Search results for 'Self-interest' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John Lemos (2006). Morality, Self-Interest, and Two Kinds of Prudential Practical Rationality. Philosophia 34 (1):85-93.score: 240.0
    : In this article it is assumed that human goodness is to be judged with respect to how well one does at practical reasoning. It is acknowledged that (1) there is a difference between moral practical reasoning (MPR) and prudential practical reasoning (PPR) and (2) what these would recommend sometimes conflict. A distinction is then made between absolute PPR and relative PPR and it is argued that doing well at absolute PPR is always consistent with MPR. It is also argued (...)
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  2. Kelly Rogers (ed.) (1997). Self-Interest: An Anthology of Philosophical Perspectives. Routledge.score: 240.0
    Human beings naturally care a great deal for themselves--and couldn't survive otherwise. As Aquinas observed, the drive for self-preservation is the first law of nature. Yet in the imperative of self-love, philosophers have also perceived a tacit threat. Plato reminds us that 'the excessive love of self is in reality the source to each man of all offences.' And so the inevitability of self- concern must be balanced with its manifest potential for harm. But how is such a reconciliation possible? (...)
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  3. M. Ali Khan (2004). Self-Interest, Self-Deception and the Ethics of Commerce. Journal of Business Ethics 52 (2):189-206.score: 240.0
    On taking the common distinction between the legal and the ethical as a point of departure, and in an effort to understand Marshall's approach to self-interest, and thereby to his conception of an ethics of commerce, I read three of his essays in the light of some non-technical writings of Frank Hahn and three other Cambridge intellectuals. My larger project connects self-interest and self-deception to a possible ethics of theorizing in economics, and thereby to the ethics of the (...)
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  4. Jan C. Heller (2012). Medical Professionalism, Revenue Enhancement, and Self-Interest: An Ethically Ambiguous Association. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 24 (4):307-315.score: 240.0
    This article explores the association between medical professionalism, revenue enhancement, and self-interest. Utilizing the sociological literature, I begin by characterizing professionalism generally and medical professionalism particularly. I then consider “pay for performance” mechanisms as an example of one way physicians might be incentivized to improve their professionalism and, at the same time, enhance their revenue. I suggest that the concern discussed in much of the medical professionalism literature that physicians might act on the basis of self-interest is over-generalized, (...)
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  5. George W. Watson & Farooq Sheikh (2008). Normative Self-Interest or Moral Hypocrisy?: The Importance of Context. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):259 - 269.score: 240.0
    We re-examine the construct of Moral Hypocrisy from the perspective of normative self-interest. Arguing that some degree of self-interest is culturally acceptable and indeed expected, we postulate that a pattern of behavior is more indicative of moral hypocrisy than a single action. Contrary to previous findings, our results indicate that a significant majority of subjects (N = 136) exhibited fair behavior, and that ideals of caring and fairness, when measured in context of the scenario, were predictive of those (...)
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  6. Anita Kim (2014). The Curious Case of Self‐Interest: Inconsistent Effects and Ambivalence Toward a Widely Accepted Construct. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (1):99-122.score: 240.0
    Self-interest is widely accepted as a powerful motivator by both academics and laypeople alike. However, research surrounding the self-interest motive paints a complicated picture of this most important psychological construct. Additionally, research on the social desirability of self-interest has revealed that despite its widespread acceptance, people do not readily accept that self-interest drives their own behaviors. This paper reviews the literature on self-interest and reveals several curious features surrounding its actual effect on helping behaviors, political (...)
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  7. Saffron Clackson (2008). Ronald Dworkin's “Prudent Insurance” Ideal for Healthcare: Idealisations of Circumstance, Prudence and Self-Interest. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (1):31-38.score: 240.0
    I will focus on Dworkin’s use of idealisation in his “Prudent Insurance” Ideal for healthcare. Dworkin identifies problems with the circumstances under which people make their insurance decisions in the current United States healthcare system and he sees these as being the cause of strange resource allocation outcomes. He therefore imagines idealising away these prima facie unjust circumstances to develop a hypothetical market in which people are able to make better decisions (Section “Idealisation of Circumstance”). I will identify two further (...)
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  8. Nir Eisikovits (2010). Proportionality and Self-Interest. Human Rights Review 11 (2):157-170.score: 240.0
    This paper offers a justification of the principle of military proportionality that is based in considerations of self-interest. By offering such a justification, I hope to vindicate the principle on the basis of the least controversial argument available. The war between Israel and Hezbollah in the summer of 2006 is used as a case study. Part 1 surveys recent work on military proportionality and suggests that the importance of this principle has increased in the age of asymmetrical warfare. Part (...)
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  9. Jennifer Kish-Gephart, James Detert, Linda Klebe Treviño, Vicki Baker & Sean Martin (2013). Situational Moral Disengagement: Can the Effects of Self-Interest Be Mitigated? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 125 (2):1-19.score: 240.0
    Self-interest has long been recognized as a powerful human motive. Yet, much remains to be understood about the thinking behind self-interested pursuits. Drawing from multiple literatures, we propose that situations high in opportunity for self-interested gain trigger a type of moral cognition called moral disengagement that allows the individual to more easily disengage internalized moral standards. We also theorize two countervailing forces—situational harm to others and dispositional conscientiousness—that may weaken the effects of personal gain on morally disengaged reasoning. We (...)
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  10. Peter Singer (1995/1997). How Are We to Live?: Ethics in an Age of Self-Interest. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
    B'Imagine that you could choose a book that everyone in the world would read. My choice would be this book.' Roger Crisp, Ethics -/- Many people have an uneasy feeling that they may be missing out on something basic that would give their lives a significance it currently lacks. But how should we live? What is there to stop us behaving selfishly? In a highly readable account which makes reference to a wide variety of sources and everyday issues, Peter Singer (...)
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  11. Justin Tiwald (2011). Dai Zhen's Defense of Self-Interest. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (s):29-45.score: 224.0
    This paper is devoted to explicating Dai Zhen’s defense of self-interested desires, over and against a tradition that sets strict limits to their range and function in moral agency. I begin by setting the terms of the debate between Dai and his opponents, noting that the dispute turns largely on the moral status of directly self-interested desires, or desires for one’s own good as such. I then consider three of Dai’s arguments against views that miscategorize or undervalue directly self-interested desires. (...)
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  12. Lawrence R. Cima & Thomas L. Schubeck (2001). Self-Interest, Love, and Economic Justice: A Dialogue Between Classical Economic Liberalism and Catholic Social Teaching. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (3):213 - 231.score: 216.0
    This essay seeks to start a dialogue between two traditions that historically have interpreted the economy in opposing ways: the individualism of classic economic liberalism (CEL), represented by Adam Smith and Milton Friedman, and the communitarianism of Catholic social teaching (CST), interpreted primarily through the teachings of popes and secondarily the U.S. Catholic bishops. The present authors, an economist and a moral theologian who identify with one or the other of the two traditions, strive to clarify objectively their similarities and (...)
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  13. Susan Wolf (1986). Self-Interest and Interest in Selves. Ethics 96 (July):704-20.score: 210.0
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  14. Ralph Wedgwood (2007). Butler on Virtue, Self-Interest, and Human Nature. In Paul Bloomfield (ed.), Morality and Self-Interest. Oxford University Press.score: 210.0
    This essay gives a new interpretation of some of the central ethical doctrines of Bishop Butler's Sermons -- in particular, of his claim that a review of the empirical facts of human nature shows that we have "an obligation to the practice of virtue", and of the precise claims that he makes about the relations between morality and self-interest.
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  15. Paul Bloomfield (ed.) (2008). Morality and Self-Interest. Oxford University Press.score: 210.0
    The volume will act as a useful collection of scholarship by top figures, and as a resource and course book on an important topic.
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  16. Benjamin L. Curtis (2008). Non-Therapeutic Modification and Self-Interest: Reply to Schramme. Bioethics 22 (8):455-456.score: 210.0
    In this article I reply to Thomas Schramme's argument that there are no good reasons for the prohibition of severe forms of voluntary non-therapeutic body modification. I argue that on paternalistic assumptions there is, in fact, a perfectly good reason.
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  17. R. Martin (1992). Self-Interest and Survival. American Philosophical Quarterly 29 (4):319-30.score: 210.0
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  18. Y. Sandy Berkovski (2014). Gratitude, Self-Interest, and Love. Philosophia 42 (3):645-664.score: 210.0
    Gratitude is usually conceived as a uniquely appropriate response to goodwill. A grateful person is bound to reward an act of goodwill in some appropriately proportionate way. I argue that goodwill, when interpreted as love, should require no reward. Consequently, the idea of gratitude as a proportionate response to love is not intelligible. However, goodwill can also be understood merely as a disinterested concern. Such forms of goodwill are involved in reciprocal relationships. But gratitude has no place in these relationships (...)
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  19. Niek Hoogervorst, David De Cremer & Marius van Dijke (2010). Why Leaders Not Always Disapprove of Unethical Follower Behavior: It Depends on the Leader's Self-Interest and Accountability. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (1):29-41.score: 210.0
    By showing disapproval of unethical follower behavior (UFB), leaders help creating an ethical climate in their organization in which it is clear what is morally acceptable or not. In this research, we examine factors influencing whether leaders consistently show such disapproval. Specifically, we argue that holding leaders accountable for their actions should motivate them to disapprove of UFB. However, this effect of accountability should be inhibited when leaders personally benefit from UFB. This prediction was supported in a lab experiment. Furthermore, (...)
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  20. Bill Jordan (1989). The Common Good: Citizenship, Morality, and Self-Interest. Blackwell.score: 210.0
     
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  21. Jack Barbalet (2014). Greater Self, Lesser Self: Dimensions of Self‐Interest in Chinese Filial Piety. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (2):186-205.score: 208.0
    While self-interest is depreciated in Confucian ethics the processes of family relations in traditional China are animated by the self-interested actions of family members. The paper outlines the Confucian ideology of filial piety which is commensurate with the governance of family life organized hierarchically and through the senior male's management of the joint-family's collective property. The structure, operations and principles of membership in traditional Chinese families are indicated, highlighting the tensions within them between consanguinity and conjugality and their material (...)
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  22. Neera Badhwar (1993). Altruism Versus Self-Interest: Sometimes a False Dichotomy. Social Philosophy and Policy 10 (1):90-117.score: 180.0
    In the moral philosophy of the last two centuries, altruism of one kind or another has typically been regarded as identical with moral concern. When self-regarding duties have been recognized, motivation by duty has been sharply distinguished from motivation by self-interest. I think this view is wrong: self-interest can be the motive of a moral act. My chief concern is to argue that self-interested action -- i.e., action motivated by rational self-interest -- can be moral, but the (...)
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  23. Jacob Ross, Personal Identity and the Irrelevance of Self-Interest.score: 180.0
    Self-interest is widely regarded as an important, if not as the only, source of reasons for action, and hence it is widely held that one can rationally give special weight to one’s self-interest in deciding how to act. In what follows, I will argue against this view. I will do so by following the lead of Derek Parfit, and considering cases in which personal identity appears to break down. My argument will differ from Parfit’s, however, in that it (...)
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  24. Paul R. Goldin (2001). Han Fei's Doctrine of Self-Interest. Asian Philosophy 11 (3):151 – 159.score: 180.0
    Chapter 49 of the Han Feizi, entitled 'Wudu' ('The Five Vermin'), includes one of the earliest discussions in Chinese history of the concepts of gong and si: Han Fei (d. 233 B.C.) takes si to mean 'acting in one's own interest'. Gong is simply what opposes si. 'Acting in one's own interest' is not inherently reprehensible in Han Fei's view; but a ruler must remember why ministers propose their policies: they are concerned only with enriching themselves, and look upon the (...)
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  25. Ian Maitland (2002). The Human Face of Self-Interest. Journal of Business Ethics 38 (1-2):3 - 17.score: 180.0
    Moralists tend to have a low opinion of self-interest. It is seen as force that has to be controlled or transcended. This essay tries to get beyond the bifurcation of human motivations into self-interest (which is seen as vicious or non-moral) and concern for others (which is virtuous). It argues that there are some surprising affinities between self-interest and morality. Notably the principal force that checks self-interest is self-interest itself. Consequently, self-interest often coincides with (...)
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  26. Michael Nill (1985). Morality and Self-Interest in Protagoras, Antiphon, and Democritus. E.J. Brill.score: 180.0
    CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION One of Plato's major concerns in his moral theory was to show that acting morally benefits agents and promotes their self-interest. ...
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  27. Paul W. Allen & Chee K. Ng (2001). Self Interest Among CPAs May Influence Their Moral Reasoning. Journal of Business Ethics 33 (1):29 - 35.score: 180.0
    In 1990, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued a consent order to the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). The order decreed the AICPA to lessen its longstanding ethics code which had until then banned the receipts of commissions, referral fees and contingent fees. The FTC alleged that the AICPA banned receipt of the fees as an attempt to restrain trade (FTC, 1990).In the present study, we sought to determine if CPAs'' preference for bans on commissions, referral fees and (...)
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  28. Donald E. Frey (1998). Individualist Economic Values and Self-Interest: The Problem in the Puritan Ethic. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (14):1573-1580.score: 180.0
    The Puritan ethic is conventionally interpreted as a set of individualistic values that encourage a degree of self-interest inimical to the good of organizations and society. A closer reading of original Puritan moralists reveals a different ethic. Puritan moralists simultaneously legitimated economic individualism while urging individuals to work for the common good. They contrasted self-interest and the common good, which they understood to be the sinful and moral ends, respectively, of economic individualism. This polarity can be found in (...)
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  29. Steven L. Grover & Chun Hui (1994). The Influence of Role Conflict and Self-Interest on Lying in Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 13 (4):295 - 303.score: 180.0
    The self-interest paradigm predicts that unethical behavior occurs when such behavior benefits the actor. A recent model of lying behavior, however, predicts that lying behavior results from an individual''s inability to meet conflicting role demands. The need to reconcile the self-interest and role conflict theories prompted the present study, which orthogonally manipulated the benefit from lying and the conflicting role demands. A model integrating the two theories predicts the results, which showed that both elements — (...)
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  30. David L. Martinson (1994). Enlightened Self-Interest Fails as an Ethical Baseline in Public Relations. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 9 (2):100 – 108.score: 180.0
    Some in public relations have suggested that practitioners adopt a philosophy of enlightened self-interest as an ethical baseline. The author contends that such a theory must be rejected because even the enlightened variety does not adequately weigh the needs of significant others - a central consideration in any effort to define ethical behavior. The author maintains that genuine sacrifice - at times required of those desiring to do the right thing - clearly can conflict with any theory espousing (...) as a baseline. Further, there is a social dimension to ethics. By virtue of occupational title, the author holds that public relations practitioners have a particular responsibility to advance the social order. Ethical behavior - especially as it relates to public relations - must go well beyond a narrow concern that no injustice is done to individual persons. (shrink)
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  31. Diana Meyers, Part 2.5: Interests, Self-Interest and Autonomy.score: 180.0
    Part II. Section 5. Interests, Self-Interest and Autonomy: Two questions drive this chapter: 1) What kinds of things can be objects of autonomous choices? and 2) How are these related to an individual's authentic self? If self-interest is construed as securing a set of basic goods for oneself, personal autonomy and self-interest can collide. Still, Meyers holds that autonomy based on exercising autonomy competency is compatible with the dominance principle, which counsels opting for a course of action (...)
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  32. Michael C. Munger (2011). Self-Interest and Public Interest: The Motivations of Political Actors. Critical Review 23 (3):339-357.score: 180.0
    ABSTRACT Self-Interest and Public Interest in Western Politics showed that the public, politicians, and bureaucrats are often public spirited. But this does not invalidate public-choice theory. Public-choice theory is an ideal type, not a claim that self-interest explains all political behavior. Instead, public-choice theory is useful in creating rules and institutions that guard against the worst case, which would be universal self-interestedness in politics. In contrast, the public-interest hypothesis is neither a comprehensive explanation of political behavior nor a (...)
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  33. David M. Holley (2002). Self-Interest and Integrity. International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (1):5-22.score: 180.0
    Philosophical discussions of the conflict between morality and self-interest typically proceed on the assumption that we have a relatively unproblematic understanding of self-interest. That assumption can be challenged by asking how to relate acts of self-interest and acts of integrity. I argue that when we are talking about motivations, it is better to keep the motivation of self-interest distinct from the motivation of integrity. But the term “self-interest” can also be used to refer to an (...)
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  34. Cristi K. Lindblom & Robert G. Ruland (1997). Functionalist and Conflict Views of AICPA Code of Conduct: Public Interest Vs. Self Interest. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (5):573-582.score: 180.0
    The sociological models of functionalism and conflict are introduced and utilized to analyze professionalism in the accounting profession as it is manifest in the American Institute of Certified Public Accountant's Code of Conduct. Rule 203 of the Code and provisions of the Code related to the public interest are examined using semiotic analysis to determine if they are most consistent with the functionalist or conflict models. While the analysis does not address intent of the Code, it is determined that the (...)
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  35. Wesley Cragg (2012). Ethics, Enlightened Self-Interest, and the Corporate Responsibility to Respect Human Rights. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (1):9-36.score: 180.0
    Central to the United Nations Framework setting out the human rights responsibilities of corporations proposed by John Ruggie is the principle that corporations have a responsibility to respect human rights in their operations whether or not doing so is required by law and whether or not human rights laws are actively enforced. Ruggie proposes that corporations should respect this principle in their strategic management and day-to-day operations for reasons of corporate (enlightened) self-interest. This paper identifies this as a serious (...)
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  36. R. B. Brandt (1991). Overvold on Self-Interest and Self-Sacrifice. Journal of Philosophical Research 16:353-363.score: 180.0
    In order to explain the idea that sacrifice involves voluntary diminution of the agent’s well-being, “well-being” must be explained. The thesis that an agent’s well-being just consists in the occurrence of events wanted is rejected. Overvold replaces it by the view that the motivating desires involve the existence of the agent, alive, at the time of their satisfaction. This view seems counterintuitive. The whole desire-satisfaction theory is to be rejected partly because we dont’t think an event worthwile if it is (...)
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  37. D. Roderick Kiewiet & Michael S. Lewis-Beck (2011). No Man is an Island: Self-Interest, the Public Interest, and Sociotropic Voting. Critical Review 23 (3):303-319.score: 180.0
    ABSTRACT Four decades ago, Gerald Kramer showed that economic conditions affect electoral outcomes. Some researchers took this to mean that voters were self-interested, voting their ?pocketbooks,? while others, such as Leif Lewin, took it to mean that voters were sociotropic, motivated by the public interest?and therefore altruistic. It is important, however, to avoid conflating sociotropic voters with altruistic ones. Voters might be voting in favor of politicians or parties that they think will further the public interest as an indirect (...)
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  38. Dennis C. Mueller (2011). The Importance of Self-Interest and Public Interest in Politics. Critical Review 23 (3):321-338.score: 180.0
    ABSTRACT In its attempt to prove that voters, politicians, and bureaucrats are motivated by the public interest, Self-Interest and Public Interest in Western Politics overlooks a great deal of public-choice research, to which much has been added during the two decades since it was published. The importance of self-interest at both the micro and macro levels of politics becomes clear once one looks not simply at the ?inputs? of a democracy but at its ?outputs? as well. The prevalence (...)
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  39. Daniel John Zizzo (2005). Economic Man: Self-Interest and Rational Choice. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):837-838.score: 180.0
    “Economic man” assumes not only self-interest, but also rationality of choices. The finding that ultimatum game offers can be explained by ambiguity aversion as well as pessimism, plus other findings, suggests the usefulness of taking bounded rationality more into account. Neurodevelopmental and heritability research supports the authors' emphasis on the importance of social learning and socialization.
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  40. Connie S. Rosati (2009). Self-Interest and Self-Sacrifice. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 109 (1pt3):311 - 325.score: 180.0
    Stephen Darwall has recently suggested (following work by Mark Overvold) that theories which identify a person’s good with her own ranking of concerns do not properly delimit the ‘scope’ of welfare, making self-sacrifice conceptually impossible. But whether a theory of welfare makes self-sacrifice impossible depends on what self-sacrifice is. I offer an alternative analysis to Overvold’s, explaining why self-interest and self-sacrifice need not be opposed, and so why the problems of delimiting the scope of welfare and of allowing for (...)
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  41. Mark Van Vugt (2001). Self-Interest as Self-Fulfilling Prophecy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):429-430.score: 180.0
    The adoption of experimental methods from economics, in particular script-enactment, performance-related payment, and the absence of deception, will turn experimental social psychology into a trivial science subject. Such procedures force participants to conform to a normative expectation that they must behave rationally and in accordance with their self-interest. The self-fulfilling prophecy inherent in these procedures makes it more difficult to conduct innovative social-psychological research.
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  42. Farhad Rassekh (2000). Smith, Friedman, and Self-Interest in Ethical Society. Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (3):659-674.score: 180.0
    We examine the writings of Adam Smith and Milton Friedman regarding their interpretation and use of the concept of self-interest.We argue that neither Smith nor Friedman considers self-interest to be synonymous with selfishness and thus devoid of ethicalconsiderations. Rather, for both writers self-interest embodies an other-regarding aspect that requires individuals to moderate theiractions when others are adversely affected. The overriding virtue for Smith in governing individual actions is justice; for Friedman it isnon-coercion.
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  43. Christian Maurer (2013). Self-Interest and Sociability. In James A. Harris (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press. 291-314.score: 180.0
    The chapter analyses the debates on the relation between self-interest and sociability in eighteenth-century British moral philosophy. It focuses on the selfish hypothesis, i.e. on the egoistic theory that we are only motivated by self-interest or self-love, and that our sociability is not based on disinterested affections, such as benevolence. The selfish hypothesis is much debated especially in the early eighteenth century (Mandeville, Shaftesbury, Hutcheson, Butler, Clarke, Campbell, Gay), and then rather tacitly accepted (Hartley, Tucker, Paley) or rejected (...)
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  44. Tommi Vehkavaara (2003). Natural Self-Interest, Interactive Representation, and the Emergence of Objects and Umwelt. Sign Systems Studies 31 (2):547-586.score: 180.0
    In biosemiotics, life and living phenomena are described by means of originally anthropomorphic semiotic concepts. This can be justified if we can show that living systems as self-maintaining far from equilibrium systems create and update some kind of representation about the conditions of their self-maintenance. The point of view is the one of semiotic realism where signs and representations are considered as real and objective natural phenomena without any reference to the specifically human interpreter. It is argued that the most (...)
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  45. Florien M. Cramwinckel, David Cremer & Marius Dijke (2013). Dirty Hands Make Dirty Leaders?! The Effects of Touching Dirty Objects on Rewarding Unethical Subordinates as a Function of a Leader's Self-Interest. Journal of Business Ethics 115 (1):93-100.score: 180.0
    We studied the role of social dynamics in moral decision-making and behavior by investigating how physical sensations of dirtiness versus cleanliness influence moral behavior in leader–subordinate relationships, and whether a leader’s self-interest functions as a boundary condition to this effect. A pilot study (N = 78) revealed that when participants imagined rewarding (vs. punishing) unethical behavior of a subordinate, they felt more dirty. Our main experiment (N = 96) showed that directly manipulating dirtiness by allowing leaders to touch a (...)
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  46. Jay R. Harmon (2001). Notions of Self-Interest: Reflections on the Intersection Between Contingency and Applied Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 23 (4):377-389.score: 180.0
    If agents motivated only by self-interested reasons practice different degrees of ethical environmental behavior at least partly because they hold different notions of what is in their self-interest, then the nature of our self-interest conceptions is a central issue in environmental ethics. Unless set by biology, as seems unlikely from the evidence, the breadth of the individual self-interest conception we each develop must depend on the specific experiences we are each contingently exposed to in our lives. If (...)
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  47. Jessica L. Kimpell (forthcoming). Republican Civic Virtue, Enlightened Self-Interest and Tocqueville. European Journal of Political Theory:1474885114546139.score: 180.0
    Tocqueville’s claim in Democracy in America about the link between associations and a vibrant public sphere is interpreted especially by neo-republicans in political theory as aligned with their argument that civic virtue can and ought to be fostered in today’s democracies. This paper challenges such a reading of Tocqueville by considering his notion of enlightened self-interest. Tocqueville’s ideas about the nature of political activity differ markedly from the republican ideal of a citizenry marked by civic virtue, as Tocqueville appeals (...)
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  48. Kelly Rogers (ed.) (1997). Self-Interest: An Anthology of Philosophical Perspectives From Antiquity to the Present. Routledge.score: 180.0
    Self-Interest discusses the reconciliation of inevitable self-concern with its manifest potential for harm. This anthology brings together the efforts of twenty three renown philosophers to address the matter of how to bring about such a reconciliation. The drive for self-preservation, as observed by Aquinas, is the first law of nature. With this self-love, however, comes the threat of "the excessive love of self". Self-Interest brings into discussion the reconciliation of necessary self-concern with its manifest potential for harm. This (...)
     
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  49. James B. Wilbur (1988). Self-Interest and Community. Journal of Business Ethics 7 (6):453 - 458.score: 176.0
    In advocating that we extend our experiment in political democracy in America to include economic democracy as well, the Bishops' Letter assumes the basic social nature of man. This leaves an enormous gap between the values and attitudes they recommend and the private and individualistic view of man that undergirds our traditional economic thinking.This essay attempts to bridge that gap in terms of a theory of practice, individual in emphasis, but bringing out the enabling conditions of any and all practice (...)
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  50. David P. Gauthier (1970). Morality and Rational Self-Interest. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.,Prentice-Hall.score: 174.0
    Reason, egoism, and utilitarianism, by H. Sidgwick.--Is egoism reasonable? By G. E. Moore.--Ultimate principles and ethical egoism, by B. Medlin.--In defense of egoism, by J. Kalin.--Virtuous affections and self-love, by F. Hutcheson.--Our obligation to virtue, by D. Hume.--Duty and interest, by H. A. Prichard.--The natural condition of mankind and the laws of nature, by T. Hobbes.--Why should we be moral? By K. Baier.--Morality and advantage, by D. P. Gauthier.--Bibliographical essay (p. 181-184).
     
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