Search results for 'Self-knowledge, Theory of' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Peter Carruthers (2011). The Opacity of Mind: An Integrative Theory of Self-Knowledge. OUP Oxford.score: 1596.0
    It is widely believed that people have privileged and authoritative access to their own thoughts, and many theories have been proposed to explain this supposed fact. The Opacity of Mind challenges the consensus view and subjects the theories in question to critical scrutiny, while showing that they are not protected against the findings of cognitive science by belonging to a separate 'explanatory space'. The book argues that our access to our own thoughts is almost always interpretive, grounded in perceptual awareness (...)
     
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  2. Tillmann Vierkant (2012). Self Knowledge and Knowing Other Minds: The Implicit / Explicit Distinction as a Tool in Understanding Theory of Mind. British Journal of Developmental Psychology 30 (1):141-155.score: 1200.0
    Holding content explicitly requires a form of self knowledge. But what does the relevant self knowledge look like? Using theory of mind as an example, this paper argues that the correct answer to this question will have to take into account the crucial role of language based deliberation, but warns against the standard assumption that explicitness is necessary for ascribing awareness. It argues in line with Bayne that intentional action is at least an equally valid criterion for awareness. This (...)
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  3. Ann Hartle (1996). Self-Knowledge in the Age of Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 1188.0
    Self-Knowledge in the Age of Theory will be of great interest not only to philosophers but to scholars of literature and other humanities.
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  4. Shadi Bartsch (2006). The Mirror of the Self: Sexuality, Self-Knowledge, and the Gaze in the Early Roman Empire. University of Chicago Press.score: 1176.0
    People in the ancient world thought of vision as both an ethical tool and a tactile sense, akin to touch. Gazing upon someone—or oneself—was treated as a path to philosophical self-knowledge, but the question of tactility introduced an erotic element as well. In The Mirror of the Self , Shadi Bartsch asserts that these links among vision, sexuality, and self-knowledge are key to the classical understanding of the self. Weaving together literary theory, philosophy, and social history, Bartsch traces this (...)
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  5. Terence Ball (1980). Dangerous Knowledge? The Self-Subversion of Social Deviance Theory. Inquiry 23 (4):377 – 395.score: 1158.0
    Some sociological theories yield self-subverting or 'dangerous' knowledge. The functionalist theory of social deviance provides a case in point. The theory, first formulated by Durkheim, maintains that ostensibly anti-social deviants perform a number of socially indispensable functions. But what would happen if everyone knew this? They would cease to regard deviants as malefactors and would indeed come to esteem them as public benefactors. In that case, however, deviants could no longer perform their proper function. If they are to (...)
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  6. Peter Carruthers (1996). Simulation and Self-Knowledge: A Defence of the Theory-Theory. In Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.), Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press. 22--38.score: 1064.0
    In this chapter I attempt to curb the pretensions of simulationism. I argue that it is, at best, an epistemological doctrine of limited scope. It may explain how we go about attributing beliefs and desires to others, and perhaps to ourselves, in some cases. But simulation cannot provide the fundamental basis of our conception of, or knowledge of, minded agency.
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  7. Donald Gotterbarn (1974). A Note on Locke's Theory of Self-Knowledge. Journal of the History of Philosophy 12 (2):239-242.score: 1002.0
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  8. Clinton D. Corcoran (1998). Self-Knowledge in the Age of Theory. Review of Metaphysics 51 (3):690-691.score: 1002.0
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  9. J. L. Bermudez (2013). The Opacity of Mind: An Integrative Theory of Self-Knowledge, by Peter Carruthers. Mind 122 (485):263-266.score: 990.0
  10. Aidan McGlynn (2012). The Opacity of Mind: An Integrative Theory of Self-Knowledge. By Peter Carruthers. (Oxford UP, 2011. Pp. 456. Price £30.00.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 62 (248):635-637.score: 990.0
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  11. Maria Serban (2014). The Opacity of Mind: An Integrative Theory of Self-Knowledge. Philosophical Psychology 27 (6):934-938.score: 990.0
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  12. Amy Kind (2013). The Opacity of Mind: An Integrative Theory of Self-Knowledge By Peter Carruthers. [REVIEW] Analysis 74 (1):ant110.score: 990.0
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  13. Eva T. H. Brann (1998). Self-Knowledge in the Age of Theory. New Vico Studies 16:101-104.score: 990.0
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  14. Śaṅkarācārya (2012). Self Knowledge: Adi Shankaracharya's 68 Verse Treatise on the Philosophy of Nondualism: The Absolute Oneness of Ultimate Reality. New Age Books.score: 978.0
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  15. Śaṅkarācārya (1946). Self-Knowledge (Ātmabodha): An English Translation of Śankarāchārya's Ātmabodha with Notes, Comments, and Introduction. Ramakrishna-Vivekananda Center.score: 978.0
     
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  16. Roy Eugene Davis (2012). Self Knowledge: Adi Shankaracharya's 68 Verse Treatise on the Philosophy of Nondualism: The Absolute Oneness of Ultimate Reality. New Age Books.score: 978.0
     
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  17. Garth Green (2010). The Aporia of Inner Sense: The Self-Knowledge of Reason and the Critique of Metaphysics in Kant. Brill.score: 978.0
  18. Genevieve Lloyd (1994). Part of Nature: Self-Knowledge in Spinoza's Ethics. Cornell University Press.score: 978.0
  19. Michael Novak (1965/1986). Belief and Unbelief: A Philosophy of Self-Knowledge: With a New Preface. University Press of America.score: 978.0
  20. Saṅkarācārya (1964). Self-Knowledge (Ātma-Bodha) of Śrí Śaṅkarācārya. Madras, Akhila Bharata Sankara Seva Samiti.score: 978.0
     
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  21. J. F. H. van Rappard (1979). Psychology as Self-Knowledge: The Development of the Concept of the Mind in German Rationalistic Psychology and its Relevance Today. Van Gorcum.score: 978.0
  22. Chris Moore & John Barresi (1993). Knowledge of the Psychological States of Self and Others is Not Only Theory-Laden but Also Data-Driven. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):61.score: 960.0
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  23. Avula Parthasarathy (1971). Atma Bodha (Knowledge of the Self) of Sri Sankaracharya. Bombay,Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan.score: 948.0
     
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  24. Plato (1957/2003). Plato's Theory of Knowledge. Dover Publications.score: 912.0
    Translated by the noted classical scholar Francis M. Cornford, this edition of two masterpieces of Plato's later period features extensive ongoing commentaries by Cornford that provide helpful background information and valuable insights. The Theatetus offers a systematic treatment of the question, "What is knowledge?" with most of the dialogue taking place between Socrates and the student Theatetus. Among the answers they explore: knowledge as perception; knowledge as true belief; knowledge as true belief plus an account (i.e., a justified true belief); (...)
     
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  25. Stanley B. Klein (2013). Klein and Loftus's Model of Trait Self-Knowledge: The Importance of Familiarizing Oneself with the Foundational Research Prior to Reading About its Neuropsychological Applications. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 900.0
    Klein and Loftus's model of trait self-knowledge: the importance of familiarizing oneself with the foundational research prior to reading about its neuropsychological applications.
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  26. Brie Gertler (2011). Self-Knowledge. Routledge.score: 876.0
    The problem of self-knowledge is one of the most fascinating in all of philosophy and has crucial significance for the philosophy of mind and epistemology. Gertler assesses the leading theoretical approaches to self-knowledge, explaining the work of many of the key figures in the field: from Descartes and Kant, through to Bertrand Russell and Gareth Evans, as well as recent work by Tyler Burge, David Chalmers, William Lycan and Sydney Shoemaker. -/- Beginning with an outline of the distinction between self-knowledge (...)
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  27. Cynthia Macdonald (2014). In My ‘Mind’s Eye’: Introspectionism, Detectivism, and the Basis of Authoritative Self-Knowledge. Synthese (15):1-26.score: 876.0
    It is widely accepted that knowledge of certain of one’s own mental states is authoritative in being epistemically more secure than knowledge of the mental states of others, and theories of self-knowledge have largely appealed to one or the other of two sources to explain this special epistemic status. The first, ‘detectivist’, position, appeals to an inner perception-like basis, whereas the second, ‘constitutivist’, one, appeals to the view that the special security awarded to certain self-knowledge is a conceptual matter. I (...)
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  28. R. Greene (2003). Constitutive Theories of Self-Knowledge and the Regress Problem. Philosophical Papers 32 (2):141-48.score: 828.0
    Abstract In the contemporary literature on self-knowledge discussion is framed by and large by two competing models of self-knowledge: the observational (or perceptual) model and the constitutive model. On the observational model self-knowledge is the result of ?cognitively viewing? one's mental states. Constitutive theories of self-knowledge, on the other hand, hold that self-knowledge is constitutive of intentional states. That is, self-ascription is a necessary condition for being in a particular mental state. Akeel Bilgrami is a defender of the constitutive model. (...)
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  29. Brie Gertler, Self-Knowledge. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 804.0
    "Self-knowledge" is commonly used in philosophy to refer to knowledge of one's particular mental states, including one's beliefs, desires, and sensations. It is also sometimes used to refer to knowledge about a persisting self -- its ontological nature, identity conditions, or character traits. At least since Descartes, most philosophers have believed that self-knowledge is importantly different from knowledge of the world external to oneself, including others' thoughts. But there is little agreement about what precisely distinguishes self-knowledge from knowledge in other (...)
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  30. Charles L. Griswold (1986/1996). Self-Knowledge in Plato's Phaedrus. Pennsylvania State University Press.score: 792.0
    In this award-winning study of the Phaedrus, Charles Griswold focuses on the theme of "self-knowledge.
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  31. Anthony E. Hatzimoysis (ed.) (2008). Self-Knowledge. Oxford University Press.score: 792.0
    The essays featured in this collection seek to deepen our understanding of self-knowledge, to solve some of the genuine (and to resolve some of the spurious) ...
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  32. Susan Brower-Toland (2013). Olivi on Consciousness and Self-Knowledge: The Phenomenology, Metaphysics, and Epistemology of Mind's Reflexivity. Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 1.score: 792.0
    The theory of mind that medieval philosophers inherit from Augustine is predicated on the thesis that the human mind is essentially self-reflexive. This paper examines Peter John Olivi's (1248-1298) distinctive development of this traditional Augustinian thesis. The aim of the paper is three-fold. The first is to establish that Olivi's theory of reflexive awareness amounts to a theory of phenomenal consciousness. The second is to show that, despite appearances, Olivi rejects a higher-order analysis of consciousness in favor (...)
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  33. Robert Hanna & Monima Chadha (2011). Non-Conceptualism and the Problem of Perceptual Self-Knowledge. European Journal of Philosophy 19 (2):184-223.score: 780.0
    In this paper we (i) identify the notion of ‘essentially non-conceptual content’ by critically analyzing the recent and contemporary debate about non-conceptual content, (ii) work out the basics of broadly Kantian theory of essentially non-conceptual content in relation to a corresponding theory of conceptual content, and then (iii) demonstrate one effective application of the Kantian theory of essentially non-conceptual content by using this theory to provide a ‘minimalist’ solution to the problem of perceptual self-knowledge which is (...)
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  34. Gunnar Beck (1996). From Kant to Hegel—Johann Gottlieb Fichte's Theory of Self-Consciousness. History of European Ideas 22 (4):275-294.score: 780.0
    This article emphasizes Fichte's role as a central figure in the period of transition from Kantian moral universalism to Hegelian ontological collectivism and _Sittlichkeitsethik. Echoing Rousseau's insights into the sociological determinants of human consciousness and drawing on Herder's more comprehensive theory of the linguistic and cultural conditions of all human thought, Fichte, in his writings from 1796 onward, develops a radical reformulation and extension of Kant's theory of reason and self-consciousness. Fichte's theory of the origins and nature (...)
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  35. Joshua Landy (2004). Philosophy as Fiction: Self, Deception, and Knowledge in Proust. Oxford University Press.score: 778.0
    Philosophy as Fiction seeks to account for the peculiar power of philosophical literature by taking as its case study the paradigmatic generic hybrid of the twentieth century, Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time. At once philosophical--in that it presents claims, and even deploys arguments concerning such traditionally philosophical issues as knowledge, self-deception, selfhood, love, friendship, and art--and literary, in that its situations are imaginary and its stylization inescapably prominent, Proust's novel presents us with a conundrum. How should it be (...)
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  36. Girdhari Lal Chaturvedi (1982). The Concept of Self-Luminosity of Knowledge in Advaita Vedānta. Adarsha Prakashan.score: 774.0
     
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  37. Owen Ware (2009). The Duty of Self-Knowledge. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (3):671-698.score: 768.0
    Kant is well known for claiming that we can never really know our true moral disposition. He is less well known for claiming that the injunction "Know Yourself" is the basis of all self-regarding duties. Taken together, these two claims seem contradictory. My aim in this paper is to show how they can be reconciled. I first address the question of whether the duty of self-knowledge is logically coherent (§1). I then examine some of the practical problems surrounding the duty, (...)
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  38. Albert Newen & Gottfried Vosgerau (2007). A Representational Account of Self-Knowledge. Erkenntnis 67 (2):337 - 353.score: 768.0
    Self-knowledge is knowledge of one’s own states (or processes) in an indexical mode of presentation. The philosophical debate is concentrating on mental states (or processes). If we characterize self-knowledge by natural language sentences, the most adequate utterance has a structure like “I know that I am in mental state M”. This common sense characterization has to be developed into an adequate description. In this investigation we will tackle two questions: (i) What precisely is the phenomenon referred to by “self-knowledge” and (...)
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  39. Stephan Körner (1987). On Brentano's Objections to Kant's Theory of Knowledge. Topoi 6 (1):11-17.score: 768.0
    The main purpose of this essay is to examine Brentano's rejection of Kant's theory of a priori concepts and synthetic a priori judgments. The essay begins by recalling the views of Descartes and Locke about the acquisition of knowledge, since Brentano regards them as on the whole correct or, at least, as pointing in the right direction and since he regards Kant's epistemology as obscurantist and reactionary (Section 1). There follows a brief characterization of Brentano's conception of knowledge as (...)
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  40. Robert F. Bornstein (1999). Unconscious Motivation and Phenomenal Knowledge: Toward a Comprehensive Theory of Implicit Mental States. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):758-758.score: 768.0
    A comprehensive theory of implicit and explicit knowledge must explain phenomenal knowledge (e.g., knowledge regarding one's affective and motivational states), as well as propositional (i.e., “fact”-based) knowledge. Findings from several research areas (i.e., the subliminal mere exposure effect, artificial grammar learning, implicit and self-attributed dependency needs) are used to illustrate the importance of both phenomenal and propositional knowledge for a unified theory of implicit and explicit mental states.
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  41. B. Sodian, C. Hulsken & C. Thoermer (2003). The Self and Action in Theory of Mind Research. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):777-782.score: 768.0
    Research on children's developing theories of mind has contributed to our understanding of the developmental relation of self and action (1) by exploring the relation of the development of self knowledge to the development of knowledge of others' minds and (2) by investigating the relation between theory of mind development and the development of action control. We argue that evidence on theory of mind reasoning in children with deficient action control (ADHD-diagnosed children) is especially relevant to the second (...)
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  42. Jordi Fernández (2013). Transparent Minds: A Study of Self-Knowledge. Oup Oxford.score: 768.0
    How do we know our current states of mind--what we want, and believe in? Jordi Fernández proposes a new theory of self-knowledge, challenging the traditional view that it is a matter of introspection. He argues that we know what we believe and desire by 'looking outward', towards the states of affairs which those beliefs and desires are about.
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  43. Greg P. Hodes (2002). Intentional Structure and the Identity Theory of Knowledge in Bernard Lonergan. International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (4):437-452.score: 768.0
    Bernard Lonergan has argued for a theory of cognition that is transcendentally secure, that is, one such that any plausible attempt to refute it must presuppose its correctness, and one that also grounds a correct metaphysics and ontology. His proposal combines an identity theory of knowledge with an intentional relation between knower and known. It depends in a crucial way upon an appropriation of one’s own cognitional motives and acts, that is, upon “knowing one’s own knowing.” I argue (...)
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  44. David W. Mann (1991). Some Philosophical Directions Towards a Simple Theory of the Self. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 12 (1).score: 768.0
    In the act of self-observation, an individual becomes simultaneously observer and observed, subject and object. While some philosophical psychologists have dismissed thisreflexivity, the present author proposes that it isthe essential feature of the self, making it the basis of a new, conceptually simple, structural and dynamic theory of the self. Drawing from psychopathology, poetry and literature, the author portrays normal and disordered psychological states as disturbances in reflexivity. Qualitative and quantitative variations in this core function are proposed to define (...)
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  45. Dominique Raynaud (2003). Duhem, Quine, Wittgenstein and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge: Continuity of Self-Legitimation? Epistemologia 26 (1):133-160.score: 768.0
    Contemporary sociology of scientific knowledge (SSK) is defined by its relativist trend. Its programme often calls for the support of philosophers, such as Duhem, Quine, and Wittgenstein. A critical rereading of key texts shows that the main principles of relativism are only derivable with difficulty. The thesis of the underdetermination of theory doesn't forbid that Duhem, in many places, validates a correspondence-consistency theory of truth. Thus he never says that social beliefs and interests fill the lack of underdetermination. (...)
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  46. Charles E. Larmore (2010). The Practices of the Self. The University of Chicago Press.score: 762.0
    Sartre as guide -- Bad faith and sincerity -- The example of Stendhal -- Reflection and being like another -- Being natural -- The ubiquity of convention -- Being like another -- Authenticity and the democratic age -- Mimetism and equality -- Being oneself amid conventions -- Authenticity and the nature of the self -- Foundations of a theory of cognitive reflection -- Psychological interpretation -- The structure of cognitive self-reflection -- The self in cognitive reflection -- Representing and (...)
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  47. James Russell (2007). Controlling Core Knowledge: Conditions for the Ascription of Intentional States to Self and Others by Children. Synthese 159 (2):167 - 196.score: 762.0
    The ascription of intentional states to the self involves knowledge, or at least claims to knowledge. Armed with the working definition of knowledge as 'the ability to do things, or refrain from doing things, or believe, or want, or doubt things, for reasons that are facts' [Hyman, J. Philos. Quart. 49:432—451], I sketch a simple competence model of acting and believing from knowledge and when knowledge is defeated by un-experienced changes of state. The model takes the form of three concentric (...)
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  48. Malcolm Ashmore (1989). The Reflexive Thesis: Wrighting Sociology of Scientific Knowledge. University of Chicago Press.score: 756.0
    This unusually innovative book treats reflexivity, not as a philosophical conundrum, but as a practical issue that arises in the course of scholarly research and argument. In order to demonstrate the concrete and consequential nature of reflexivity, Malcolm Ashmore concentrates on an area in which reflexive "problems" are acute: the sociology of scientific knowledge. At the forefront of recent radical changes in our understanding of science, this increasingly influential mode of analysis specializes in rigorous deconstructions of the research practices and (...)
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  49. John Haldane (2007). Introduction to 'Dissolving Hume's Paradox: On Knowledge of Mind and Self' James Frederick Ferrier University of St Andrews (1845–64). [REVIEW] Journal of Scottish Philosophy 5 (1):1-6.score: 750.0
    The following essay, whose title has been provided by me for this occasion, is taken from James Ferrier's work The Institutes of Metaphysic where it appears in Section I., the general theme of which is ‘The Epistemology, or Theory of Knowing’. The essay is a statement and elaboration of the ‘ninth proposition’ of the Institutes, and an examination of its implications as these bear upon knowledge of mind and self. The precise source of the text is the 3rd edition (...)
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  50. Brie Gertler (2003). Introduction to Privileged Access: Philosophical Theories of Self-Knowledge. In , Privileged Access: Philosophical Theories of Self-Knowledge. Ashgate.score: 738.0
     
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