Search results for 'Self-knowledge, Theory of' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Peter Carruthers (2011). The Opacity of Mind: An Integrative Theory of Self-Knowledge. OUP Oxford.score: 300.0
    It is widely believed that people have privileged and authoritative access to their own thoughts, and many theories have been proposed to explain this supposed fact. The Opacity of Mind challenges the consensus view and subjects the theories in question to critical scrutiny, while showing that they are not protected against the findings of cognitive science by belonging to a separate 'explanatory space'. The book argues that our access to our own thoughts is almost always interpretive, grounded in perceptual awareness (...)
     
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  2. Shadi Bartsch (2006). The Mirror of the Self: Sexuality, Self-Knowledge, and the Gaze in the Early Roman Empire. University of Chicago Press.score: 237.0
    People in the ancient world thought of vision as both an ethical tool and a tactile sense, akin to touch. Gazing upon someone—or oneself—was treated as a path to philosophical self-knowledge, but the question of tactility introduced an erotic element as well. In The Mirror of the Self , Shadi Bartsch asserts that these links among vision, sexuality, and self-knowledge are key to the classical understanding of the self. Weaving together literary theory, philosophy, and social history, Bartsch traces this (...)
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  3. Tillmann Vierkant (2012). Self Knowledge and Knowing Other Minds: The Implicit / Explicit Distinction as a Tool in Understanding Theory of Mind. British Journal of Developmental Psychology 30 (1):141-155.score: 201.0
    Holding content explicitly requires a form of self knowledge. But what does the relevant self knowledge look like? Using theory of mind as an example, this paper argues that the correct answer to this question will have to take into account the crucial role of language based deliberation, but warns against the standard assumption that explicitness is necessary for ascribing awareness. It argues in line with Bayne that intentional action is at least an equally valid criterion for awareness. This (...)
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  4. Terence Ball (1980). Dangerous Knowledge? The Self-Subversion of Social Deviance Theory. Inquiry 23 (4):377 – 395.score: 193.5
    Some sociological theories yield self-subverting or 'dangerous' knowledge. The functionalist theory of social deviance provides a case in point. The theory, first formulated by Durkheim, maintains that ostensibly anti-social deviants perform a number of socially indispensable functions. But what would happen if everyone knew this? They would cease to regard deviants as malefactors and would indeed come to esteem them as public benefactors. In that case, however, deviants could no longer perform their proper function. If they are to (...)
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  5. Brie Gertler (2011). Self-Knowledge. Routledge.score: 192.0
    The problem of self-knowledge is one of the most fascinating in all of philosophy and has crucial significance for the philosophy of mind and epistemology. Gertler assesses the leading theoretical approaches to self-knowledge, explaining the work of many of the key figures in the field: from Descartes and Kant, through to Bertrand Russell and Gareth Evans, as well as recent work by Tyler Burge, David Chalmers, William Lycan and Sydney Shoemaker. -/- Beginning with an outline of the distinction between self-knowledge (...)
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  6. Śaṅkarācārya (2012). Self Knowledge: Adi Shankaracharya's 68 Verse Treatise on the Philosophy of Nondualism: The Absolute Oneness of Ultimate Reality. New Age Books.score: 187.5
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  7. Śaṅkarācārya (1946). Self-Knowledge (Ātmabodha): An English Translation of Śankarāchārya's Ātmabodha with Notes, Comments, and Introduction. Ramakrishna-Vivekananda Center.score: 187.5
     
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  8. Roy Eugene Davis (2012). Self Knowledge: Adi Shankaracharya's 68 Verse Treatise on the Philosophy of Nondualism: The Absolute Oneness of Ultimate Reality. New Age Books.score: 187.5
     
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  9. Garth Green (2010). The Aporia of Inner Sense: The Self-Knowledge of Reason and the Critique of Metaphysics in Kant. Brill.score: 187.5
  10. Genevieve Lloyd (1994). Part of Nature: Self-Knowledge in Spinoza's Ethics. Cornell University Press.score: 187.5
  11. Michael Novak (1965/1986). Belief and Unbelief: A Philosophy of Self-Knowledge: With a New Preface. University Press of America.score: 187.5
  12. Saṅkarācārya (1964). Self-Knowledge (Ātma-Bodha) of Śrí Śaṅkarācārya. Madras, Akhila Bharata Sankara Seva Samiti.score: 187.5
     
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  13. J. F. H. van Rappard (1979). Psychology as Self-Knowledge: The Development of the Concept of the Mind in German Rationalistic Psychology and its Relevance Today. Van Gorcum.score: 187.5
  14. Avula Parthasarathy (1971). Atma Bodha (Knowledge of the Self) of Sri Sankaracharya. Bombay,Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan.score: 183.0
     
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  15. Ben Phillips (2014). Indirect Representation and the Self-Representational Theory of Consciousness. Philosophical Studies 167 (2):273-290.score: 175.5
    According to Uriah Kriegel’s self-representational theory of consciousness, mental state M is conscious just in case it is a complex with suitably integrated proper parts, M 1 and M 2, such that M 1 is a higher-order representation of lower-order representation M 2. Kriegel claims that M thereby “indirectly” represents itself, and he attempts to motivate this claim by appealing to what he regards as intuitive cases of indirect perceptual and pictorial representation. For example, Kriegel claims that it’s natural (...)
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  16. Brie Gertler, Self-Knowledge. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 174.0
    "Self-knowledge" is commonly used in philosophy to refer to knowledge of one's particular mental states, including one's beliefs, desires, and sensations. It is also sometimes used to refer to knowledge about a persisting self -- its ontological nature, identity conditions, or character traits. At least since Descartes, most philosophers have believed that self-knowledge is importantly different from knowledge of the world external to oneself, including others' thoughts. But there is little agreement about what precisely distinguishes self-knowledge from knowledge in other (...)
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  17. Mohammadreza Zolfagharian, Reza Akbari & Hamidreza Fartookzadeh (forthcoming). Theory of Knowledge in System Dynamics Models. Foundations of Science:1-19.score: 174.0
    Having entered into the problem structuring methods, system dynamics (SD) is an approach, among systems’ methodologies, which claims to recognize the main structures of socio-economic behaviors. However, the concern for building or discovering strong philosophical underpinnings of SD, undoubtedly playing an important role in the modeling process, is a long-standing issue, in a way that there is a considerable debate about the assumptions or the philosophical foundations of it. In this paper, with a new perspective, we have explored theory (...)
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  18. Pi-Yueh Cheng & Mei-Chin Chu (2013). Behavioral Factors Affecting Students' Intentions to Enroll in Business Ethics Courses: A Comparison of the Theory of Planned Behavior and Social Cognitive Theory Using Self-Identity as a Moderator. Journal of Business Ethics:1-12.score: 174.0
    The current study used both Ajzen’s theory of planned behavior (TPB) and Bandura’s social cognitive theory (SCT) to examine the intentions of business undergraduate students toward taking elective ethics courses and investigated the role of self-identity in this process. The study was prospective in design; data on predictors and intentions were obtained during the first collection of data, whereas the actual behavior was assessed 10 days later. Our results indicated that the TPB was a better predictor of behavioral (...)
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  19. Keith Lehrer (2000). Theory of Knowledge. Westview Press.score: 172.5
    In this impressive second edition of Theory of Knowledge, Keith Lehrer introduces students to the major traditional and contemporary accounts of knowing. Beginning with the traditional definition of knowledge as justified true belief, Lehrer explores the truth, belief, and justification conditions on the way to a thorough examination of foundation theories of knowledge,the work of Platinga, externalism and naturalized epistemologies, internalism and modern coherence theories, contextualism, and recent reliabilist and causal theories. Lehrer gives all views careful examination and concludes (...)
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  20. Noah Marcelino Lemos (2007). An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.score: 172.5
    Epistemology or the theory of knowledge is one of the cornerstones of analytic philosophy, and this book provides a clear and accessible introduction to the subject. It discusses some of the main theories of justification, including foundationalism, coherentism, reliabilism, and virtue epistemology. Other topics include the Gettier problem, internalism and externalism, skepticism, the problem of epistemic circularity, the problem of the criterion, a priori knowledge, and naturalized epistemology. Intended primarily for students taking a first class in epistemology, this lucid (...)
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  21. Bertrand Russell (1992/1988). Theory of Knowledge: The 1913 Manuscript. Routledge.score: 172.5
    First published in 1984 as part of The Collected Papers of Bertrand Russell , Theory of Knowledge represents an important addition to our knowledge of Russell's thought. In this work Russell attempts to flesh out the sketch implicit in The Problems of Philosophy . It was conceived by Russell as his next major project after Principia Mathematica and was intended to provide the epistemological foundations for his work. Russell's subsequent difficulties in presenting his theory of knowledge, brought on (...)
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  22. Dan O'Brien (2006). An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge. Polity Press.score: 172.5
    An Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge guides the reader through the key issues and debates in contemporary epistemology. Lucid, comprehensive and accessible, it is an ideal textbook for students who are new to the subject and for university undergraduates. The book is divided into five parts. Part I discusses the concept of knowledge and distinguishes between different types of knowledge. Part II surveys the sources of knowledge, considering both a priori and a posteriori knowledge. Parts III and IV (...)
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  23. Alan Musgrave (1993). Common Sense, Science, and Scepticism: A Historical Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.score: 172.5
    Can we know anything for certain? There are those who think we can (traditionally labeled the "dogmatists") and those who think we cannot (traditionally labeled the "skeptics"). The theory of knowledge, or epistemology, is the great debate between the two. This book is an introductory and historically-based survey of the debate. It sides for the most part with the skeptics. It also develops out of skepticism a third view, fallibilism or critical rationalism, which incorporates an uncompromising realism about perception, (...)
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  24. Justus Hartnack (1968). Kant's Theory of Knowledge. Melbourne [Etc.]Macmillan.score: 172.5
    The significance of Kant's philosophy is to be found primarily in his theory of knowledge, a theory that is set forth in his voluminous work, The Critique ...
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  25. Thomas J. Blakeley (1964). Soviet Theory of Knowledge. Dordrecht, Holland, D. Reidel Pub. Co..score: 172.5
    THE DEVELOPMENT OF SOVIET THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE AND ITS MAIN REPRESENTATIVES By definition the philosophical treatment of knowledge is an integral part of the ...
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  26. Paul K. Moser (ed.) (1998). The Theory of Knowledge: A Thematic Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 172.5
    This book is an accessible introduction to contemporary epistemology, the theory of knowledge. It introduces traditional topics in epistemology within the context of contemporary debates about the definition, sources, and limits of human knowledge. Rich in examples and written in an engaging style, it explains the field while avoiding technical detail. It relates epistemology to work in cognitive science and defends a plausible version of explanationism regarding epistemological method.
     
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  27. Eileen Dombrowski (2007). Theory of Knowledge: Course Companion. Oxford University Press.score: 172.5
    Developed in collaboration with the International Baccalaureate Organization, Oxford's Course Companions provide extra support for students taking IB Diploma Programme courses. They present a whole-course approach with a wide range of resources, and encourage a deep understanding of each subject by making connections to wider issues and providing opportunites for critical thinking. This companion stimulates students to think about learning and knowledge from their own and from others' perspectives in a way that crosses disciplines and cultures. It encourages reflection, discussion, (...)
     
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  28. Elizabeth Ramsden Eames (1969). Bertrand Russell's Theory of Knowledge. London, Allen & Unwin.score: 172.5
    When future generations come to analyze and survey twentieth-century philosophy as a whole, Bertrand Russell’s logic and theory of knowledge is assured a place of prime importance. Yet until this book was first published in 1969 no comprehensive treatment of his epistemology had appeared. Commentators on twentieth-century philosophy at the time assumed that Russell’s important contributions to the theory of knowledge were made before 1921. This book challenges that assumption and draws attention to features of Russell’s later work (...)
     
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  29. Karl R. Popper (2009/2012). The Two Fundamental Problems of the Theory of Knowledge. Routledge.score: 172.5
    A brief historical comment on scientific knowledge as Socratic ignorance -- Some critical comments on the text of this book, particularly on the theory of truth Exposition [1933] -- Problem of Induction (Experience and Hypothesis) -- Two Fundamental Problems of the Theory of Knowledge -- Formulation of the Problem -- The problem of induction and the problem of demarcation -- Deductivtsm and Inductivism -- Comments on how the solutions are reached and preliminary presentation of the solutions -- Rationalism (...)
     
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  30. Richard van de Lagemaat (2005). Theory of Knowledge for the Ib Diploma. Cambridge University Press.score: 172.5
    This comprehensive and accessible book is designed for use by students following the Theory of Knowledge course in the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme. The book is also useful for students following other critical thinking courses. The fundamental question in Theory of Knowledge is 'How do you know? In exploring this question, the author encourages critical thinking across a range of subject areas and helps students to ask relevant questions, use language with care and precision, support ideas with (...)
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  31. Charles L. Griswold (1986/1996). Self-Knowledge in Plato's Phaedrus. Pennsylvania State University Press.score: 171.0
    In this award-winning study of the Phaedrus, Charles Griswold focuses on the theme of "self-knowledge.
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  32. Anthony E. Hatzimoysis (ed.) (2008). Self-Knowledge. Oxford University Press.score: 171.0
    The essays featured in this collection seek to deepen our understanding of self-knowledge, to solve some of the genuine (and to resolve some of the spurious) ...
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  33. James D. Marshall (2001). A Critical Theory of the Self: Wittgenstein, Nietzsche, Foucault. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (1):75-91.score: 171.0
    Critical thinking, considered as a version of informallogic, must consider emotions and personal attitudesin assessing assertions and conclusions in anyanalysis of discourse. It must therefore presupposesome notion of the self. Critical theory may be seenas providing a substantive and non-neutral positionfor the exercise of critical thinking. It thereforemust presuppose some notion of the self. This paperargues for a Foucauldean position on the self toextend critical theory and provide a particularposition on the self for critical thinking. Thisposition on the (...)
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  34. Richard W. Paul (1989). Critical Thinking in North America: A New Theory of Knowledge, Learning, and Literacy. [REVIEW] Argumentation 3 (2):197-235.score: 171.0
    The pace of change in the world is accelerating, yet educational institutions have not kept pace. Indeed, schools have historically been the most static of social institutions, uncritically passing down from generation to generation outmoded didactic, lecture-and-drill-based, models of instruction. Predictable results follow. Students, on the whole, do not learn how to work by, or think for, themselves. They do not learn how to gather, analyze, synthesize and assess information. They do not learn how to analyze the diverse logic of (...)
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  35. Plato (1957/2003). Plato's Theory of Knowledge. Dover Publications.score: 171.0
    Translated by the noted classical scholar Francis M. Cornford, this edition of two masterpieces of Plato's later period features extensive ongoing commentaries by Cornford that provide helpful background information and valuable insights. The Theatetus offers a systematic treatment of the question, "What is knowledge?" with most of the dialogue taking place between Socrates and the student Theatetus. Among the answers they explore: knowledge as perception; knowledge as true belief; knowledge as true belief plus an account (i.e., a justified true belief); (...)
     
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  36. Joshua Landy (2004). Philosophy as Fiction: Self, Deception, and Knowledge in Proust. Oxford University Press.score: 170.5
    Philosophy as Fiction seeks to account for the peculiar power of philosophical literature by taking as its case study the paradigmatic generic hybrid of the twentieth century, Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time. At once philosophical--in that it presents claims, and even deploys arguments concerning such traditionally philosophical issues as knowledge, self-deception, selfhood, love, friendship, and art--and literary, in that its situations are imaginary and its stylization inescapably prominent, Proust's novel presents us with a conundrum. How should it be (...)
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  37. R. Greene (2003). Constitutive Theories of Self-Knowledge and the Regress Problem. Philosophical Papers 32 (2):141-48.score: 169.0
    Abstract In the contemporary literature on self-knowledge discussion is framed by and large by two competing models of self-knowledge: the observational (or perceptual) model and the constitutive model. On the observational model self-knowledge is the result of ?cognitively viewing? one's mental states. Constitutive theories of self-knowledge, on the other hand, hold that self-knowledge is constitutive of intentional states. That is, self-ascription is a necessary condition for being in a particular mental state. Akeel Bilgrami is a defender of the constitutive model. (...)
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  38. Ben Bronner (2012). Problems with the Dispositional Tracking Theory of Knowledge. Logos and Episteme 3 (3):505-507.score: 168.0
    Rachael Briggs and Daniel Nolan attempt to improve on Nozick’s tracking theory of knowledge by providing a modified, dispositional tracking theory. The dispositional theory, however, faces more problems than those previously noted by John Turri. First, it is not simply that satisfaction of the theory’s conditions is unnecessary for knowledge – it is insufficient as well. Second, in one important respect, the dispositional theory is a step backwards relative to the original tracking theory: the (...)
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  39. Stanley B. Klein (2013). Klein and Loftus's Model of Trait Self-Knowledge: The Importance of Familiarizing Oneself with the Foundational Research Prior to Reading About its Neuropsychological Applications. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 168.0
    Klein and Loftus's model of trait self-knowledge: the importance of familiarizing oneself with the foundational research prior to reading about its neuropsychological applications.
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  40. Peter Carruthers (1996). Simulation and Self-Knowledge: A Defence of the Theory-Theory. In Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.), Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press. 22--38.score: 167.0
    In this chapter I attempt to curb the pretensions of simulationism. I argue that it is, at best, an epistemological doctrine of limited scope. It may explain how we go about attributing beliefs and desires to others, and perhaps to ourselves, in some cases. But simulation cannot provide the fundamental basis of our conception of, or knowledge of, minded agency.
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  41. Charles E. Larmore (2010). The Practices of the Self. The University of Chicago Press.score: 166.5
    Sartre as guide -- Bad faith and sincerity -- The example of Stendhal -- Reflection and being like another -- Being natural -- The ubiquity of convention -- Being like another -- Authenticity and the democratic age -- Mimetism and equality -- Being oneself amid conventions -- Authenticity and the nature of the self -- Foundations of a theory of cognitive reflection -- Psychological interpretation -- The structure of cognitive self-reflection -- The self in cognitive reflection -- Representing and (...)
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  42. Malcolm Ashmore (1989). The Reflexive Thesis: Wrighting Sociology of Scientific Knowledge. University of Chicago Press.score: 165.0
    This unusually innovative book treats reflexivity, not as a philosophical conundrum, but as a practical issue that arises in the course of scholarly research and argument. In order to demonstrate the concrete and consequential nature of reflexivity, Malcolm Ashmore concentrates on an area in which reflexive "problems" are acute: the sociology of scientific knowledge. At the forefront of recent radical changes in our understanding of science, this increasingly influential mode of analysis specializes in rigorous deconstructions of the research practices and (...)
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  43. Adrienne S. Chambon & Allan Irving (2003). “They Give Reason a Responsibility Which It Simply Can't Bear”: Ethics, Care of the Self, and Caring Knowledge. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 24 (3-4):265-278.score: 165.0
    We explore briefly Foucault's ideas about the care of the self, creating ourselves and what he meant by ethics. We then examine the work of five artists–Mark Rothko, Cindy Sherman, Helena Hietanen, Samuel Beckett, and Betty Goodwin–to help us begin to think very differently about illness and human suffering. Taking our lead from Beckett, we regard reason as being given too much responsibility for the work of a caring knowledge, and that it is through the arts that new ideas about (...)
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  44. Mary K. McCurry, Susan M. Hunter Revell & Sr Callista Roy (2010). Knowledge for the Good of the Individual and Society: Linking Philosophy, Disciplinary Goals, Theory, and Practice. Nursing Philosophy 11 (1):42-52.score: 162.0
    Nursing as a profession has a social mandate to contribute to the good of society through knowledge-based practice. Knowledge is built upon theories, and theories, together with their philosophical bases and disciplinary goals, are the guiding frameworks for practice. This article explores a philosophical perspective of nursing's social mandate, the disciplinary goals for the good of the individual and society, and one approach for translating knowledge into practice through the use of a middle-range theory. It is anticipated that the (...)
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  45. Kevin Guise, Karen Kelly, Jennifer Romanowski, Kai Vogeley, Steven M. Platek, Elizabeth Murray & Julian Paul Keenan (2007). The Anatomical and Evolutionary Relationship Between Self-Awareness and Theory of Mind. Human Nature 18 (2):132-142.score: 161.0
    Although theories that examine direct links between behavior and brain remain incomplete, it is known that brain expansion significantly correlates with caloric and oxygen demands. Therefore, one of the principles governing evolutionary cognitive neuroscience is that cognitive abilities that require significant brain function (and/or structural support) must be accompanied by significant fitness benefit to offset the increased metabolic demands. One such capacity is self-awareness (SA), which (1) is found only in the greater apes and (2) remains unclear in terms of (...)
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  46. Norman Gulley (1962/1986). Plato's Theory of Knowledge. Greenwood Press.score: 157.5
    CHAPTER I The Theory of Recollection I. SOCRATIC DOCTRINE IN THE EARLY DIALOGUES In Plato's early dialogues one of the most characteristic and at the same ...
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  47. Lydia Schumacher (2011). Divine Illumination: The History and Future of Augustine's Theory of Knowledge. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 157.5
    Takes an original approach to reading Augustine's theory of divine illumination and shows how the theory was transformed and reinterpreted in medieval ...
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  48. P. Schlenker (2007). The Elimination of Self-Reference: Generalized Yablo-Series and the Theory of Truth. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophical Logic 36 (3):251 - 307.score: 157.5
    Although it was traditionally thought that self-reference is a crucial ingredient of semantic paradoxes, Yablo (1993, 2004) showed that this was not so by displaying an infinite series of sentences none of which is self-referential but which, taken together, are paradoxical. Yablo's paradox consists of a countable series of linearly ordered sentences s(0), s(1), s(2),... , where each s(i) says: For each k > i, s(k) is false (or equivalently: For no k > i is s(k) true). We generalize Yablo's (...)
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  49. Christine M. Giarmo (1997). Are There Commonalties Between Modern and Postmodern Philosophies? An Examination of the Self and Knowledge. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 17 (1):67-78.score: 155.0
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  50. Donald Gotterbarn (1974). A Note on Locke's Theory of Self-Knowledge. Journal of the History of Philosophy 12 (2):239-242.score: 151.5
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