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Search results for 'Self-identity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Pi-Yueh Cheng & Mei-Chin Chu (2013). Behavioral Factors Affecting Students' Intentions to Enroll in Business Ethics Courses: A Comparison of the Theory of Planned Behavior and Social Cognitive Theory Using Self-Identity as a Moderator. Journal of Business Ethics:1-12.score: 180.0
    The current study used both Ajzen’s theory of planned behavior (TPB) and Bandura’s social cognitive theory (SCT) to examine the intentions of business undergraduate students toward taking elective ethics courses and investigated the role of self-identity in this process. The study was prospective in design; data on predictors and intentions were obtained during the first collection of data, whereas the actual behavior was assessed 10 days later. Our results indicated that the TPB was a better predictor of behavioral intentions (...)
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  2. Mardi J. Horowitz (2012). Self-Identity Theory and Research Methods. Journal of Research Practice 8 (2):Article - M14.score: 162.0
    Identity disturbances are common in clinical conditions and personality measures need to extend to assessment of coherence in underlying levels of self-coherence. The problem has been difficult to solve because self-organization is a complex unconscious set of mind/brain processes embedded in social roles and values. Theory helps us address this problem and suggests methods and limitations of interpretation that involve self-reports of subjects, observers who rate subjects, and narrative analyses of verbal communications from subjects.
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  3. Neil Joseph MacKinnon (2010). Self, Identity, and Social Institutions. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 162.0
    Introduction -- Cultural theories of people -- Identities in standard English -- Language and social institutions -- The cultural self -- The self's identities -- Theories of identities and selves -- Theories of norms and institutions -- Social reality and human subjectivity.
     
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  4. Sydney Shoemaker (1963). Self-Knowledge and Self-Identity. Cornell University Press.score: 150.0
  5. Derek Parfit (1971). On the Importance of Self-Identity. Journal of Philosophy 68 (October):683-90.score: 150.0
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  6. Terence W. Penelhum (1971). The Importance of Self-Identity. Journal of Philosophy 68 (October):667-78.score: 150.0
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  7. Kenneth R. Merrill (1970). Comments on Professor H.D. Lewis, Self-Identity and Memory. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 1 (1-2):230-236.score: 150.0
  8. Kewal K. Mittal (1979). Self-Identity and Self-Consciousness. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 7 (October):159-63.score: 150.0
     
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  9. James Giles (1993). The No-Self Theory: Hume, Buddhism, and Personal Identity. Philosophy East and West 43 (2):175-200.score: 144.0
    The problem of personal identity is often said to be one of accounting for what it is that gives persons their identity over time. However, once the problem has been construed in these terms, it is plain that too much has already been assumed. For what has been assumed is just that persons do have an identity. A new interpretation of Hume's no-self theory is put forward by arguing for an eliminative rather than a reductive view of personal identity, and (...)
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  10. Robert Schroer (2013). Reductionism in Personal Identity and the Phenomenological Sense of Being a Temporally Extended Self. American Philosophical Quarterly 50 (4):339-356.score: 144.0
    The special and unique attitudes that we take towards events in our futures/pasts—e.g., attitudes like the dread of an impeding pain—create a challenge for “Reductionist” accounts that reduce persons to aggregates of interconnected person stages: if the person stage currently dreading tomorrow’s pain is numerically distinct from the person stage that will actually suffer the pain, what reason could the current person stage have for thinking of that future pain as being his? One reason everyday subjects believe they have a (...)
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  11. Cam Caldwell (2009). Identity, Self-Awareness, and Self-Deception: Ethical Implications for Leaders and Organizations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (3):393 - 406.score: 144.0
    The ability of leaders to be perceived as trustworthy and to develop authentic and effective relationships is largely a function of their personal identities and their self-awareness in understanding and making accommodations for their weaknesses. The research about self-deception confirms that we often practice denial regarding our identities without being fully aware of the ethical duties that we owe to ourselves and to others. This article offers insights about the nature of identity and selfawareness, specifically examining how self-deception can create (...)
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  12. Soraj Hongladarom (2011). Personal Identity and the Self in the Online and Offline World. Minds and Machines 21 (4):533-548.score: 144.0
    The emergence of social networking sites has created a problem of how the self is to be understood in the online world. As these sites are social, they relate someone with others in a network. Thus there seems to emerge a new kind of self which exists in the online world. Accounting for the online self here also has implications on how the self in the outside world should be understood. It is argued that, as the use of online social (...)
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  13. Thomas Pradeu & Edgardo D. Carosella (2006). The Self Model and the Conception of Biological Identity in Immunology. Biology and Philosophy 21 (2):235-252.score: 144.0
    The self/non-self model, first proposed by F.M. Burnet, has dominated immunology for 60 years now. According to this model, any foreign element will trigger an immune reaction in an organism, whereas endogenous elements will not, in normal circumstances, induce an immune reaction. In this paper we show that the self/non-self model is no longer an appropriate explanation of experimental data in immunology, and that this inadequacy may be rooted in an excessively strong metaphysical conception of biological identity. We suggest that (...)
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  14. Claudia Welz (2010). Identity as Self-Transformation: Emotional Conflicts and Their Metamorphosis in Memory. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 43 (2):267-285.score: 144.0
    This paper develops the thesis that personal identity is neither to be taken in terms of an unchanging self-sufficient ‘substance’ nor in terms of selfhood ‘without substance,’ i.e. as fluctuating processes of pure relationality and subject-less activity. Instead, identity is taken as self-transformation that is bound to particular embodied individuals and surpasses them as individuated entities. The paper is structured in three parts. Part I describes the experiential givenness of conflicts that support our sense of self-transformation. While the first part (...)
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  15. Daniel Moseley (2012). Self-Creation, Identity and Authenticity: A Study of "A History of Violence" and "Eastern Promises&Quot;. In Simon Riches (ed.), The Philosophy of David Cronenberg. University Press of Kentucky.score: 144.0
    This essay explores philosophical questions about practical identity that emerge in David Cronenberg's films, "A History of Violence" and "Eastern Promises." I distinguish the metaphysical problems of personal identity from the practical problems and contend that the latter are of central importance to the topic of authenticity. Central scenes from both films are examined with an eye to their engagement with the issues of authenticity and self-creation.
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  16. Raymond Martin (2000). Naturalization of the Soul: Self and Personal Identity in the Eighteenth Century. Routledge.score: 144.0
    Naturalization of the Soul charts the development of the concepts of soul and self in Western thought, from Plato to the present. It fills an important gap in intellectual history by being the first book to emphasize the enormous intellectual transformation in the eighteenth century, when the religious 'soul' was replaced first by a philosophical 'self' and then by a scientific 'mind'. The authors show that many supposedly contemporary theories of the self were actually discussed in the eighteenth century, and (...)
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  17. Udo Thiel (2011). The Early Modern Subject: Self-Consciousness and Personal Identity From Descartes to Hume. Oxford University Press.score: 144.0
    The Early Modern Subject explores the understanding of self-consciousness and personal identity--two fundamental features of human subjectivity--as it developed in early modern philosophy. Udo Thiel presents a critical evaluation of these features as they were conceived in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. He explains the arguments of thinkers such as Descartes, Locke, Leibniz, Wolff, and Hume, as well as their early critics, followers, and other philosophical contemporaries, and situates them within their historical contexts. Interest in the issues of self-consciousness and (...)
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  18. Lynne Rudder Baker (forthcoming). Making Sense of Ourselves: Self-Narratives and Personal Identity. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-9.score: 144.0
    Some philosophers take personal identity to be a matter of self-narrative. I argue, to the contrary, that self-narrative views cannot stand alone as views of personal (or numerical) identity. First, I consider Dennett’s self-narrative view, according to which selves are fictional characters—abstractions, like centers of gravity—generated by brains. Neural activity is to be interpreted from the intentional stance as producing a story. I argue that this is implausible. The inadequacy is masked by Dennett’s ambiguous use of ‘us’: sometimes ‘us’ refers (...)
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  19. Scott John Vitell, Mark N. Bing, H. Kristl Davison, Anthony P. Ammeter, Bart L. Garner & Milorad M. Novicevic (2009). Religiosity and Moral Identity: The Mediating Role of Self-Control. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):601 - 613.score: 144.0
    The ethics literature has identified moral motivation as a factor in ethical decision-making. Furthermore, moral identity has been identified as a source of moral motivation. In the current study, we examine religiosity as an antecedent to moral identity and examine the mediating role of self-control in this relationship. We find that intrinsic and extrinsic dimensions of religiosity have different direct and indirect effects on the internalization and symbolization dimensions of moral identity. Specifically, intrinsic religiosity plays a role in counterbalancing the (...)
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  20. Alice Koubová (2013). Self-Identity and Powerlessness. Brill.score: 138.0
     
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  21. Marzenna Jakubczak (2011). The Collision of Language and Metaphysics in the Search of Self-Identity: On Ahaṃkāra and Asmitā in Sāṃkhya-Yoga. ARGUMENT 1 (1):37-48.score: 132.0
    The author of this paper discusses some major points vital for two classical Indian schools of philosophy: (1) a significant feature of linguistic analysis in the Yoga tradition; (2) the role of the religious practice (iśvara-pranidhana) in the search for true self-identity in Samkhya and Yoga darśanas with special reference to their gnoseological purposes; and (3) some possible readings of ‘ahamkara’ and ‘asmita’ displayed in the context of Samkhya-Yoga phenomenology and metaphysics. The collision of language and metaphysics refers to (...)
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  22. Brian Garrett (1998). Personal Identity and Self-Consciousness. Routledge.score: 126.0
    The first book synthesizing the many different topics that surround the issue of personal identity, this text makes an important contribution to the philosophy of personal identity and mind, and to epistemology.
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  23. Muna Golmohamad (2004). World Citizenship, Identity and the Notion of an Integrated Self. Studies in Philosophy and Education 23 (2/3):131-148.score: 126.0
    In light of the complex notions ofidentity, this paper attempts to consider howto perceive the notion of world citizenship.The paper looks to discussions on the self andidentity; focusing on the writing of CharlesTaylor and Alasdair MacIntyre, with particularattention given to the notion of an integratedself.
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  24. Hsin-wen Lee (2012). The Identity Argument for National Self-Determination. Public Affairs Quarterly 26 (2):123-139.score: 126.0
    http://paq.press.illinois.edu/26/2/lee.html A number of philosophers argue that the moral value of national identity is sufficient to justify at least a prima facie right of a national community to create its own independent, sovereign state. In the literature, this argument is commonly referred to as the identity argument. In this paper, I consider whether the identity argument successfully proves that a national group is entitled to a state of its own. To do so, I first explain three important steps in the (...)
     
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  25. Ferdinand Santos (2007). Personal Identity, the Self, and Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 126.0
    Going beyond the present controversy surrounding personhood in various non-philosophical contexts, this book seeks to defend the renewed philosophical interest in issues connected with this topic and the need for a more credible philosophical conception of the person. Taking the theory of John Locke as a starting point and in dialogue with contemporary philosophers such as Derek Parfit and P.F. Strawson, the authors develop an original philosophical anthropology based on the writings of Charles Hartshorne and A.N. Whitehead. The authors then (...)
     
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  26. David W. Shoemaker (2010). Self-Exposure and Exposure of the Self: Informational Privacy and the Presentation of Identity. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 12 (1):3-15.score: 120.0
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  27. Hector-Neri Castaneda (1989). The Reflexivity of Self-Consciousness: Sameness/Identity, Data for Artificial Intelligence. Philosophical Topics 17 (1):27-58.score: 120.0
  28. John Douglas Bishop (2000). Is Self-Identity Image Advertising Ethical? Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (2):371-398.score: 120.0
    Discussions of the ethics of advertising have been based on a general distinction between informative and persuasive advertising without looking at specific techniques of persuasion. Self-identity image ads persuade by presenting an image of an idealizedperson-type such as a “beautiful” woman (Chanel) or a sexy teen (Calvin Klein). The product becomes a symbol of the ideal, and targetconsumers are invited to use the product to project the self-image to themselves and others. This paper argues that image ads are notfalse (...)
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  29. R. Martin & John Barresi (2004). Naturalizing the Soul: Self and Personal Identity in the Eighteenth Century. Routledge.score: 120.0
    It fills an important gap in intellectual history by being the first book to emphasize the enormous intellectual transformation in the eighteenth century, when...
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  30. Rachael M. Henry (1987). Moral Belief Structure and Content, Self‐Identity and Parental Favouritism as Determinants of Moral Judgement Stage. Journal of Moral Education 16 (1):3-17.score: 120.0
    Abstract Moral judgement stage in 69 adult students was investigated in relation to the cognitive articulation and content of their moral belief systems, the content and structure of their self?identity systems, and perceived favouritism by their parents in child?rearing. Articulation of the moral belief system was not related to moral stage; however, belief content was related to stage, with both pre?conventional and post?conventional subjects tending to reject orthodox moral values. The study failed to confirm earlier claims for greater self?ideal disparity (...)
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  31. Steven Tester (2013). G.C. Lichtenberg on Self-Consciousness and Personal Identity. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 95 (3):336-359.score: 120.0
  32. Halvor Hoveid & Marit Honerød Hoveid (2008). Teachers' Identity, Self and the Process of Learning. Studies in Philosophy and Education 27 (2-3):125-136.score: 120.0
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  33. Owen J. Flanagan (1994). Multiple Identity, Character Transformation, and Self-Reclamation. In George Graham & G. Lynn Stephens (eds.), Philosophical Psychopathology. MIT Press.score: 120.0
     
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  34. Daniel Kolak & R. Martin (eds.) (1991). Self and Identity: Contemporary Philosophical Issues. Macmillan.score: 120.0
     
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  35. E. J. Lowe (2001). Identity, Composition, and the Simplicity of the Self. In Kevin J. Corcoran (ed.), Soul, Body, and Survival. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.score: 120.0
     
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  36. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2000). Intersectional Identity and the Authentic Self? Opposites Attract. In Catriona Mackenzie & Natalie Stoljar (eds.), relational autonomy. oxford university press.score: 120.0
  37. Gerald E. Myers (1997). Self-Awareness and Personal Identity. In Lewis Edwin Hahn (ed.), The Philosophy of Roderick M. Chisholm. Chicago: Open Court. 25--173.score: 120.0
     
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  38. Udo Thiel (2006). Self-Consciousness and Personal Identity. In The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Philosophy, Volume 1. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
  39. Patricia Kitcher (1982). Kant on Self-Identity. Philosophical Review 91 (1):41-72.score: 114.0
    Despite Kemp Smith's claims to the contrary, I show that there is good reason to believe that Kant was aware of Hume's attack on personal identity. My interpretive claim is that we can make sense of many of Kant's puzzling remarks in the subjective deduction by assuming that he was trying to reply to Hume's challenge. My substantive claim is that Kant succeeds in defending a notion of the self as a continuing sequence of informationally interdependent states.
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  40. Stephen David Ross (2010). Self Identity. International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:75-95.score: 114.0
    Possession is preeminently the form in which the other becomes the same, by becoming mine. (Levinas, TI, 46)If perceptions are distinct existences, they form a whole only by being connected together. But no connexions among distinct existences are ever discoverable by human understanding. We only feel a connexion or determination of the thought to pass from one object to another. It follows, therefore, that the thought alone feels personal identity, when reflecting on the train of past perceptions that compose a (...)
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  41. Guy Kahane (2009). Non-Identity, Self-Defeat, and Attitudes to Future Children. Philosophical Studies 145 (2):193 - 214.score: 108.0
    Although most people believe that it is morally wrong to intentionally create children who have an impairment, it is widely held that we cannot criticize such procreative choices unless we find a solution to Parfit’s non-identity problem. I argue that we can. Jonathan Glover has recently argued that, in certain circumstances, such choices would be self-defeating even if morally permissible. I argue that although the scope of Glover’s argument is too limited, it nevertheless directs attention to a moral defect in (...)
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  42. Stephan Blatti (2008). Review: Raymond Martin and John Barresi: The Rise and Fall of Soul and Self: An Intellectual History of Personal Identity. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (465):191-195.score: 108.0
    This is a review of Raymond Martin and John Barresi's The Rise and Fall of Soul and Self: An Intellectual History of Personal Identity (Columbia University Press, 2006).
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  43. Morwenna Griffiths (1995). Feminisms and the Self: The Web of Identity. Routledge.score: 108.0
    Feminisms and the Self is both a critique and a construction of feminist philosophy, bringing an original contribution to the current debate surrounding identity and subjectivity. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
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  44. Arto Laitinen, Charles Taylor and Paul Ricoeur on Self-Interpretations and Narrative Identity.score: 102.0
    In this chapter I discuss Charles Taylor's and Paul Ricoeur's theories of narrative identity and narratives as a central form of self-interpretation.1 Both Taylor and Ricoeur think that self-identity is a matter of culturally and socially mediated self-definitions, which are practically relevant for one's orientation in life.2 First, I will go through various characterisations that Ricoeur gives of his theory, and try to show to what extent they also apply to Taylor's theory. Then, I will analyse more closely Charles (...)
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  45. Stan Klein (2013). The Sense of Diachronic Personal Identity. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):791-811.score: 102.0
    In this paper, I first consider a famous objection that the standard interpretation of the Lockean account of diachronicity (i.e., one’s sense of personal identity over time) via psychological connectedness falls prey to breaks in one’s personal narrative. I argue that recent case studies show that while this critique may hold with regard to some long-term autobiographical self-knowledge (e.g., episodic memory), it carries less warrant with respect to accounts based on trait-relevant, semantic self-knowledge. The second issue I address concerns the (...)
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  46. Fabrice Teroni & Julien A. Deonna (2009). The Self of Shame. In Mikko Salmela & Verena Mayer (eds.), Emotions, Ethics, and Authenticity. John Benjamins.score: 102.0
    The evaluations involved in shame are, intuitively at least, of many different sorts. One feels ashamed when seen by others doing something one would prefer doing alone (social shame). One is ashamed because of one’s ugly nose (shame about permanent traits). One feels ashamed of one’s dishonest behavior (moral shame), etc. The variety of evaluations in shame is striking; and it is even more so if one takes a cross-cultural perspective on this emotion. So the difficulty – the “unity problem” (...)
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  47. Leslie A. Howe (2005). Queer Revelations: Desire, Identity, and Self-Deceit. Philosophical Forum 36 (3):221–242.score: 102.0
    I argue that understanding the self in terms of narrative construction does not preclude the possibility of error concerning one’s own self. Identity is a projection of first and second-order desires and a product of choice in relation to desire. Self-deceit appears in this connection as a response to an identity that one has constructed through choice and/or desire but not acknowledged in one’s self-account, reflecting a conflict between desires or a motivated failure to account. This analysis is applied primarily (...)
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  48. Jon Anderson (2004). The Ties That Bind? Self- and Place-Identity in Environmental Direct Action. Ethics, Place and Environment 7 (1 & 2):45 – 57.score: 102.0
    This paper explores what happens to the identity of self when entering a place of protest, and what happens to it on leaving. In short, it explores the relations between identities of self and place. Acknowledging the presence of a multiplicity of identities in relation to both notions, it examines the ways in which aspects of the self influence place, and conversely, how aspects of place influence the self. By using empirical examples from Environmental Direct Action, the paper follows Casey (...)
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  49. Darryl W. Coulthard (2010). Catching Gender-Identity Production in Flight: Making the Commonplace Visible. Journal of Research Practice 5 (2):Article M5.score: 102.0
    The purpose of this article is to develop and illustrate an approach for making the commonplace visible in a natural, as opposed to manipulated, social setting. The key research task was to find a way of capturing the ongoing production or enactment of the self that provides some insight into the way in which it is produced in a routine, matter of fact way. The article takes a number of steps to develop a research approach to the task. First, gender-identity (...)
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