and mediated influences (through their effect on brand attitude), of CSR-based C–C identification on purchase intention are analysed. The results offer empirical evidence that CSR generates (...)
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  5. Lucy F. O'Brien (1995). The Problem of Self-Identification. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 95:235-251.score: 102.0
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  6. Gareth Evans (1994). Self-Identification. In Quassim Cassam (ed.), Self-Knowledge. Oup Oxford.score: 96.0
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  7. J. Decety & T. Chaminade (2003). When the Self Represents the Other: A New Cognitive Neuroscience View on Psychological Identification. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):577-596.score: 90.0
    There is converging evidence from developmental and cognitive psychology, as well as from neuroscience, to suggest that the self is both special and social, and that self-other interaction is the driving force behind self-development. We review experimental findings which demonstrate that human infants are motivated for social interactions and suggest that the development of an awareness of other minds is rooted in the implicit notion that others are like the self. We then marshal evidence from functional neuroimaging explorations of the (...)
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  8. Jenny Slatman (2009). A Strange Hand: On Self-Recognition and Recognition of Another. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):321-342.score: 90.0
    This article provides a phenomenological analysis of the difference between self-recognition and recognition of another, while referring to some contemporary neuroscientific studies on the rubber hand illusion. It examines the difference between these two forms of recognition on the basis of Husserl’s and Merleau-Ponty’s work. It argues that both phenomenologies, despite their different views on inter-subjectivity, allow for the specificity of recognition of another. In explaining self-recognition, however, Husserl’s account seems less convincing. Research concerning the rubber hand illusion has confirmed (...)
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  9. Lucy F. O'Brien (1995). Evans on Self-Identification. Noûs 29 (2):232-247.score: 90.0
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  10. Ingar Brinck (1998). Self-Identification and Self-Reference. Electronic Journal of Analytic Philosophy 6.score: 90.0
    [1] To know who one is, and also know whether one's experiences really belong to oneself, do not normally present any problem. It nevertheless happens that people do not recognise themselves as they walk by a mirror or do not understand that they fit some particular description. But there are situations in which it really seems impossible to be wrong about oneself. Of that, Ludwig Wittgenstein once wrote:
    It is possible that, say in an accident, I should feel pain (...)
    In the passage in which this remark is found, Wittgenstein distinguishes between two kinds of use of "I". The first use, as object, as in "I have broken my arm" or "The wind is blowing in my hair", he holds, involves the recognition of a particular person, and there is the possibility of error as concerns the identity of the person. In the other use, as subject, as in "I think it will rain" or "I am trying to lift my arm", no person is recognised. No mistake can be made about who the subject is. (shrink)
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  11. Thomas M. Franck (1997). Tribe, Nation, World: Self-Identification in the Evolving International System. Ethics and International Affairs 11 (1):151–169.score: 90.0
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  12. Manos Tsakiris Ana Tajadura-Jiménez, Matthew R. Longo, Rosie Coleman (2012). The Person in the Mirror: Using the Enfacement Illusion to Investigate the Experiential Structure of Self-Identification. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (4):1725.score: 90.0
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  13. Michael Woods (1968). Reference and Self-Identification. Journal of Philosophy 65 (19):568-578.score: 90.0
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  14. Mischa de Rover Daan Scheepers, Belle Derks, Sander Nieuwenhuis, Gert-Jan Lelieveld, Félice Van Nunspeet, Serge A. R. B. Rombouts (2013). The Neural Correlates of in-Group and Self-Face Perception: Is There Overlap for High Identifiers? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 90.0
    Social identity, the part of the self-concept derived from group membership, is a key explanatory construct for a wide variety of behaviors, ranging from organizational commitment to discrimination towards out-groups. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined the neural basis of social identity through a comparison with the neural correlates of self-face perception. Participants viewed a series of pictures, one at a time, of themselves, a familiar other, in-group members, and out-group members. We created a contrast for self-face perception by (...)
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  15. C. Canullo (2000). The Body and the Self-Identification of Conscious Life: The Science of Man Between Physiology and Psychology in Maine de Biran. Analecta Husserliana 66:203-224.score: 90.0
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  16. Dennis Duling (2008). " Whatever Gain I Had...": Ethnicity and Paul's Self-Identification in Philippians 3: 5-6. Hts Theological Studies 64 (2):799-818.score: 90.0
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  17. Arvydas Virgilijus Matulionis & A. Savicka (2007). Self-Identification: Sociological Research Data. Lithuanian Identity and Values, Lithuanian Philosophical Studies V, Cultural Heritage and Contemporary Change Series Iva, Eastern and Central Europe 31:83 - 99.score: 90.0
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  18. John H. Morgan (1982). Genetic Self-Identification and the Future. Philosophy Today 26 (4):301-311.score: 90.0
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  19. Ana Tajadura-Jiménez, Matthew R. Longo, Rosie Coleman & Manos Tsakiris (2012). The Person in the Mirror: Using the Enfacement Illusion to Investigate the Experiential Structure of Self-Identification. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (4):1725-1738.score: 90.0
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  20. Andy Hamilton (2009). Memory and Self-Consciousness: Immunity to Error Through Misidentification. [REVIEW] Synthese 171 (3):409 - 417.score: 84.0
    In The Blue Book, Wittgenstein defined a category of uses of “I” which he termed “I”-as-subject, contrasting them with “I”-as-object uses. The hallmark of this category is immunity to error through misidentification (IEM). This article extends Wittgenstein’s characterisation to the case of memory-judgments, discusses the significance of IEM for self-consciousness—developing the idea that having a first-person thought involves thinking about oneself in a distinctive way in which one cannot think of anyone or anything else—and refutes a common objection to the (...)
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  21. John L. Schwenkler (2008). Mental Vs. Embodied Models of Mirrored Self-Recognition: Some Preliminary Considerations. In B. Hardy-Valeé & N. Payette (eds.), Beyond the Brain: Embodied, Situated, and Distributed Cognition. Cambridge Scholars Press.score: 84.0
    A considerable body of recent work in developmental psychology and animal behavior has addressed the cognitive processes required to recognize oneself in a mirror. Most models of such "mirrored self-recognition" (MSR) treat it as the result of inferential processes drawing on the subject’s possession of some sort of mature "self-awareness". The present chapter argues that such an approach to MSR is not obligatory, and suggests some empirical grounds for rejecting it. We also sketch the outlines of an alternative, "embodied" theory (...)
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  22. Andrea Christofidou (1995). First Person: The Demand for Identification-Free Self-Reference. Journal of Philosophy 92 (4):223-234.score: 84.0
  23. David Rosenthal (2011). Awareness and Identification of Self. In JeeLoo Liu & John Perry (eds.), Consciousness and the Self: New Essays.score: 78.0
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  24. Halvor Hoveid & Marit Honerød Hoveid (2008). Teachers' Identity, Self and the Process of Learning. Studies in Philosophy and Education 27 (2-3):125-136.score: 78.0
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  25. Mirko Blagojevic (2012). Religious and Confessional Identification and Faith in God Among the Citizens of Serbia. Filozofija I Drustvo 23 (1):40-52.score: 78.0
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  26. Bennett W. Helm (2010). Love, Friendship, and the Self: Intimacy, Identification, and the Social Nature of Persons. Oxford University Press.score: 72.0
    Bennett Helm re-examines our common understanding of ourselves as persons in light of the phenomena of love and friendship.
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  27. Daniel Kolak (2008). Room for a View: On the Metaphysical Subject of Personal Identity. Synthese 162 (3):341 - 372.score: 72.0
    Sydney Shoemaker leads today’s “neo-Lockean” liberation of persons from the conservative animalist charge of “neo-Aristotelians” such as Eric Olson, according to whom persons are biological entities and who challenge all neo-Lockean views on grounds that abstracting from strictly physical, or bodily, criteria plays fast and loose with our identities. There is a fundamental mistake on both sides: a false dichotomy between bodily continuity versus psychological continuity theories of personal identity. Neo-Lockeans, like everyone else today who relies on Locke’s analysis of (...)
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  28. Dorothée Legrand (2006). The Bodily Self: The Sensori-Motor Roots of Pre-Reflective Self-Consciousness. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):89-118.score: 72.0
    A bodily self is characterized by pre-reflective bodily self-consciousness that is.
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  29. Thomas Metzinger (2013). The Myth of Cognitive Agency. Frontiers in Psychology 4 (931).score: 72.0
    This metatheoretical paper investigates mind wandering from the perspective of philosophy of mind. It has two central claims. The first is that on a conceptual level, mind wandering can be fruitfully described as a specific form of mental autonomy loss. The second is that most of what we call “conscious thought” is better analysed as a subpersonal process that more often than not lacks crucial properties traditionally taken to be the hallmark of personal-level cognition, such as mental agency, explicit, consciously (...)
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  30. Bernard Berofsky (2003). Identification, the Self, and Autonomy. Social Philosophy and Policy 20 (2):199-220.score: 72.0
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  31. Nafsika Athanassoulis (2011). Love, Friendship and the Self: Intimacy, Identification and the Social Nature – Bennett W. Helm. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (244):662-664.score: 72.0
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  32. Kyla Ebels-Duggan (2011). Helm , Bennett . Love, Friendship, and the Self: Intimacy, Identification, and the Social Nature of Persons . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. Pp. 316. $75.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 121 (4):808-812.score: 72.0
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  33. Erica Lucast Stonestreet (2010). Review of Bennett W. Helm, Love, Friendship, & the Self: Intimacy, Identification, & the Social Nature of Persons. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (6).score: 72.0
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  34. Thomas K. Metzinger (2013). The Myth of Cognitive Agency Subpersonal Thinking as a Cyclically Recurring Loss of Mental Autonomy. Frontiers in Psychology 4:931.score: 72.0
    This metatheoretical paper investigates mind wandering from the perspective of philosophy of mind. It has two central claims. The first is that on a conceptual level, mind wandering can be fruitfully described as a specific form of mental autonomy loss. The second is that most of what we call “conscious thought” is better analysed as a subpersonal process that more often than not lacks crucial properties traditionally taken to be the hallmark of personal-level cognition, such as mental agency, explicit, consciously (...)
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  35. Bat-Ami Bar On (1993). Reading Bartky: Identity, Identification, and Critical Self Reflection. Hypatia 8 (1):159 - 163.score: 72.0
    Remarks on Sandra Lee Bartky's Femininity and Domination.
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  36. Sarit Smila (2010). Love, Friendship, & the Self: Intimacy, Identification, & the Social Nature of Persons Bennett W. Helm Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009, Xvi + 316 Pp., $64.40 (Hardcover). [REVIEW] Dialogue 49 (4):652-653.score: 72.0
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  37. Andrew Travers (1995). The Identification of Self. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 25 (3):303–340.score: 72.0
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  38. Anabella Zagura (2011). Bennett W. Helm, Love, Friendship, & the Self: Intimacy, Identification, & the Social Nature of Persons, (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2010), 336 Pages. ISBN: 9780199567898 (Hbk.). Hardback: £40. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (4):646-648.score: 72.0
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  39. Ghozlane Fleury‐Bahi & Aurore Marcouyeux (2010). Place Evaluation and Self‐Esteem at School: The Mediated Effect of Place Identification. Educational Studies 36 (1):85-93.score: 72.0
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  40. Roger Griffin (1994). Integration and Identification: Conflicting Aspects of the Human Need for Self-Transcendence Within Ideological Communities. History of European Ideas 18 (1):11-23.score: 72.0
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  41. Shannon Winnubst (2010). The Danger of Identification: A Review of Self-Transformations: Foucault, Ethics, and Normalized Bodies by Cressida J. Heyes. [REVIEW] Hypatia 25 (1):224 - 228.score: 72.0
  42. Denis Robinson (2007). Human Beings, Human Animals, and Mentalistic Survival. In Dean W. Zimmerman (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics, Volume 3. Oxford University Press. 3-32.score: 66.0
    I critically discuss both the particular doctrinal and general meta-philosophical or methodological tenets of Mark Johnston's paper "Human Beings", attending to several weaknesses in his argument. One of the most important amongst them is an apparent reliance on a substitution of identicals within an intensional context as he argues that continuity of functioning brain is essential to the persistence of "Human Beings" as allegedly singled out by his methodology; another equally important is a simple lacuna in place of an argument (...)
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  43. Roderick M. Chisholm (1965). Notes on the Awareness of the Self. The Monist 49 (January):28-35.score: 66.0
  44. Geoffrey Rees (2010). The Ethical Imperative of Medical Humanities. Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (4):267-277.score: 66.0
    Medical humanities purchases its presence on the medical side of university campuses by adopting as its own the ends of medicine and medical ethics. It even justifies its presence by asserting promotion of those ends as an ethical imperative, most of all to improve the caring in medical care. As unobjectionable, even praiseworthy, as this imperative appears, it actually constrains the possibilities for interpersonal relationship in the context of medical practice. Development of those possibilities requires openness of self to the (...)
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  45. Glenn Carruthers (forthcoming). Who Am I in Out of Body Experiences? Implications From OBEs for the Explanandum of a Theory of Self-Consciousness. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-15.score: 60.0
    Contemporary theories of self-consciousness typically begin by dividing experiences of the self into types, each requiring separate explanation. The stereotypical case of an out of body experience (OBE) may be seen to suggest a distinction between the sense of oneself as an experiencing subject, a mental entity, and a sense of oneself as an embodied person, a bodily entity. Point of view, in the sense of the place from which the subject seems to experience the world, in this case is (...)
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  46. Lucy O'Brien (2007). Self-Knowing Agents. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    * Fascinating topic in the philosophy of mind and action * Changes the focus of, and gives fresh momentum to, current discussions of self-identification and self-reference * Rigorous discussion of rival views Lucy OBrien argues that a satisfactory account of first-person reference and self-knowledge needs to concentrate on our nature as agents. She considers two main questions. First, what account of first-person reference can we give that respects the guaranteed nature of such reference? Second, what account can we give (...)
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  47. Isabella Pasqualini, Joan Llobera & Olaf Blanke (2013). “Seeing” and “Feeling” Architecture: How Bodily Self-Consciousness Alters Architectonic Experience and Affects the Perception of Interiors. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 60.0
    Over the centuries architectural theory evolved several notions of embodiment, proposing in the 19th and 20th century that architectonic experience is related to physiological responses of the observer. Recent advances in the cognitive neuroscience of embodiment (or bodily self-consciousness) enable empirical studies of architectonic embodiment. Here, we investigated how architecture modulates bodily self-consciousness by adapting a video-based virtual reality setup previously used to investigate visuo-tactile mechanisms of bodily self-consciousness. While standing in two different interiors, participants were filmed from behind and (...)
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  48. Joantine Berghuijs, Jos Pieper & Cok Bakker (2013). Conceptions of Spirituality Among the Dutch Population. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 35 (3):369-397.score: 60.0
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  49. Quassim Cassam (ed.) (1994). Self-Knowledge. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This volume brings together some of the most important and influential recent writings on knowledge of oneself and of one's own thoughts, sensations, and experiences. The essays give valuable insights into such fundamental philosophical issues as personal identity, the nature of consciousness, the relation between mind and body, and knowledge of other minds. Contributions include "Introduction" by Gilbert Ryle, "Knowing One's Own Mind" by Donald Davidson, "Individualism and Self-Knowledge" and "Introspection and the Self" by Sydney Shoemaker, "On the Observability of (...)
     
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  50. Christopher Peacocke (1998). Conscious Attitudes, Attention, and Self-Knowledge. In C. Wright, B. Smith & C. Macdonald (eds.), Knowing Our Own Minds. Oxford University Press. 83.score: 54.0
    What is involved in the consciousness of a conscious, "occurrent" propositional attitude, such as a thought, a sudden conjecture or a conscious decision? And what is the relation of such consciousness to attention? I hope the intrinsic interest of these questions provides sufficient motivation to allow me to start by addressing them. We will not have a full understanding either of consciousness in general, nor of attention in general, until we have answers to these questions. I think there are constitutive (...)
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