Search results for 'Senses and sensation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    Daniel Heller-Roazen (2007). The Inner Touch: Archaeology of a Sensation. Distributed by the MIT Press.
    The Inner Touch presents the archaeology of a single sense: the sense of being sentient. Aristotle was perhaps the first to define this faculty when in his treatise On the Soul he identified a sensory power, irreducible to the five senses, by which animals perceive that they are perceiving: the simple "sense," as he wrote, "that we are seeing and hearing." After him, thinkers returned, time and again, to define and redefine this curious sensation. The classical Greek and (...)
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  2. C. E. Emmer (2001). The Senses of the Sublime: Possibilities for a Non-Ocular Sublime in Kant's Critique of Judgment. In Volker Gerhardt, Rolf Horstmann & Ralph Schumacher (eds.), Kant und die Berliner Aufklärung: Akten des IX. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses, Vol. 3. Walter de Gruyter
    It might at first seem that the senses (the five traditionally recognized conduits of outer sense) would have very little to contribute to an investigation of Kant's aesthetics. Is not Kant's aesthetic theory based on a relation of the higher cognitive faculties? Much however can be revealed by asking to what degree sight is essential to aesthetic judgment (of beauty and the sublime) as Kant describes it in the 'Critique of Judgment.' Here the sublime receives particular attention.
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  3.  12
    Davide Panagia (2009). The Political Life of Sensation. Duke University Press.
    Prologue : narratocracy and the contours of political life -- From nomos to nomad : Kant, Deleuze, and Rancière on sensation -- The piazza, the edicola, and the noise of the utterance -- Machiavelli's theory of sensation and Florence's vita festiva -- The viewing subject : Caravaggio, Bacon, and the ring -- "You're eating too fast!" slow food's ethos of convivium -- Epilogue : "the photographs tell it all" : on an ethics of appearance.
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  4.  13
    Diana F. Ackerman (1990). A Natural History of the Senses. Random House.
    A. NATURAL. HISTORY. OF. THE. SENSES. “This is one of the best books of the year—by any measure you want to apply. It is interesting, informative, very well written. This book can be opened on any page and read with relish.... thoroughly  ...
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  5.  33
    Robert Jütte (2005). A History of the Senses: From Antiquity to Cyberspace. Polity.
    This path-breaking book examines our attitudes to the senses from antiquity through to the present day.
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  6.  17
    Brian Massumi (2002). Parables for the Virtual: Movement, Affect, Sensation. Duke University Press.
    Replacing the traditional opposition of literal and figural with new distinctions between stasis and motion and between actual and virtual,Parables for the ...
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  7. Jane Geaney (2002). On the Epistemology of the Senses in Early Chinese Thought. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  8. Jonathan Rée (1999). I See a Voice: Deafness, Language, and the Senses--A Philosophical History. Metropolitan Books, H. Holt and Co..
    A groundbreaking study of deafness, by a philosopher who combines the scientific erudition of Oliver Sacks with the historical flair of Simon Schama. There is nothing more personal than the human voice, traditionally considered the expression of the innermost self. But what of those who have no voice of their own and cannot hear the voices of others? In this tour de force of historical narrative, Jonathan Ree tells the astonishing story of the deaf, from the sixteenth century to the (...)
     
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  9. Raj Thiruvengadam (1996). Sensation Intelligibility in Sensibility. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  10. J. O. Urmson (1968). The Objects of the Five Senses. Oxford University Press.
     
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  11. Shane Butler & Alex C. Purves (eds.) (2013). Synaesthesia and the Ancient Senses. Acumen.
     
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  12.  1
    Donald B. Kuspit (1969). The Philosophical Life of the Senses. New York, Philosophical Library.
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  13. G. E. R. Lloyd & G. E. L. Owen (eds.) (1978). Aristotle on Mind and the Senses: Proceedings of the Seventh Symposium Aristotelicum. Cambridge University Press.
    The Symposia Aristotelica were inaugurated at Oxford in 1957. They are conferences of select groups of Aristotelian scholars from the UK, USA and Europe, and are held every three years. In 1975 the meeting was held in Cambridge and was devoted to Aristotle's psychological treatises, the De anima and the Parva uaturalia. The members of the conference discussed some of the much debated problems of Aristotle's psychology and broached important new topics such as his ideas on imagination. Dr Lloyd and (...)
     
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  14. Jonathan Rée (1999). I See a Voice a Philosophical History of Language, Deafness and the Senses.
     
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  15. Brian L. Keeley (2002). Making Sense of the Senses: Individuating Modalities in Humans and Other Animals. Journal of Philosophy 99 (1):5-28.
    How ought we differentiate the senses? What, say, distinguishes vision from audition? The question comes in two versions. First, there is the traditional problem of individuating the senses in humans. Second, there is also an important question about what sensory modalities we ought to attribute to non-human animals, a version of the question that has been virtually ignored by philosophers. Modality ought to be construed as an “avenue into” an organism for information external to the central nervous system. (...)
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  16.  1
    Daniel Heider (forthcoming). The Notitia Intuitiva_ and _Notitia Abstractiva of the External Senses in Second Scholasticism: Suárez, Poinsot and Francisco de Oviedo. New Content is Available for Vivarium.
    _ Source: _Page Count 31 This paper analyzes the theories of three representatives of Second Scholasticism, namely Francisco Suárez, SJ, John Poinsot, OP, and Francisco de Oviedo, SJ, on the issue of the intuitive and abstractive cognition of the external senses. Based on a comparison of their theories, linked to the historical starting point of the debate in the first decades of the fourteenth century, the paper argues that the doctrinal and argumentative matrix of these authors’ texts is significantly (...)
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  17. Thomas Reid (2007). An Inquiry Into the Human Mind on the Principles of Common Sense. In Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe, Richard McCarty, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Late Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell Pub. Ltd.
    Thomas Reid , the Scottish natural and moral philosopher, was one of the founding members of the Aberdeen Philosophical Society and a significant figure in the Scottish Enlightenment. Reid believed that common sense should form the foundation of all philosophical inquiry. He criticised the sceptical philosophy propagated by his fellow Scot David Hume and the Anglo-Irish bishop George Berkeley, who asserted that the external world did not exist outside the human mind. Reid was also critical of the theory of ideas (...)
     
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  18. Clive Cazeaux (2012). Sensation as Participation in Visual Art. Aesthetic Pathways 2 (2):2-30.
    Can an understanding be formed of how sensory experience might be presented or manipulated in visual art in order to promote a relational concept of the senses, in opposition to the customary, capitalist notion of sensation as a private possession, as a sensory impression that is mine? I ask the question in the light of recent visual art theory and practice which pursue relational, ecological ambitions. As Arnold Berleant, Nicolas Bourriaud, and Grant Kester see it, ecological ambition and (...)
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  19.  8
    Clive Cazeaux, Epistemology and Sensation.
    Sensation is recognized by epistemology as one of the sources of knowledge, alongside memory, testimony, reason, induction and introspection, but this has not always been the case. It is a defining feature of modern epistemology that the senses provide valuable information about the world that cannot be reached through reason alone. However, because the senses can have an intensity and uniqueness that is difficult to describe, it is sometimes not entirely clear what they offer as knowledge, or (...)
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  20.  48
    Pavel Gregoric (2007). Aristotle on the Common Sense. Oxford University Press.
    I. The framework. 1, Aristotle's project and methods. 2, The perceptual capacity of the soul. 3, The sensory apparatus. 4, The common sense and the related capacities -- II. The terminology. 1, Overlooked occurrences of the phrase 'common sense'. 2, De anima III.1 425a27. 3, De partibus animalium IV.10 686a31. 4, De memoria et reminiscentia 1 450a10. 5, De anima III.7 431b5. 6, Conclusions on the terminology -- III. Functions of the common sense. 1, Simultaneous perception and cross-modal binding. 2, (...)
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  21.  8
    Magni Martens & Finn Tschudi (2010). Multivariate Psychophysics, Multivariate Data: Human Senses and Their Measurement. Biological Theory 5 (4):337-343.
    We reflect upon quantification in biology in two ways. First, from a sensory scientific perspective, we address theories and methods for studying sensation, perception, and cognition. Sensory science concerns action of the human senses, which are not passive receivers but operate in an active and fundamental way for human beings in various social and environmental contexts. In the past one could only handle one-to-one relationships within a univariate framework. Today we have tools to capture complexity closer to real (...)
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  22. Daniel Heller-Roazen (2009). The Inner Touch: Archaeology of a Sensation. Zone Books.
    The Inner Touch presents the archaeology of a single sense: the sense of being sentient. Aristotle was perhaps the first to define this faculty when in his treatise On the Soul he identified a sensory power, irreducible to the five senses, by which animals perceive that they are perceiving: the simple "sense," as he wrote, "that we are seeing and hearing." After him, thinkers returned, time and again, to define and redefine this curious sensation. The classical Greek and (...)
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  23. Tim Jankowiak & Eric Watkins (2014). Meat on the Bones: Kant's Account of Cognition in the Anthropology Lectures. In Alix Cohen (ed.), Kant's Lectures on Anthropology: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press 57-75.
    This chapter describes Immanuel Kant's conception of anthropology and the most basic distinctions he draws when invoking faculties throughout the anthropology transcripts. It explains Kant's account of the objective senses (hearing, sight, and touch), and shows that the sensory material provided by these senses are empirical conditions of experience that supplement the a priori conditions articulated in the Critique of Pure Reason. The chapter also describes some of the central details of Kant's account of the imagination, focusing on (...)
     
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  24.  12
    Joseph M. Magee (2003). Unmixing the Intellect: Aristotle on the Cognitive Powers and Bodily Organs. Greenwood Press.
  25.  6
    Stefano Martini (2011). Il Senso Dell'udito Nel Corpus Aristotelicum. Peter Lang.
    The research that I have carried out on the sense of hearing in the Aristotelian ambit is based on a personal interest in the medical aspects that can be found in the treaties of the Stagirite. If, on the one hand, there has always been very deep attention by the scholars to the phenomenon of perception, and still there is, on the other hand, although not ignored, hearing remains perhaps somewhat neglected or, however, not sufficiently investigated so far, despite its (...)
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  26. James I. Porter (2010). The Origins of Aesthetic Thought in Ancient Greece: Matter, Sensation, and Experience. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first modern attempt to put aesthetics back on the map in classical studies. James I. Porter traces the origins of aesthetic thought and inquiry in their broadest manifestations as they evolved from before Homer down to the fourth century and then into later antiquity, with an emphasis on Greece in its earlier phases. Greek aesthetics, he argues, originated in an attention to the senses and to matter as opposed to the formalism and idealism that were enshrined (...)
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  27. James I. Porter (2016). The Origins of Aesthetic Thought in Ancient Greece: Matter, Sensation, and Experience. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first modern attempt to put aesthetics back on the map in classical studies. James I. Porter traces the origins of aesthetic thought and inquiry in their broadest manifestations as they evolved from before Homer down to the fourth century and then into later antiquity, with an emphasis on Greece in its earlier phases. Greek aesthetics, he argues, originated in an attention to the senses and to matter as opposed to the formalism and idealism that were enshrined (...)
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  28.  13
    Roel Sterckx (2011). Food, Sacrifice, and Sagehood in Early China. Cambridge University Press.
    Customs and cuisine -- Cooking the world -- Sacrifice and sense -- The economics of sacrifice -- Sages, spirits, and senses.
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  29. Finn Tschudi & Magni Martens (2010). Multivariate Psychophysics, Multivariate Data: Human Senses and Their Measurement. Biological Theory 5 (4):337-343.
    We reflect upon quantification in biology in two ways. First, from a sensory scientific perspective, we address theories and methods for studying sensation, perception, and cognition. Sensory science concerns action of the human senses, which are not passive receivers but operate in an active and fundamental way for human beings in various social and environmental contexts. In the past one could only handle one-to-one relationships within a univariate framework. Today we have tools to capture complexity closer to real (...)
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  30.  55
    Austen Clark (1992). Sensory Qualities. Clarendon.
    Drawing on work in psychophysics, psychometrics, and sensory neurophysiology, Clark analyzes the character and defends the integrity of psychophysical explanations of qualitative facts, arguing that the structure of such explanations is sound and potentially successful.
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  31.  28
    N. Humphrey (1992). A History of the Mind: Evolution and the Birth of Consciousness. Simon and Schuster.
    This book is a tour-de-force on how human consciousness may have evolved. From the "phantom pain" experienced by people who have lost their limbs to the uncanny faculty of "blindsight," Humphrey argues that raw sensations are central to all conscious states and that consciousness must have evolved, just like all other mental faculties, over time from our ancestorsodily responses to pain and pleasure. '.
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  32. William P. Alston (1993). The Reliability of Sense Perception. Cornell University Press.
    Chapter INTRODUCTION i. The Problem Why suppose that sense perception is, by and large, an accurate source of information about the physical environment? ...
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  33. Thomas Reid & Derek R. Brookes (1997). An Inquiry Into the Human Mind on the Principles of Common Sense : A Critical Edition. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  34.  35
    Alan Millar (1991). Reasons and Experience. Oxford University Press.
    Millar argues against the tendency in current philosophical thought to treat sensory experiences as a peculiar species of propositional attitude. While allowing that experiences may in some sense bear propositional content, he presents a view of sensory experiences as a species of psychological state. A key theme in his general approach is that justified belief results from the competent exercise of conceptual capacities, some of which involve an ability to respond appropriately to current experience. In working out this approach the (...)
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  35.  11
    Thomas Reid (1764). An Inquiry Into the Human Mind on the Principles of Common Sense. A. Millar, and A. Kincaid & J. Bell.
    On the Principles of Common Sense Thomas Reid. SECT. IX. Tltat there is a principle in human nature, from which the notion of this, as well as all other natural virtues or causes, is derived. In order to illustrate further how we come to conceive ...
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  36.  23
    Thomas Reid (1813). An Inquiry Into the Human Mind. Chicago,University of Chicago Press.
  37.  49
    I. M. Crombie (1962). An Examination of Plato's Doctrines. New York, Humanities Press.
    ... all probability, Plato's own statement; made indeed to be read by friends in Syracuse in explanation of the role he had played ...
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  38.  15
    Maurice Mandelbaum (1964). Philosophy, Science, and Sense Perception: Historical and Critical Studies. Baltimore, Johns Hopkins Press.
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  39.  25
    T. K. Johansen (1997). Aristotle on the Sense-Organs. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a detailed study of Aristotle's theory of the sense organs.
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  40. Thomas Reid (1997). Thomas Reid, an Inquiry Into the Human Mind: On the Principles of Common Sense. Pennsylvania State University Press.
  41.  3
    A. E. Pitson & Charles Landesman (1995). The Eye and the Mind. Reflections on Perception and the Problem of Knowledge. Philosophical Quarterly 45 (179):245.
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  42.  1
    E. Hershey Sneath (1892). The Philosophy of Reid, as Contained in the "Inquiry Into the Human Mind on the Principles of Common Sense.". Philosophical Review 1 (4):448-450.
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  43. Grant Allen (1877). Physiological Aesthetics. Garland Pub..
     
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  44. Alexander (2000). On Aristotle's "on Sense Perception". Cornell University Press.
  45. Aristotle (1906). De Sensu and De Memoria. New York,Arno Press.
  46. Roger Bacon & Robert Steele (1937). Liber de Sensu Et Sensato ; Summa de Sophismatibus Et Distinctionibus. E Typographeo Clarendoniano.
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  47.  14
    H. Baltussen (2000). Theophrastus Against the Presocratics and Plato: Peripatetic Dialectic in the De Sensibus. Brill.
    This study offers a new and stimulating interpretation of Theophrastus' "De sensibus, a treatise unique in content and method, as it reports and criticizes the ...
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  48.  1
    Shahidha K. Bari (2012). Keats and Philosophy: The Life of Sensations. Routledge.
    Using Keats as a particular case, this book also demonstrates the ways in which theory and philosophy supplement literary scholarship.
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  49. Thomas Bénatouïl & Isabelle Draelants (eds.) (2011). Expertus Sum: L'Expérience Par les Sens Dans la Philosophie Naturelle Médiévale: Actes du Colloque International de Pont-à-Mousson, 5-7 Février 2009. [REVIEW] Sismel Edizioni Del Galluzzo.
  50. George Bondor (ed.) (2011). Sensuri Ale Corpului: Actele Celui de-Al 2-Lea Colocviu Al Centrului de Hermeneutică, Fenomologie Și Filosofie Practică, 28-29 Octombrie 2010, Universitatea "A.I. Cuza" Din Iași, Facultatea de Filosofie Și Științe Social-Politice, Iași, România. [REVIEW] Editura Universității "Alexandru Ioan Cuza".
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