Search results for 'Senses and sensation History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  33
    Robert Jütte (2005). A History of the Senses: From Antiquity to Cyberspace. Polity.
    This path-breaking book examines our attitudes to the senses from antiquity through to the present day.
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  2. Jonathan Rée (1999). I See a Voice: Deafness, Language, and the Senses--A Philosophical History. Metropolitan Books, H. Holt and Co..
    A groundbreaking study of deafness, by a philosopher who combines the scientific erudition of Oliver Sacks with the historical flair of Simon Schama. There is nothing more personal than the human voice, traditionally considered the expression of the innermost self. But what of those who have no voice of their own and cannot hear the voices of others? In this tour de force of historical narrative, Jonathan Ree tells the astonishing story of the deaf, from the sixteenth century to the (...)
     
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  3.  11
    Diana F. Ackerman (1990). A Natural History of the Senses. Random House.
    A. NATURAL. HISTORY. OF. THE. SENSES. “This is one of the best books of the year—by any measure you want to apply. It is interesting, informative, very well written. This book can be opened on any page and read with relish.... thoroughly  ...
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  4. Jonathan Rée (1999). I See a Voice a Philosophical History of Language, Deafness and the Senses.
     
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  5.  28
    N. Humphrey (1992/1999). A History of the Mind: Evolution and the Birth of Consciousness. Simon and Schuster.
    This book is a tour-de-force on how human consciousness may have evolved. From the "phantom pain" experienced by people who have lost their limbs to the uncanny faculty of "blindsight," Humphrey argues that raw sensations are central to all conscious states and that consciousness must have evolved, just like all other mental faculties, over time from our ancestorsodily responses to pain and pleasure. '.
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  6. Shane Butler & Alex C. Purves (eds.) (2013). Synaesthesia and the Ancient Senses. Acumen.
     
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  7.  1
    Daniel Heller-Roazen (2007). The Inner Touch: Archaeology of a Sensation. Distributed by the MIT Press.
    The Inner Touch presents the archaeology of a single sense: the sense of being sentient. Aristotle was perhaps the first to define this faculty when in his treatise On the Soul he identified a sensory power, irreducible to the five senses, by which animals perceive that they are perceiving: the simple "sense," as he wrote, "that we are seeing and hearing." After him, thinkers returned, time and again, to define and redefine this curious sensation. The classical Greek and (...)
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  8.  12
    Joseph M. Magee (2003). Unmixing the Intellect: Aristotle on the Cognitive Powers and Bodily Organs. Greenwood Press.
  9.  13
    Roel Sterckx (2011). Food, Sacrifice, and Sagehood in Early China. Cambridge University Press.
    Customs and cuisine -- Cooking the world -- Sacrifice and sense -- The economics of sacrifice -- Sages, spirits, and senses.
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  10.  24
    T. K. Johansen (1997). Aristotle on the Sense-Organs. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a detailed study of Aristotle's theory of the sense organs.
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  11.  31
    Martinich (2009). Four Senses of 'Meaning' in the History of Ideas: Quentin Skinner's Theory of Historical Interpretation. Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (3):225-245.
    At least four different senses of 'meaning' need to be kept separate when describing the proper way to do the history of ideas. The first sense, communicative meaning, relies on the communicative intentions of the author and is very close to H. P. Grice's 'nonnatural meaning'. The second sense, meaning as significance or importance, is close to Grice's "natural meaning," but I focus on a type that depends on human interests; in this sense, meaning as significance is always (...)
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  12.  3
    Arthur Norman Foxe (1962). The Common Sense Form Heraclitus to Peirce. New York, Turnbridge Press.
  13.  17
    Robert Schwartz (ed.) (2004). Perception. Malden MA: Blackwell Publishing.
    This text presents essays on the conceptual and theoretical problems in the study of vision.
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  14.  31
    Koray Karaca (2013). The Strong and Weak Senses of Theory-Ladenness of Experimentation: Theory-Driven Versus Exploratory Experiments in the History of High-Energy Particle Physics. Science in Context 26 (1):93-136.
    In the theory-dominated view of scientific experimentation, all relations of theory and experiment are taken on a par; namely, that experiments are performed solely to ascertain the conclusions of scientific theories. As a result, different aspects of experimentation and of the relation of theory to experiment remain undifferentiated. This in turn fosters a notion of theory-ladenness of experimentation that is too coarse-grained to accurately describe the relations of theory and experiment in scientific practice. By contrast, in this article, I suggest (...)
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  15. James A. Secord & John M. Lynch (2001). Victorian Sensation: The Extraordinary Publication, Reception, and Secret Authorship of "Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation". Journal of the History of Biology 34 (3):565-579.
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  16.  5
    Edwin G. Boring (1944). Sensation and Perception in the History of Experimental Psychology. Journal of Philosophy 41 (12):334-335.
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  17.  8
    Clive Cazeaux, Epistemology and Sensation.
    Sensation is recognized by epistemology as one of the sources of knowledge, alongside memory, testimony, reason, induction and introspection, but this has not always been the case. It is a defining feature of modern epistemology that the senses provide valuable information about the world that cannot be reached through reason alone. However, because the senses can have an intensity and uniqueness that is difficult to describe, it is sometimes not entirely clear what they offer as knowledge, or (...)
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  18. Daniel Heller-Roazen (2009). The Inner Touch: Archaeology of a Sensation. Zone Books.
    The Inner Touch presents the archaeology of a single sense: the sense of being sentient. Aristotle was perhaps the first to define this faculty when in his treatise On the Soul he identified a sensory power, irreducible to the five senses, by which animals perceive that they are perceiving: the simple "sense," as he wrote, "that we are seeing and hearing." After him, thinkers returned, time and again, to define and redefine this curious sensation. The classical Greek and (...)
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  19. G. E. R. Lloyd & G. E. L. Owen (eds.) (1978). Aristotle on Mind and the Senses: Proceedings of the Seventh Symposium Aristotelicum. Cambridge University Press.
    The Symposia Aristotelica were inaugurated at Oxford in 1957. They are conferences of select groups of Aristotelian scholars from the UK, USA and Europe, and are held every three years. In 1975 the meeting was held in Cambridge and was devoted to Aristotle's psychological treatises, the De anima and the Parva uaturalia. The members of the conference discussed some of the much debated problems of Aristotle's psychology and broached important new topics such as his ideas on imagination. Dr Lloyd and (...)
     
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  20.  10
    C. A. V. (1944). Sensation and Perception in the History of Experimental Psychology. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 41 (12):334-335.
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  21.  1
    L. E. Thomas & D. W. Hamlyn (1962). Sensation and Perception: A History of the Philosophy of Perception. Philosophical Quarterly 12 (49):372.
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  22.  15
    Christopher Shields (1992). John J. Cleary: Aristotle on the Many Senses of Priority. (Journal of the History of Philosophy, Monograph Series.) Pp. Xiv + 131. Carbondale, Illinois: Southern Illinois University Press, 1988. Paper, $15.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 42 (01):209-210.
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  23.  2
    John O'neill (1976). On the History of the Human Senses in Vico and Marx. Social Research 43.
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  24.  1
    H. K. R. (1962). Sensation and Perception: A History of the Philosophy of Perception. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 15 (3):525-525.
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  25. Ades Ades (1943). Boring's Sensation and Perception in the History of Experimental Psychology. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 4:104.
     
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  26. W. H. F. Barnes (1962). HAMLYN, D. W. - "Sensation and Perception". A History of the Philosophy of Perception. [REVIEW] Mind 71:574.
     
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  27. Koray Karaca (2013). The Strong and Weak Senses of Theory-Ladenness of Experimentation: Theory-Driven Versus Exploratory Experiments in the History of High-Energy Particle Physics – ERRATUM. Science in Context 26 (4):665-666.
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  28. Brian L. Keeley (2009). The Early History of the Quale and Its Relation to the Senses. In John Symons & Paco Calvo (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Psychology. Routledge
     
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  29. F. Murphy (1999). Jonathan Ree, I See a Voice: A Philosophical History of Language, Deafness and the Senses. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 7 (3):426.
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  30. Alan R. White (1961). Sensation and Perception: A History of the Philosophy of Perception. Philosophical Books 2 (4):13-14.
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  31. C. E. Emmer (2001). The Senses of the Sublime: Possibilities for a Non-Ocular Sublime in Kant's Critique of Judgment. In Volker Gerhardt, Rolf Horstmann & Ralph Schumacher (eds.), Kant und die Berliner Aufklärung: Akten des IX. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses, Vol. 3. Walter de Gruyter
    It might at first seem that the senses (the five traditionally recognized conduits of outer sense) would have very little to contribute to an investigation of Kant's aesthetics. Is not Kant's aesthetic theory based on a relation of the higher cognitive faculties? Much however can be revealed by asking to what degree sight is essential to aesthetic judgment (of beauty and the sublime) as Kant describes it in the 'Critique of Judgment.' Here the sublime receives particular attention.
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  32.  12
    Brian Massumi (2002). Parables for the Virtual: Movement, Affect, Sensation. Duke University Press.
    Replacing the traditional opposition of literal and figural with new distinctions between stasis and motion and between actual and virtual,Parables for the ...
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  33.  12
    Davide Panagia (2009). The Political Life of Sensation. Duke University Press.
    Prologue : narratocracy and the contours of political life -- From nomos to nomad : Kant, Deleuze, and Rancière on sensation -- The piazza, the edicola, and the noise of the utterance -- Machiavelli's theory of sensation and Florence's vita festiva -- The viewing subject : Caravaggio, Bacon, and the ring -- "You're eating too fast!" slow food's ethos of convivium -- Epilogue : "the photographs tell it all" : on an ethics of appearance.
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  34. John McCumber (2013). Understanding Hegel's Mature Critique of Kant. Stanford University Press.
    Hegel's critique of Kant was a turning point in the history of philosophy: for the first time, the concrete, situated, and in certain senses "naturalistic" style pioneered by Hegel confronted the thin, universalistic, and argumentatively purified style of philosophy that had found its most rigorous expression in Kant. The controversy has hardly died away: it virtually haunts contemporary philosophy from epistemology to ethical theory. Yet if this book is right, the full import of Hegel's critique of Kant has (...)
     
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  35.  62
    Stephen Zepke (2011). The Sublime Conditions of Contemporary Art. Deleuze Studies 5 (1):73-83.
    Deleuze's relationship to Kant is intricate and fundamental, given that Deleuze develops his transcendental philosophy of difference in large part out of Kant's work. In doing so he utilises the moment of the sublime from the third Critique as the genetic model for the irruption of the faculties beyond their capture within common sense. In this sense, the sublime offers the model not only for transcendental genesis but also for aesthetic experience unleashed from any conditions of possibility. As a result, (...)
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  36.  7
    Nick Skiadopoulos & Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2011). Greek Returns: The Poetry of Nikos Karouzos. Continent 1 (3):201-207.
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 201-207. “Poetry is experience, linked to a vital approach, to a movement which is accomplished in the serious, purposeful course of life. In order to write a single line, one must have exhausted life.” —Maurice Blanchot (1982, 89) Nikos Karouzos had a communist teacher for a father and an orthodox priest for a grandfather. From his four years up to his high school graduation he was incessantly educated, reading the entire private library of his granddad, comprising mainly (...)
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  37.  4
    Nick Skiadopoulos & Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2011). Greek Returns: The Poetry of Nikos Karouzos. Continent 1 (3):201-207.
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 201-207. “Poetry is experience, linked to a vital approach, to a movement which is accomplished in the serious, purposeful course of life. In order to write a single line, one must have exhausted life.” —Maurice Blanchot (1982, 89) Nikos Karouzos had a communist teacher for a father and an orthodox priest for a grandfather. From his four years up to his high school graduation he was incessantly educated, reading the entire private library of his granddad, comprising mainly (...)
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  38.  16
    David J. Murray (1993). A Perspective for Viewing the History of Psychophysics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):115.
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  39. Jane Geaney (2002). On the Epistemology of the Senses in Early Chinese Thought. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  40.  18
    Ian G. Stewart (2012). Res, Veluti Per Machinas, Conficiatur: Natural History and the'Mechanical'Reform of Natural Philosophy. Early Science and Medicine 17 (1-2):1-2.
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  41. Raj Thiruvengadam (1996). Sensation Intelligibility in Sensibility. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  42. J. O. Urmson (1968). The Objects of the Five Senses. Oxford University Press.
     
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  43.  1
    Donald B. Kuspit (1969). The Philosophical Life of the Senses. New York, Philosophical Library.
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  44. Mohan Matthen (2015). Introduction to Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Perception. In Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Perception. Oxford University Press 1-25.
    Perception is the ultimate source of our knowledge about contingent facts. It is an extremely important philosophical development that starting in the last quarter of the twentieth century, philosophers have begun to change how they think of perception. The traditional view of perception focussed on sensory receptors; it has become clear, however, that perceptual systems radically transform the output of these receptors, yielding content concerning objects and events in the external world. Adequate understanding of this process requires (...)
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  45.  15
    Adrian Jones (2011). Historys So It Seems: Heidegger-Ian Phenomenologies and History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (1):1-35.
    This article entitled “History's `So it seems'” explores the potential of phenomenology for the framing of histories which privilege partcipant perspectives. The theory agenda of the article adapts insights drawn from Heidegger's ontological hermeneutic of Da-sein - the human condition of being-there and being-aware (or not aware). The theory agenda also adapts Heidegger's readings of Heraclitus. The practical agenda of the article illustrates this potential of Heidegger's phenomenology for history by contrasting `so it once seemed' senses of (...)
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  46.  2
    Alon Confino (2009). 1. Narrative Form and Historical Sensation: On Saul Friedländer's the Years of Extermination1. History and Theory 48 (3):199-219.
    wide as an exemplary work of history. Yet it was written by a historian who in the last two decades has strenuously asserted the limits of Holocaust representation. At the center of this essay is a problem of historical writing: how to write a historical narrative of the Holocaust that both offers explanations of the unfolding events and also suggests that the most powerful sensation about those events, at the time and since, is that they are beyond words. (...)
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  47. Brian L. Keeley (2002). Making Sense of the Senses: Individuating Modalities in Humans and Other Animals. Journal of Philosophy 99 (1):5-28.
    How ought we differentiate the senses? What, say, distinguishes vision from audition? The question comes in two versions. First, there is the traditional problem of individuating the senses in humans. Second, there is also an important question about what sensory modalities we ought to attribute to non-human animals, a version of the question that has been virtually ignored by philosophers. Modality ought to be construed as an “avenue into” an organism for information external to the central nervous system. (...)
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  48. John Corcoran (2006). Schemata: The Concept of Schema in the History of Logic. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 12 (2):219-240.
    The syllogistic figures and moods can be taken to be argument schemata as can the rules of the Stoic propositional logic. Sentence schemata have been used in axiomatizations of logic only since the landmark 1927 von Neumann paper [31]. Modern philosophers know the role of schemata in explications of the semantic conception of truth through Tarski’s 1933 Convention T [42]. Mathematical logicians recognize the role of schemata in first-order number theory where Peano’s second-order Induction Axiom is approximated by Herbrand’s Induction-Axiom (...)
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  49.  22
    Andrew J. Mitchell (2013). The Coming of History: Heidegger and Nietzsche Against the Present. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 46 (3):395-411.
    Heidegger’s 1938–1939 seminar on Nietzsche ’s On the Utility and Liability of History for Life continues Heidegger’s grand interpretation of Nietzsche as a metaphysical thinker of presence. Nietzsche ’s conceptions forgetting, memory, and even life itself, according to Heidegger, are all complicit in the privileging of presence. Simultaneous with his seminar, Heidegger is also compiling the notebook, Die Geschichte des Seyns, 1938–1940, wherein he sketches his own conception of history. Examining (...)’s criticisms of Nietzsche in the light of his contemporaneous notebook allows us to articulate Heidegger’s concern for history and for “what has-been” as a thinking of the “coming” of being. For Heidegger, to exist historically is to exist as something sent, something arriving, as something that “comes” to us. This coming of history is an ontological determination of all that is, no longer construed as present-at-hand objects, but as always arriving, relational beings. After presenting Heidegger’s view of the coming of history, I return to Nietzsche ’s Utility and Liability of History to draw attention to an aspect of his text that is neglected by Heidegger, that of the political. The concluding sections of Nietzsche ’s text confront the politics of the present, in both senses of the genitive, in order to rally against the closure of society. In the conclusion to the paper, I turn to the political dimension of Nietzsche ’s thinking of history with an eye to how it might elude Heidegger’s interpretation. (shrink)
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  50.  6
    F. H. Bradley (1935/1968). The Presuppositions of Critical History. Chicago, Quadrangle Books.
    This work combines two early pamphlets by F. H. Bradley , the foremost philosopher of the British Idealist movement. The first essay, published in 1874, deals with the nature of professional history, and foreshadows some of Bradley's later ideas in metaphysics. He argues that history cannot be subjected to scientific scrutiny because it is not directly available to the senses, meaning that all history writing is inevitably subjective. Though not widely discussed at the time of publication, (...)
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