Search results for 'Self-acceptance' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  4
    David E. Cournoyer, Renuka Sethi & Antonia Cordero (2005). Perceptions of Parental Acceptance‐Rejection and Self‐Concepts Among Ukrainian University Students. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 33 (3):335-346.
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  2.  11
    Daniel Statman (1993). Self‐Assessment, Self‐Esteem and Self‐Acceptance. Journal of Moral Education 22 (1):55-62.
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  3.  4
    Harry A. Grace (1953). The Self and Self - Acceptance. Educational Theory 3 (3):220-271.
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  4.  11
    Keith Frankish (2011). Conscious Thinking, Acceptance, and Self-Deception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (1):20-21.
    This commentary describes another variety of self-deception, highly relevant to von Hippel & Trivers's (VH&T's) project. Drawing on dual-process theories, I propose that conscious thinking is a voluntary activity motivated by metacognitive attitudes, and that our choice of reasoning strategies and premises may be biased by unconscious desires to self-deceive. Such biased reasoning could facilitate interpersonal deception, in line with VH&T's view.
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  5.  11
    Samuel C. Wheeler (1997). Self-Defense: Rights and Coerced Risk-Acceptance. Public Affairs Quarterly 11 (4):431-443.
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  6.  14
    G. J. Mattey (2003). Self-Trust and the Reasonableness of Acceptance. In Olsson Erik (ed.), The Epistemology of Keith Lehrer. Kluwer 173--194.
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  7.  17
    Kenneth K. Tanaka (2005). Acceptance of the Other as a Similarly Valid Path and Awareness of One's Self-Culpability: A Deepening Realization of My Religious Identity Through Dialogue. Buddhist-Christian Studies 25 (1):41-46.
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  8.  3
    Mark W. Baldwin, Jodene R. Baccus & Marina Milyavskaya (2010). Computer Game Associating Self-Concept to Images of Acceptance Can Reduce Adolescents' Aggressiveness in Response to Social Rejection. Cognition and Emotion 24 (5):855-862.
  9. David E. Cournoyer, Renuka Sethi & Antonia Cordero (2005). Perceptions of Parental Acceptance-Rejection and Self-Concepts Among Ukrainian University Students. Ethos 33 (3):335-346.
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  10.  57
    Frederick Neuhouser (2008). Rousseau's Theodicy of Self-Love: Evil, Rationality, and the Drive for Recognition. Oxford University Press.
    This book is the first comprehensive study of Rousseau's rich and complex theory of the type of self-love (amour proper) that, for him, marks the central difference between humans and the beasts. Amour proper is the passion that drives human individuals to seek the esteem, approval, admiration, or love--the recognition--of their fellow beings. Neuhouser reconstructs Rousseau's understanding of what the drive for recognition is, why it is so problematic, and how its presence opens up far-reaching developmental possibilities for creatures that (...)
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  11. Richmond Campbell (1979). Self-Love and Self-Respect: A Philosophical Study of Egoism. Published for the Canadian Association for Publishing in Philosophy by the Department of Philosophy of Carleton University.
     
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  12. Paul E. Staes (1972). Positive Self-Regard and Authentic Morality. [Manila]Loyola School of Theology.
     
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  13. L. Jonathan Cohen (1992). An Essay on Belief and Acceptance. New York: Clarendon Press.
    In this incisive new book one of Britain's most eminent philosophers explores the often overlooked tension between voluntariness and involuntariness in human cognition. He seeks to counter the widespread tendency for analytic epistemology to be dominated by the concept of belief. Is scientific knowledge properly conceived as being embodied, at its best, in a passive feeling of belief or in an active policy of acceptance? Should a jury's verdict declare what its members involuntarily believe or what they voluntarily accept? And (...)
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  14.  29
    Rolfe King (2013). Divine Self-Testimony and the Knowledge of God. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (3):279-295.
    A proof is offered that aims to show that there can be no knowledge of God, excluding knowledge based on natural theology, without divine self-testimony. Both special and general revelation, if they occur, would be forms of divine self-testimony. It is argued that this indicates that the best way to model such knowledge of God is on the basis of an analogy with knowledge gained through testimony, rather than perceptual models of knowledge, such as the prominent model defended by Plantinga. (...)
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  15.  5
    Jennifer C. Sarrett (2016). Biocertification and Neurodiversity: The Role and Implications of Self-Diagnosis in Autistic Communities. Neuroethics 9 (1):23-36.
    Neurodiversity, the advocacy position that autism and related conditions are natural variants of human neurological outcomes that should be neither cured nor normalized, is based on the assertion that autistic people have unique neurological differences. Membership in this community as an autistic person largely results from clinical identification, or biocertification. However, there are many autistic individuals who diagnose themselves. This practice is contentious among autistic communities. Using data gathered from Wrong Planet, an online autism community forum, this article describes the (...)
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  16.  29
    Massimo Renzo (2014). Fairness, Self-Deception and Political Obligation. Philosophical Studies 169 (3):467-488.
    I offer a new account of fair-play obligations for non-excludable benefits received from the state. Firstly, I argue that non-acceptance of these benefits frees recipients of fairness obligations only when a counterfactual condition is met; i.e. when non-acceptance would hold up in the closest possible world in which recipients do not hold motivationally-biased beliefs triggered by a desire to free-ride. Secondly, I argue that because of common mechanisms of self-deception there will be recipients who reject these benefits without meeting the (...)
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  17.  30
    Kristin Borgwald (2012). Women's Anger, Epistemic Personhood, and Self-Respect: An Application of Lehrer's Work on Self-Trust. Philosophical Studies 161 (1):69-76.
    I argue in this paper that the work of Keith Lehrer, especially in his book Self-Trust has applications to feminist ethics; specifically care ethics, which has become the leading form of normative sentimentalist ethics. I extend Lehrer's ideas concerning reason and justification of belief beyond what he says by applying the notion of evaluation central to his account of acceptance to the need for evaluation of emotions. The inability to evaluate and attain justification of one's emotions is an epistemic failure (...)
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  18.  3
    Merlin B. Thompson (2015). Authenticity in Education: From Narcissism and Freedom to the Messy Interplay of Self-Exploration and Acceptable Tension. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (6):603-618.
    The problem with authenticity—the idea of being “true to one’s self”—is that its somewhat checkered reputation garners a complete range of favorable and unfavorable reactions. In educational settings, authenticity is lauded as one of the top two traits students desire in their teachers. Yet, authenticity is criticized for its tendency towards narcissism and self-entitlement. So, is authenticity a good or a bad thing? The purpose of this article is to develop an intimate understanding of authenticity by investigating its current interpretation (...)
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  19.  7
    Anita Kim (2014). The Curious Case of Self‐Interest: Inconsistent Effects and Ambivalence Toward a Widely Accepted Construct. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (1):99-122.
    Self-interest is widely accepted as a powerful motivator by both academics and laypeople alike. However, research surrounding the self-interest motive paints a complicated picture of this most important psychological construct. Additionally, research on the social desirability of self-interest has revealed that despite its widespread acceptance, people do not readily accept that self-interest drives their own behaviors. This paper reviews the literature on self-interest and reveals several curious features surrounding its actual effect on helping behaviors, political attitudes and voting, and people's (...)
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  20.  4
    Hajime Sato, Akira Akabayashi & Ichiro Kai (2006). Public, Experts, and Acceptance of Advanced Medical Technologies: The Case of Organ Transplant and Gene Therapy in Japan. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 14 (4):203-214.
    In 1997, after long social debates, the Japanese government enacted a law on organ transplantation from brain-dead bodies. Since 1993, on gene therapy, administrative agencies have issued a series of guidelines. This study seeks to elucidate when people became aware of the issues and when they formed their opinions on organ transplant and gene therapy. At the same time, it aims to examine at which point in time experts, those in university ethical committees and in academic societies, consider these technologies (...)
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  21.  3
    Nelson Oly Ndubisi (2007). Customers' Perceptions and Intention to Adopt Internet Banking: The Moderation Effect of Computer Self-Efficacy. [REVIEW] AI and Society 21 (3):315-327.
    In the past, the conventional concentration of Internet banking (IB) research has been on technology development, but this is now shifting to user-focused research. It has been suggested that potential users of IB services in Malaysia may not adopt the system even if they are available, due to their perceptions of this application and their level of confidence in using it to solve their banking needs. This study therefore employs the extended technology acceptance model as the theoretical framework for assessing (...)
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  22. Jonathan A. Jacobs (1995). Practical Realism and Moral Psychology. Georgetown University Press.
  23. Joseph A. Magno (2000). Self-Love: The Heart of Healing. Upa.
    Self-Love is an original and insightful study of a much-maligned concept that may in fact hold the key to well being. Author Joseph Magno explores the positive aspects of self-love as well as the destructive consequences that can result when it is lacking. Building on the perspective that human beings are inherently loving by nature, Magno argues that self-love is causally and reciprocally linked to selflessly loving others. By contrast, fear, selfishness, suffering, and even the abuse of others may arise (...)
     
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  24. Keith Lehrer (2012). Art, Self, and Knowledge. Oxford University Press.
    Knowing the content of art -- Consciousness, exemplars, and art -- Aesthetic theory, feminist art ,and autonomy -- Value, expression, and globalization -- Artistic creation, freedom, and self -- Aesthetics, death, and beauty -- Aesthetic experience, intentionality, and the form of representation -- Theories of art, and art as theory of the world -- Self-trust, disagreement, and reasonable acceptance -- Social reason, aggregation, and collective wisdom -- Knowledge, autonomy, and art in loop theory.
     
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  25.  7
    Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman (2003). The Impact of Self-Esteem, Machiavellianism, and Social Capital on Attorneys' Traditional Gender Outlook. Journal of Business Ethics 43 (4):323 - 335.
    Utilizing a national sample of 106 attorneys and hierarchical regression analysis, this study identified several individual tendencies that could adversely affect women attorneys' career experiences. The findings indicated that self-esteem was negatively associated with a traditional gender outlook, and that Machiavellianism was positively associated with conservative beliefs about gender. Tolerance for diversity was negatively related to a traditional gender outlook, while work-based social agency was positively related to the preference for established gender roles. The results imply that confidence brings about (...)
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  26.  52
    Robin S. Dillon (2001). Self‐Forgiveness and Self‐Respect. Ethics 112 (1):53-83.
    ABSTRACT. Thirty years later, Alison still recalls an episode in her teens, not frequently, but often enough, and always with something akin to self-loathing. There was this girl, Dana, someone Alison had been friends with in middle school, though they'd drifted apart. Dana was nice and smart and funny, and she was deformed (maybe thalidomide, Alison now thinks). That hadn't mattered to Alison when they were younger, but it was a big deal to her high school friends. They made up (...)
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  27.  96
    Samuel Clark (2012). Pleasure as Self-Discovery. Ratio 25 (3):260-276.
    This paper uses readings of two classic autobiographies, Edmund Gosse's Father & Son and John Stuart Mill's Autobiography, to develop a distinctive answer to an old and central question in value theory: What role is played by pleasure in the most successful human life? A first section defends my method. The main body of the paper then defines and rejects voluntarist, stoic, and developmental hedonist lessons to be taken from central crises in my two subjects' autobiographies, and argues for a (...)
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  28.  56
    Trudy Govier (1993). Self-Trust, Autonomy, and Self-Esteem. Hypatia 8 (1):99 - 120.
    Self-trust is a necessary condition of personal autonomy and self-respect. Self-trust involves a positive sense of the motivations and competence of the trusted person; a willingness to depend on him or her; and an acceptance of vulnerability. It does not preclude trust in others. A person may be rightly said to have too much self-trust; however core self-trust is essential for functioning as an autonomous human being.
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  29.  81
    Josep E. Corbí (2010). First-Person Authority and Self-Knowledge as an Achievement. European Journal of Philosophy 18 (3):325-362.
    Abstract: There is much that I admire in Richard Moran's account of how first-person authority may be consistent with self-knowledge as an achievement. In this paper, I examine his attempt to characterize the goal of psychoanalytic treatment, which is surely that the patient should go beyond the mere theoretical acceptance of the analyst's interpretation, and requires instead a more intimate, first-personal, awareness by the patient of their psychological condition.I object, however, that the way in which Moran distinguishes between the deliberative (...)
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  30. Daniel Wegner, The Mind's Self-Portrait.
    Scientific psychology and neuroscience are taking increasingly precise and comprehensive pictures of the human mind, both in its physi- cal architecture and its functional processes. Meanwhile, each human mind has an abbreviated view of itself, a self-portrait that captures how it thinks it operates, and that therefore has been remarkably influential. The mind’s self-portrait has as a central feature the idea that thoughts cause actions, and that the self is thus an origin of the body’s actions. This self- portrait is (...)
     
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  31. Keith Lehrer (1997). Self-Trust: A Study of Reason, Knowledge, and Autonomy. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Keith Lehrer offers an original philosophical view of principal aspects of the human condition, such as reason, knowledge, wisdom, autonomy, love, consensus, and consciousness. Three unifying ideas run through the book. The first is that what is uniquely human is the capacity for metamental ascent, the ability to consider and evaluate first-order mental states that arise naturally within us. A primary function of this metamental ascent is the resolution of personal and interpersonal conflict, essential to such central human goods as (...)
     
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  32.  31
    Fuchuan Yao (2008). The Compatibility Between Bodhisattva Compassion and 'No-Self'. Asian Philosophy 18 (3):267 – 278.
    _Since arguably Bodhisattva Practice (bodhisattva-carya) is the foundation of Mahayana Buddhist ethics, it is significantly important for Bodhisattva compassion to be compatible with other Buddhist doctrines, specifically with the doctrine of 'no-self ' (anatta). There are two thoughts on the relation between compassion and 'no-self ': they are compatible or incompatibility. Most Buddhist authors accept the former view. However, the principal problem with the two views is that their arguments have not been singled out. So the acceptance or denial of (...)
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  33.  29
    David Alm (2008). Deontological Restrictions and the Self/Other Asymmetry. Noûs 42 (4):642-672.
    This paper offers a partial justification of so-called "deontological restrictions." Specifically it defends the "self/other asymmetry," that we are morally obligated to treat our own agency, and thus its results, as specially important. The argument rests on a picture of moral obligation of a broadly Kantian sort. In particular, it rests on the basic normative assumption that our fundamental obligations are determined by the principles which a rational being as such would follow. These include principles which it is not essential (...)
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  34.  40
    Tomis Kapitan (2006). Self-Determination and International Order. The Monist 89 (2):356 - 370.
    Towards the end of the first world war, a “principle of self-determination” was proposed as a foundation for international order. In the words of its chief advocate, U.S. President Woodrow Wilson, it specified that the “settlement of every question, whether of territory, of sovereignty, of economic arrangement, or of political relationship” is to be made “upon the basis of the free acceptance of that settlement by the people immediately concerned and not upon the basis of the material interest or advantage (...)
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  35.  9
    Alan Carter (1989). 'Self-Exploitation' and Workers' Co-Operatives—or How the British Left Get Their Concepts Wrong. Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (2):195-200.
    ABSTRACT In this article I examine the concept ‘self‐exploitation’ and its use in criticising workers' co‐operatives. I argue that the concept is incoherent and that the kind of exploitation which members of workers' co‐ops actually face is ‘market‐exploitation’. Moreover, some of the criticisms of workers' co‐ops which are made by those who employ the confused concept ‘self‐exploitation’ are shown to be inapposite when ‘market‐exploitation’ is recognised to be the real problem. I conclude with a discussion of the reasons for the (...)
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  36. Scarta (2012). Call for Papers: Territory, Belonging: Secession, Self-Determination and Territorial Rights in the Age of Identity Politics. Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
    Symposium: Territory, Belonging: secession, self-determination and territorial rights in the age of identity politics With a discussion of Neera Chandhoke’s Contested Secessions. Rights, Self-determination, Democracy and Kashmir (OUP 2012) Guest Editor: Valentina Gentile Submission Deadline Long(1,000 words max): November 15, 2012 Full paper (10,000 words max, upon acceptance): March 15, 2013 Invited Contributors Allen Buchanan (DukeUniversity), Will Kymlicka (Queen’s University), Margaret Moore (Queen’s University) and Neera Chandhoke (University of Delhi).
     
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  37.  12
    C. D. Meyers (2013). Hobbes and the Rationality of Self-Preservation: Grounding Morality on the Desires We Should Have. The European Legacy 18 (3):269-286.
    In deriving his moral code, Hobbes does not appeal to any mind-independent good, natural human telos, or innate human sympathies. Instead he assumes a subjectivist theory of value and an egoistic theory of human motivation. Some critics, however, doubt that his laws of nature can be constructed from such scant material. Hobbes ultimately justifies the acceptance of moral laws by the fact that they promote self-preservation. But, as Hobbes himself acknowledges, not everyone prefers survival over natural liberty. In this essay (...)
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  38.  6
    Howard Rachlin (1995). Self-Control Observed. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):148-159.
    Complex cases of self-control involve processes such as guilt-avoidance, inhibition, self-punishment, conscious thought, free will, and imagination. Such processes, conceived as internal mediating mechanisms, serve the function in psychological theory of avoiding teleological causation. Acceptance of the scientific legitimacy of teleological behaviorism would obviate the need for internal mediation, redefine the above processes in terms of temporally extended patterns of overt behavior, and clarify their relation to selfcontrol.
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  39.  16
    Jeff Mitchell (2000). Living a Lie: Self-Deception, Habit, and Social Roles. [REVIEW] Human Studies 23 (2):145-156.
    In this paper I give an account of self-deception by situating it within the theory of human conduct advanced by American pragmatists John Dewey and George Herbert Mead. After examining and rejecting the two most prevalent explanations of self-deception - namely, Sigmund Freud's psychoanalytic interpretation and Jean-Paul Sartre's phenomenological one - I provide a brief sketch of some of Dewey's and Mead's fundamental insights into the inherently social nature of mind.I argue that one of the main forms of self-deception involves (...)
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  40.  15
    Michael D. Barber (2006). Rorty's Ethical de-Divinization of the Moralist Self. Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 (1):135-147.
    This article examines Richard Rorty's approach to the self in Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity . In spite of their differing philosophical bases, Rorty and Emmanuel Levinas converge methodologically in their treatments of the self by avoiding paradigmatic notions of human nature and a philosophical project of justification. Although Rorty refuses to prioritize a moralist account of the self over its romanticist rivals, his presentation relies on the reader's response to the ethical appeal of the other as depicted by Levinas: Rorty (...)
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  41.  5
    W. L. Adeyemo, B. O. Mofikoya, O. A. Akadiri, O. James & A. A. Fashina (2013). Acceptance and Perception of Nigerian Patients to Medical Photography. Developing World Bioethics 13 (3):105-110.
    The aim of the study was to determine the acceptance and perception of Nigerian patients to medical photography. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed among Nigerian patients attending oral and maxillofacial surgery and plastic surgery clinics of 3 tertiary health institutions. Information requested included patients' opinion about consent process, capturing equipment, distribution and accessibility of medical photographs. The use of non-identifiable medical photographs was more acceptable than identifiable to respondents for all purposes (P = 0.003). Most respondents were favourably disposed to (...)
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  42.  14
    Paul Healy (2000). Self-Other Relations and the Rationality of Cultures. Philosophy and Social Criticism 26 (6):61-83.
    As attested by Taylor, Calhoun and others, recognition is central to (cultural) identity and to a related sense of self-worth. In contrast, by denying the comparable worth of other cultures, non-recognition represents a potentially damaging mode of intercultural relations. Although not widely acknowledged, a related consideration has been at issue in the rationality debate, initiated by Peter Winch, throughout its several phases. Briefly stated, the problem is that the polarized alternatives of ethnocentric universalism and self-sealing relativism that have characterized this (...)
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  43.  4
    R. Lofmark, T. Nilstun & I. A. Bolmsjo (2007). From Cure to Palliation: Concept, Decision and Acceptance. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (12):685-688.
    The aim of this paper is to present and discuss nurses’ and physicians’ comments in a questionnaire relating to patients’ transition from curative treatment to palliative care. The four-page questionnaire relating to experiences of and attitudes towards communication, decision-making, documentation and responsibility of nurses and physicians and towards the competence of patients was developed and sent to a random sample of 1672 nurses and physicians of 10 specialties. The response rate was 52% , and over one-third made comments. The respondents (...)
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  44.  4
    Richard Double (1988). What's Wrong with Self‐Serving Epistemic Strategies? Philosophical Psychology 1 (3):343-350.
    Abstract This paper contrasts two views on the ethics of belief, the absolutist position that adopting self?serving epistemic strategies is always morally wrong, and the holist position that non?epistemic factors may legitimately be consulted whenever we adopt epistemic strategies. In the first section, the absolutist view is shown to be untenable because of the holistic nature of moral questions in general. In the second section, the nagging appeal of the absolutist position is explored. An account of our ambivalence regarding the (...)
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  45. Robert Allen (2008). Free Agency and Self-Esteem. Sorites 20:74-79.
    In this paper I define the role of self-esteem in promoting free agency, in order to meet some objections to the content-neutrality espoused by the reflective acceptance approach to free agency, according to which an agent has acted freely if and only if she would reflectively accept the process by which her motive was formed -- in other words, any volition the agent forms is an impetus to a free action just in case she would positively appraise its genesis. For (...)
     
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  46. Gary F. Greif (2000). The Tragedy of the Self: Individual and Social Disintegration Viewed Through the Self Psychology of Heinz Kohut. Upa.
    In The Tragedy of the Self, Gary F. Greif attributes social violence and individual isolation to a contemporary neglect of a fundamental human need for support that only human culture and interaction can promote and reinforce. Greif bases this interpretation on the works of Heinz Kohut, a psychoanalyst who by degrees transformed Freud's theory of the instincts into a theory of the self. Kohut maintains that every individual fundamentally requires continual human support in order to live with confidence and hope. (...)
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  47. Simon Lumsden (2014). Self-Consciousness and the Critique of the Subject: Hegel, Heidegger, and the Poststructuralists. Cup.
    Poststructuralists hold Hegel responsible for giving rise to many of modern philosophy's problematic concepts--the authority of reason, self-consciousness, the knowing subject. Yet, according to Simon Lumsden, this animosity is rooted in a fundamental misunderstanding of Hegel's thought, and resolving this tension can not only heal the rift between poststructuralism and German idealism but also point these traditions in exciting new directions. Revisiting the philosopher's key texts, Lumsden calls attention to Hegel's reformulation of liberal and Cartesian conceptions of subjectivity, identifying a (...)
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  48. Ulrich Steinvorth (2012). Rethinking the Western Understanding of the Self. Cambridge University Press.
    Ulrich Steinvorth offers a fresh analysis and critique of rationality as a defining element in Western thinking. Steinvorth argues that Descartes' understanding of the self offers a more plausible and realistic alternative to the prevailing understanding of the self formed by the Lockean conception and utilitarianism. When freed from Cartesian dualism, such a conceptualization enables us to distinguish between self and subject. Moreover, it enables us to understand why individualism – one of the hallmarks of modernity in the West – (...)
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  49.  9
    Nicholas Rescher (1987). How Serious a Fallacy is Inconsistency? Argumentation 1 (3):303-316.
    Consistency is often pictured as an indispensable requisite for rationality. The paper argues that this is overly rigoristic. Inconsistency can be treated as a matter of isolable singularities rather than an all-destructive disaster. The paper, supports and illustrates a perspective on which consistency can be seen as a desideratum rather than a totaly non-negotiable demand. The argumentation of the paper casts consistency in the role of a cognitive ideal rather than a sine qua non condition of rational process.
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  50.  24
    Neven Sesardić (1992). Science and Politics: Dangerous Liaisons. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 23 (1):129-151.
    In contrast to the opinion of numerous authors (e.g. R. Rudner, P. Kitcher, L. R. Graham, M. Dummett, N. Chomsky, R. Lewontin, etc.) it is argued here that the formation of opinion in science should be greatly insulated from political considerations. Special attention is devoted to the view that methodological standards for evaluation of scientific theories ought to vary according to the envisaged political uses of these theories.
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