Search results for 'Sense Impression' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Delos D. Wickens, Donald B. Reutener & F. Thomas Eggemeier (1972). Sense Impression as an Encoding Dimension of Words. Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (2):301.score: 150.0
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  2. Willem A. deVries (2006). McDowell, Sellars, and Sense Impressions. European Journal of Philosophy 14 (2):182–201.score: 102.0
  3. Robert C. Richardson & G. Muilenberg (1982). Sellars and Sense Impressions. Erkenntnis 17 (March):171-212.score: 102.0
  4. Wilfrid S. Sellars (1971). Seeing, Sense Impressions, and Sensa: A Reply to Cornman. Review of Metaphysics 24 (March):391-447.score: 102.0
  5. Maurice Charlesworth (1979). Sense-Impressions: A New Model. Mind 88 (January):24-44.score: 102.0
  6. Thomas Natsoulas (2002). The Experiential Presence of Objects to Perceptual Consciousness: Wilfrid Sellars, Sense Impressions, and Perceptual Takings. Journal of Mind and Behavior 23 (3):293-316.score: 102.0
  7. E. E. Dawson (1961). Sense Experience and Physical Objects. Theoria 27 (2):49-57.score: 78.0
  8. Suresh Chandra (1976). Sensible Awareness of Sense-Objects. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 3 (April):355-366.score: 78.0
     
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  9. Wilfrid S. Sellars (1973). Givenness and Explanatory Coherence. Journal of Philosophy 70 (October):612-624.score: 60.0
  10. Godfrey N. A. Vesey (1966). Miss Anscombe on the Intentionality of Sensation. Analysis 26 (March):135-137.score: 60.0
  11. Joseph Levine (1991). Cool Red. Philosophical Psychology 4 (1):27-40.score: 60.0
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  12. Godfrey N. A. Vesey (1964). Armstrong on Bodily Sensations. [REVIEW] Philosophy 39 (April):177-181.score: 60.0
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  13. J. Barry Maund (1976). The Non-Sensuous Epistemic Account of Perception. American Philosophical Quarterly 13 (January):57-62.score: 60.0
  14. John O. Nelson (1964). An Examination of D M Armstrong's Theory of Perception. American Philosophical Quarterly 1 (April):154-160.score: 60.0
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  15. Clement Dore (1965). Seeming to See. American Philosophical Quarterly 2 (October):312-318.score: 60.0
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  16. Michael J. Pendlebury (1987). Perceptual Representation. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 87:91-106.score: 60.0
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  17. Fraser Cowley (1968). A Critique Of British Empiricism. Macmillan.score: 60.0
  18. Hugh R. Wilson (1991). Shadows on the Cave Wall: Philosophy and Visual Science. Philosophical Psychology 4 (1):65-78.score: 60.0
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  19. Paul E. Tibbetts (1972). Feigl on Raw Feels, the Brain, and Knowledge Claims: Some Problems Regarding Theoretical Concepts. Dialectica 26 (3‐4):247-66.score: 60.0
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  20. Manjulekha Bhattacharya (1972). Ernst Mach: Neutral Monism. Studi Internazionali Di Filosofia 4:145-182.score: 60.0
  21. David M. Armstrong (1961). Perception And The Physical World. Humanities Press.score: 60.0
     
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  22. Castaneda Calderon & Hector Neri (eds.) (1966). Intentionality, Minds, And Perception. Detroit: Wayne State University Press.score: 60.0
     
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  23. C. L. Hardin (1991). Reply to Levine's 'Cool Red'. Philosophical Psychology 4:41-50.score: 60.0
     
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  24. Godfrey N. A. Vesey (1971). Perception. Anchor Books.score: 60.0
     
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  25. Irving Thalberg (1965). Looks, Impressions and Incorrigibility. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 25 (March):365-374.score: 54.0
  26. William Hirstein (2011). The Contribution of Prefrontal Executive Processes to Creating a Sense of Self. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):150.score: 54.0
    According to several current theories, executive processes help achieve various mental actions such as remembering, planning and decision-making, by executing cognitive operations on representations held in consciousness. I plan to argue that these executive processes are partly responsible for our sense of self, because of the way they produce the impression of an active, controlling presence in consciousness. If we examine what philosophers have said about the "ego" (Descartes), "the Self" (Locke and Hume), the "self of all selves" (...)
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  27. Moreland Perkins (1971). Sentience. Journal of Philosophy 68 (June):329-37.score: 48.0
  28. P. Thagard & Z. Kunda (1997). Making Sense of People: Coherence Mechanisms. In [Book Chapter].score: 42.0
    When trying to make sense of other people and ourselves, we may rely on several different kinds of cognitive processes. First, we form impressions of other people by integrating information contained in concepts that represent their traits, their behaviors, our stereotypes of the social groups they belong to, and any other information about them that seems relevant. For example, your impression of an acquaintance may be a composite of personality traits (e.g., friendly, independent), behaviors (e.g., told a joke, (...)
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  29. David Beisecker (2005). Phenomenal Consciousness, Sense Impressions, and the Logic of 'What It's Like'. In Ralph D. (Ed) Ellis & Natika (Ed). Newton (eds.), Consciousness & Emotion: Agency, Conscious Choice, and Selective Perception. John Benjamins.score: 36.0
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  30. Jennifer C. Chen, Charles H. Cho & Dennis M. Patten (2013). Initiating Disclosure of Environmental Liability Information: An Empirical Analysis of Firm Choice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics:1-12.score: 36.0
    This paper investigates potential motivations for late adopting U.S. companies to begin disclosing environmental liability amounts in their financial statements. Based on a review of 10-K reports filed from 1998 through 2012, inclusive, we identified 55 firms initiating environmental liability disclosure over the period, with all but three doing so by 2006. Focusing on the disclosers up through 2006, we argue that the companies may have used the disclosure as a tool of impression management to avoid potential stakeholder mis-estimation (...)
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  31. Michael Tye (2007). Intentionalism and the Argument From No Common Content. Noûs 41 (1):589 - 613.score: 30.0
    Disjunctivists (Hinton 1973, Snowdon 1990, Martin 2002, 2006) often motivate their approach to perceptual experience by appealing in part to the claim that in cases of veridical perception, the subject is directly in contact with the perceived object. When I perceive a table, for example, there is no table-like sense-impression that stands as an intermediary between the table and me. Nor am I related to the table as I am to a deer when I see its footprint in (...)
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  32. Craig Callender (1998). The View From No-When. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (1):135 - 159.score: 30.0
    In Philip K. Dick’s Counter-Clock World the direction of time flips in 1986, putting the Earth into what its inhabitants call the ‘Hogarth Phase’. Named after the scientist who predicted that ‘time’s arrow' would change direction, the Hogarth Phase is a period in which entropy decreases instead of increases. During this time the dead call from their graves to be excavated, people clean their lungs by ‘smoking’ stubs that grow into mature cigarettes, coffee separates from cream, and so on. Although (...)
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  33. Carl B. Sachs (2014). Discursive and Somatic Intentionality: Merleau-Ponty Contra 'McDowell or Sellars'. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22 (2):199-227.score: 30.0
    Here I show that Sellars’ radicalization of the Kantian distinction between concepts and intuitions is vulnerable to a challenge grounded in Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology of embodiment. Sellars argues that Kant’s concept of ‘intuition’ is ambiguous between singular demonstrative phrases and sense-impressions. In light of the critique of the Myth of the Given, Sellars argues, in the ‘Myth of Jones’, that sense-impression are theoretical posits. I argue that Merleau-Ponty offers a way of understanding perceptual activity which successfully avoids both (...)
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  34. Gisela Striker (1977). Epicurus on the Truth of Sense Impressions. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 59 (2):125-142.score: 30.0
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  35. Michael Thompson, Roots and Role of Imagination in Kant: Imagination at the Core.score: 30.0
    Kant's critical philosophy promises to overturn both Empiricism and Rationalism by arguing for the necessity of a passive faculty, sensibility, and an active faculty, understanding, in order for cognition to obtain. Kant argues in favor of sense impression found in standard empirical philosophies while advocating conceptual necessities like those found in rational philosophies. It is only in the synthesis of these two elements that cognition and knowledge claims are possible. However, by affirming such a dualism, Kant has created (...)
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  36. H. Von Helmholtz (1971). The Origin and Correct Interpretation of Our Sense Impressions. In Russell Kahl (ed.), Selected Writings of Hermann von Helmholtz. Wesleyan University Press. 501--512.score: 30.0
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  37. Mark Siebel (1999). Truth and Intra-Personal Concept Stability. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):632-633.score: 26.0
    I criticize three claims concerning simulators: (1) That a simulator provides the best-fitting simulation of the perceptual impression one has of an object does not guarantee, pace Barsalou, that the object belongs to the simulator's category. (2) The people described by Barsalou do not acquire a concept of truth because they are not sensitive about the potential inadequacy of their sense impressions. (3) Simulator update prevents Barsalou's way of individuating concepts (i.e., identifying them with simulators) from solving the (...)
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  38. Guy Kahane (2013). Our Cosmic Insignificance. Noûs 47 (2):n/a-n/a.score: 24.0
    The universe that surrounds us is vast, and we are so very small. When we reflect on the vastness of the universe, our humdrum cosmic location, and the inevitable future demise of humanity, our lives can seem utterly insignificant. Many philosophers assume that such worries about our significance reflect a banal metaethical confusion. They dismiss the very idea of cosmic significance. This, I argue, is a mistake. Worries about cosmic insignificance do not express metaethical worries about objectivity or nihilism, and (...)
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  39. Richard Brook, Berkeley and the Causality of Ideas; a Look at PHK 25.score: 24.0
    I argue that Berkeley's distinctive idealism/immaterialism can't support his view that objects of sense, immediately or mediately perceived, are causally inert. (The Passivity of Ideas thesis or PI) Neither appeal to ordinary perception, nor traditional arguments, for example, that causal connections are necessary, and we can't perceive such connections, are helpful. More likely it is theological concerns,e.g., how to have second causes if God upholds by continuously creating the world, that's in the background. This puts Berkeley closer to Malebranche (...)
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  40. Daniel C. Dennett (1993). Review of F. Varela, E. Thompson and E. Rosch, The Embodied Mind. [REVIEW] American Journal of Psychology 106:121-126.score: 24.0
    Cognitive science, as an interdisciplinary school of thought, may have recently moved beyond the bandwagon stage onto the throne of orthodoxy, but it does not make a favorable first impression on many people. Familiar reactions on first encounters range from revulsion to condescending dismissal--very few faces in the crowd light up with the sense of "Aha! So that's how the mind works! Of course!" Cognitive science leaves something out, it seems; moreover, what it apparently leaves out is important, (...)
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  41. Michael Lynch (1991). Pictures of Nothing? Visual Construals in Social Theory. Sociological Theory 9 (1):1-21.score: 24.0
    This paper builds upon ethnomethodological and social constructivist studies of representation in the natural sciences to examine sociological theory, a field that is much closer to home. An analysis of diagrams and related illustrations in theory texts shows that labels, geometric boundaries, vectors, and symmetries often are used to convey a sense of orderly flows of causal influences in a homogeneous field. These graphic elements make up what I call a "rhetorical mathematics" that conveys an impression of rationality. (...)
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  42. William Child (2009). Wittgenstein, Dreaming and Anti-Realism: A Reply to Richard Scheer. Philosophical Investigations 32 (4):329-337.score: 24.0
    I have argued that Wittgenstein's treatment of dreaming involves a kind of anti-realism about the past: what makes "I dreamed p " true is, roughly, that I wake with the feeling or impression of having dreamed p . Richard Scheer raises three objections. First, that the texts do not support my interpretation. Second, that the anti-realist view of dreaming does not make sense, so cannot be Wittgenstein's view. Third, that the anti-realist view leaves it a mystery why someone (...)
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  43. Daniel C. Dennett, Review of Varela, "Review of F. Varela, E. Thompson and E. Rosch, The Embodied Mind ," American Journal of Psychology, 106, 121-6, 1993. [REVIEW]score: 24.0
    Cognitive science, as an interdisciplinary school of thought, may have recently moved beyond the bandwagon stage onto the throne of orthodoxy, but it does not make a favorable first impression on many people. Familiar reactions on first encounters range from revulsion to condescending dismissal--very few faces in the crowd light up with the sense of "Aha! So that's how the mind works! Of course!" Cognitive science leaves something out , it seems; moreover, what it apparently leaves out is (...)
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  44. Dean Rickles, Quantum Gravity: A Primer for Philosophers.score: 24.0
    ‘Quantum Gravity’ does not denote any existing theory: the field of quantum gravity is very much a ‘work in progress’. As you will see in this chapter, there are multiple lines of attack each with the same core goal: to find a theory that unifies, in some sense, general relativity (Einstein’s classical field theory of gravitation) and quantum field theory (the theoretical framework through which we understand the behaviour of particles in non-gravitational fields). Quantum field theory and general relativity (...)
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  45. H. G. Callaway (2009). Review: Pragmata: Festschrift für Klaus Oehler. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 45 (4):pp. 707-711.score: 24.0
    Pragmata: Festschrift für Klaus Oehler Chiefly in German, this handsomely produced volume, occasioned by the 80th birthday of Hamburg philosopher Klaus Oehler, assembles 31 papers, divided among 4 sections, successively devoted to ancient philosophy, semiotics, pragmatism and topics in modernity. One of the papers appears in French, “La philosophie de la musique dans l’ancien stoicisme,” by Evanghelos Moutsopoulos of the University of Athens. The book also contains 5 papers in English, concentrated in the sections on semiotics and pragmatism, including authors (...)
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  46. Daniel Dennett (1993). Review of Varela, E. Thompson and E. Rosch, (Eds. )The Embodied Mind: Cognitive Science and Human Experience. [REVIEW] .score: 24.0
    Cognitive science, as an interdisciplinary school of thought, may have recently moved beyond the bandwagon stage onto the throne of orthodoxy, but it does not make a favorable first impression on many people. Familiar reactions on first encounters range from revulsion to condescending dismissal--very few faces in the crowd light up with the sense of "Aha! So that's how the mind works! Of course!" Cognitive science leaves something out, it seems; moreover, what it apparently leaves out is important, (...)
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  47. Olivier Massin & Marion Hämmerli (2014). Mélanges Chromatiques: la théorie brentanienne des couleurs multiples à la loupe [Chromatic Mixtures: Brentano on Multiple Colors]. In Charles Niveleau (ed.), Vers une philosophie scientifique. Le programme de Brentano. Demopolis.score: 24.0
    Some colors are compound colors, in the sense that they look complex: orange, violet, green..., by contrast to elemental colors like yellow or blue. In the chapter 3 of his Unterschungen zur Sinnespsychologie, Brentano purports to reconcile the claim that some colors are indeed intrinsically composed of others, with the claim that colors are impenetrable with respect to each other. His solution: phenomenal green is like a chessboard of blue and yellow squares. Only, such squares are so small that (...)
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  48. Christian Schäfer (2004). Matter in Plotinus's Normative Ontology. Phronesis 49 (3):266 - 294.score: 24.0
    To most interpreters, the case seems to be clear: Plotinus identifies matter and evil, as he bluntly states in Enn. 1.8[51] that 'last matter' is 'evil', and even 'evil itself'. In this paper, I challenge this view: how and why should Plotinus have thought of matter, the sense-making ἔσχατον of his derivational ontology from the One and Good, evil? A rational reconstruction of Plotinus's tenets should neither accept the paradox that evil comes from Good, nor shirk the arduous task (...)
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  49. Tomoji Shogenji (2013). Coherence of the Contents and the Transmission of Probabilistic Support. Synthese 190 (13):2525-2545.score: 24.0
    This paper examines how coherence of the contents of evidence affects the transmission of probabilistic support from the evidence to the hypothesis. It is argued that coherence of the contents in the sense of the ratio of the positive intersection reduces the transmission of probabilistic support, though this negative impact of coherence may be offset by other aspects of the relations among the contents. It is argued further that there is no broader conception of coherence whose impact on the (...)
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