Search results for 'Sensory Feedback*' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Felicia Pei-Hsin Cheng, Michael Grossbach & Eckart Altenmüller (2013). Altered Sensory Feedbacks in Pianist's Dystonia: The Altered Auditory Feedback Paradigm and the Glove Effect. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:868.score: 174.0
    Background: This study investigates the effect of altered auditory feedback (AAF) in musician's dystonia (MD) and discusses whether altered auditory feedback can be considered as a sensory trick in MD. Furthermore, the effect of AAF is compared with altered tactile feedback, which can serve as a sensory trick in several other forms of focal dystonia. Methods: The method is based on scale analysis (Jabusch et al. 2004). Experiment 1 employs synchronization paradigm: 12 MD patients and 25 healthy pianists (...)
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  2. Takuya Honda, Nobuhiro Hagura, Toshinori Yoshioka & Hiroshi Imamizu (2013). Imposed Visual Feedback Delay of an Action Changes Mass Perception Based on the Sensory Prediction Error. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 114.0
    While performing an action, the timing of when the sensory feedback is given can be used to establish the causal link between the action and its consequence. It has been shown that delaying the visual feedback while carrying an object makes people feel the mass of the object to be greater, suggesting that the feedback timing can also impact the perceived quality of an external object. In this study, we investigated the origin of the feedback timing information that influences (...)
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  3. Daichi Nozaki Takuya Honda, Masaya Hirashima (2012). Habituation to Feedback Delay Restores Degraded Visuomotor Adaptation by Altering Both Sensory Prediction Error and the Sensitivity of Adaptation to the Error. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 114.0
    Sensory prediction error, which is the difference between actual and predicted sensory consequences, is a driving force of motor learning. Thus, appropriate temporal associations between the actual sensory feedback signals and motor commands for predicting sensory consequences are crucial for the brain to calculate the sensory prediction error accurately. Indeed, it has been shown that artificially introduced delays in visual feedback degrade motor learning. However, our previous study has showed that degraded adaptation is alleviated by (...)
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  4. P. E. Roland (1978). Sensory Feedback to the Cerebral Cortex During Voluntary Movement in Man. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):129.score: 102.0
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  5. John Gyr, Richmond Willey & Adele Henry (1979). Motor-Sensory Feedback and Geometry of Visual Space: An Attempted Replication. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):59-64.score: 102.0
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  6. Bruce Bridgeman (2008). The Role of Motor-Sensory Feedback in the Evolution of Mind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):132-133.score: 96.0
    Seemingly small changes in brain organization can have revolutionary consequences for function. An example is evolution's application of the primate action-planning mechanism to the management of communicative sequences. When feedback from utterances reaches the brain again through a mechanism that evolved to monitor action sequences, it makes another pass through the brain, amplifying the human power of thinking.
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  7. Lei Wang, Christine Sutter, Ronald Josef Zvonimir Dangel, Jochen Musseler & Catherine Disselhorst-Klug (2012). Perceiving One's Own Limb Movements with Conflicting Sensory Feedback: The Role of Mode of Movement Control and Age. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 96.0
    Previous studies have demonstrated a great uncertainty in evaluating one's own voluntary actions when visual feedback is suspended. We now compare these limitations in younger and older adults during active or passive limb movements. Participants put their dominant hand on a robot arm and performed movements actively or the relaxed limb was moved passively. Either a distorted visual feedback or no visual feedback at all was provided during the movement. Perception of limb movements was attenuated through visual feedback. This effect (...)
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  8. Wayne L. Shebilske (1978). Sensory Feedback During Eye Movements Reconsidered. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):160.score: 90.0
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  9. J. A. Scott Kelso (1979). Motor-Sensory Feedback Formulations: Are We Asking the Right Questions? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):72-73.score: 90.0
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  10. Hans Wallach (1979). Three Functions of Motor-Sensory Feedback in Object Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):84-85.score: 90.0
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  11. J. Dickinson (1978). The Function of Sensory Feedback. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):148.score: 90.0
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  12. Joseph R. Higgins & Ronald W. Angle (1970). Correction of Tracking Errors Without Sensory Feedback. Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (3):412.score: 90.0
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  13. Srikantan S. Nagarajan John F. Houde (2011). Speech Production as State Feedback Control. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 84.0
    Spoken language exists because of a remarkable neural process. Inside a speaker’s brain, an intended message gives rise to neural signals activating the muscles of the vocal tract. The process is remarkable because these muscles are activated in just the right way that the vocal tract produces sounds a listener understands as the intended message. What is the best approach to understanding the neural substrate of this crucial motor control process? One of the key recent modeling developments in neuroscience has (...)
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  14. Sukhvinder S. Obhi (2007). Evidence for Feedback Dependent Conscious Awareness of Action. Brain Research 1161:88-94.score: 78.0
  15. Dh Warren & Er Strelow (1986). The Role of Feedback in Sensory Aid Learning. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 24 (5):353-353.score: 72.0
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  16. Simon Clavagnier, Arnaud Falchier & Henry Kennedy (2004). Long-Distance Feedback Projections to Area V1: Implications for Multisensory Integration, Spatial Awareness, and Visual Consciousness. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience. Special Issue 4 (2):117-126.score: 66.0
  17. David Suarez, Diana Acosta Navas, Umut Baysan & Kevin Connolly (forthcoming). Sensory Substitution and Non-Sensory Feelings. In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), Sensory Substitution and Augmentation. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    One of the central limitations of sensory substitution devices (SSDs) is their inability to reproduce the non-sensory feelings that are normally associated with visual experiences, especially hedonic and aesthetic responses. This limitation is sometimes reported to cause SSD users frustration. To make matters worse, it is unclear that improvements in acuity, bandwidth, or training will resolve the issue. Yet, if SSDs are to actually reproduce visual experience in its fullness, it seems that the reproduction of non-sensory feelings (...)
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  18. Matthew Brown & Derek Besner (2002). Semantic Priming: On the Role of Awareness in Visual Word Recognition in the Absence of an Expectancy. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):402-422.score: 60.0
  19. Waka Fujisaki (2012). Effects of Delayed Visual Feedback on Grooved Pegboard Test Performance. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 60.0
    Using four experiments, this study investigates what amount of delay brings about maximal impairment under delayed visual feedback and whether a critical interval, such as that in audition, also exists in vision. The first experiment measured the Grooved Pegboard test performance as a function of visual feedback delays from 120 to 2120 ms in 16 steps. Performance sharply decreased until about 490 ms, then more gradually until 2120 ms, suggesting that two mechanisms were operating under delayed visual feedback. Since delayed (...)
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  20. Janneke Jehee Dana H. Ballard (2012). Dynamic Coding of Signed Quantities in Cortical Feedback Circuits. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 54.0
    In the early sensory and motor areas of the cortex, individual neurons transmit information about specific sensory features via a peaked response. This concept has been crystallized as `labeled lines,' to denote that axons communicate the specific properties of their sensory or motor parent cell. Such cells also can be characterized as being polarized, that is, as representing a signed quantity that is either positive or negative. We show in a model simulation that there are two important (...)
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  21. Dana H. Ballard & Janneke Jehee (2012). Dynamic Coding of Signed Quantities in Cortical Feedback Circuits. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 54.0
    In the early sensory and motor areas of the cortex, individual neurons transmit information about specific sensory features via a peaked response. This concept has been crystallized as `labeled lines,' to denote that axons communicate the specific properties of their sensory or motor parent cell. Such cells also can be characterized as being polarized, that is, as representing a signed quantity that is either positive or negative. We show in a model simulation that there are two important (...)
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  22. R. C. Miall, M. Malkmus & E. M. Robertson (1996). Sensory Prediction as a Role for the Cerebellum. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):466-467.score: 48.0
    We suggest that the cerebellum generates sensory or estimates based on outgoing motor commands and sensory feedback. Thus, it is not a motor pattern generator (HOUK et al.) but a predictive system which is intimately involved in motor behavior. This theory may explain the sensitivity of the climbing fibers to both unexpected external events and motor errors (SIMPSON et al.), and we speculate that unusual biophysical properties of the inferior olive might allow the cerebellum to develop multiple asynchronous (...)
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  23. James W. Moore & P. C. Fletcher (2012). Sense of Agency in Health and Disease: A Review of Cue Integration Approaches. [REVIEW] Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):59-68.score: 48.0
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  24. Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). Synesthetic Binding and the Reactivation Model of Memory. In Ophelia Deroy (ed.), Sensory Blendings: New essays on synaesthesia. Oxford University Press.score: 42.0
    Despite the recent surge in research on, and interest in, synesthesia, the mechanism underlying this condition is still unknown. Feedforward mechanisms involving overlapping receptive fields of sensory neurons as well as feedback mechanisms involving a lack of signal disinhibition have been proposed. Here I show that a broad range of studies of developmental synesthesia indicate that the mechanism underlying the phenomenon may involve reinstatement of brain activity in different sensory or cognitive streams in a way that is similar (...)
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  25. John Stewart & Olivier Gapenne (2004). Reciprocal Modelling of Active Perception of 2-D Forms in a Simple Tactile-Vision Substitution System. Minds and Machines 14 (3):309-330.score: 42.0
    The strategies of action employed by a human subject in order to perceive simple 2-D forms on the basis of tactile sensory feedback have been modelled by an explicit computer algorithm. The modelling process has been constrained and informed by the capacity of human subjects both to consciously describe their own strategies, and to apply explicit strategies; thus, the strategies effectively employed by the human subject have been influenced by the modelling process itself. On this basis, good qualitative and (...)
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  26. Noël Nguyen Marc Sato, Krystyna Grabski, Maëva Garnier, Lionel Granjon, Jean-Luc Schwartz (2013). Converging Toward a Common Speech Code: Imitative and Perceptuo-Motor Recalibration Processes in Speech Production. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 42.0
    Auditory and somatosensory systems play a key role in speech motor control. In the act of speaking, segmental speech movements are programmed to reach phonemic sensory goals, which in turn are used to estimate actual sensory feedback in order to further control production. The adult's tendency to automatically imitate a number of acoustic-phonetic characteristics in another speaker's speech however suggests that speech production not only relies on the intended phonemic sensory goals and actual sensory feedback but (...)
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  27. Marc Sato, Krystyna Grabski, Maëva Garnier, Lionel Granjon, Jean-Luc L. Schwartz & Noël Nguyen (2013). Converging Toward a Common Speech Code: Imitative and Perceptuo-Motor Recalibration Processes in Speech Production. Frontiers in Psychology 4:422.score: 42.0
    Auditory and somatosensory systems play a key role in speech motor control. In the act of speaking, segmental speech movements are programmed to reach phonemic sensory goals, which in turn are used to estimate actual sensory feedback in order to further control production. The adult's tendency to automatically imitate a number of acoustic-phonetic characteristics in another speaker's speech however suggests that speech production not only relies on the intended phonemic sensory goals and actual sensory feedback but (...)
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  28. Jonathan Cole (2009). Impaired Embodiment and Intersubjectivity. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):343-360.score: 36.0
    This paper considers the importance of the body for self-esteem, communication, and emotional expression and experience, through the reflections of those who live with various neurological impairments of movement and sensation; sensory deafferentation, spinal cord injury and Möbius Syndrome (the congenital absence of facial expression). People with severe sensory loss, who require conscious attention and visual feedback for movement, describe the imperative to use the same strategies to reacquire gesture, to appear normal and have embodied expression. Those paralysed (...)
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  29. Jean Vroomen Yoshimori Sugano, Mirjam Keetels (2012). The Build-Up and Transfer of Sensorimotor Temporal Recalibration Measured Via a Synchronization Task. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 36.0
    The timing relation between a motor action and the sensory consequences of that action can be adapted by exposing participants to artificially delayed feedback (temporal recalibration). Here, we demonstrate that a sensorimotor synchronization task (i.e., tapping the index finger in synchrony with a pacing signal) can be used as a measure of temporal recalibration. Participants were first exposed to a constant delay (~150 ms) between a voluntary action (a finger tap) and an external feedback stimulus of that action (a (...)
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  30. Roger D. Orpwood (2013). Qualia Could Arise From Information Processing in Local Cortical Networks. Frontiers in Psychology 4 (March).score: 36.0
    Re-entrant feedback, either within sensory cortex or arising from prefrontal areas, has been strongly linked to the emergence of consciousness, both in theoretical and experimental work. This idea, together with evidence for local micro-consciousness, suggests the generation of qualia could in some way result from local network activity under re-entrant activation. This paper explores the possibility by examining the processing of information by local cortical networks. It highlights the difference between the information structure (how the information is physically embodied), (...)
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  31. Robert Leech Anna J. Simmonds, Richard J. S. Wise (2011). Two Tongues, One Brain: Imaging Bilingual Speech Production. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 36.0
    This review considers speaking in a second language from the perspective of motor-sensory control. Previous studies relating brain function to the prior acquisition of two or more languages (neurobilingualism) have investigated the differential demands made on linguistic representations and processes, and the role of domain-general cognitive control systems when speakers switch between languages. In contrast to the detailed discussions on these higher functions, typically articulation is considered only as an underspecified stage of simple motor output. The present review considers (...)
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  32. Robert Briscoe (2011). The Elusive Experience of Agency. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):262-267.score: 30.0
    I here present some doubts about whether Mandik’s (2010) proposed intermediacy and recurrence constraints are necessary and sufficient for agentive experience. I also argue that in order to vindicate the conclusion that agentive experience is an exclusively perceptual phenomenon (Prinz, 2007), it is not enough to show that the predictions produced by forward models of planned motor actions are conveyed by mock sensory signals. Rather, it must also be shown that the outputs of “comparator” mechanisms that compare these predictions (...)
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  33. Rick Grush (2004). The Emulation Theory of Representation: Motor Control, Imagery, and Perception. Behavioral And Brain Sciences 27 (3):377-396.score: 30.0
    The emulation theory of representation is developed and explored as a framework that can revealingly synthesize a wide variety of representational functions of the brain. The framework is based on constructs from control theory (forward models) and signal processing (Kalman filters). The idea is that in addition to simply engaging with the body and environment, the brain constructs neural circuits that act as models of the body and environment. During overt sensorimotor engagement, these models are driven by efference copies in (...)
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  34. Peter Langland-Hassan (2008). Fractured Phenomenologies: Thought Insertion, Inner Speech, and the Puzzle of Extraneity. Mind and Language 23 (4):369-401.score: 30.0
    Abstract: How it is that one's own thoughts can seem to be someone else's? After noting some common missteps of other approaches to this puzzle, I develop a novel cognitive solution, drawing on and critiquing theories that understand inserted thoughts and auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia as stemming from mismatches between predicted and actual sensory feedback. Considerable attention is paid to forging links between the first-person phenomenology of thought insertion and the posits (e.g. efference copy, corollary discharge) of current (...)
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  35. Elliot C. Brown & Martin Brüne (2012). The Role of Prediction in Social Neuroscience. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6 (147):147-147.score: 30.0
    Research has shown that the brain is constantly making predictions about future events. Theories of prediction in perception, action and learning suggest that the brain serves to reduce the discrepancies between expectation and actual experience, i.e. by reducing the prediction error. Forward models of action and perception propose the generation of a predictive internal representation of the expected sensory outcome, which is matched to the actual sensory feedback. Shared neural representations have been found when experiencing one’s own and (...)
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  36. R. H. Phaf & G. Wolters (1997). A Constructivist and Connectionist View on Conscious and Nonconscious Processes. Philosophical Psychology 10 (3):287-307.score: 30.0
    Recent experimental findings reveal dissociations of conscious and nonconscious performance in many fields of psychological research, suggesting that conscious and nonconscious effects result from qualitatively different processes. A connectionist view of these processes is put forward in which consciousness is the consequence of construction processes taking place in three types of working memory in a specific type of recurrent neural network. The recurrences arise by feeding back output to the input of a central (representational) network. They are assumed to be (...)
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  37. Gagan Deep Kaur (forthcoming). Kant and the Simulation Hypothesis. AI and Society:1-10.score: 30.0
    Computational imagination (CI) conceives imagination as an agent’s simulated sensorimotor interaction with the environment in the absence of sensory feedback, predicting consequences based on this interaction (Marques and Holland in Neurocomputing 72:743–759, 2009). Its bedrock is the simulation hypothesis whereby imagination resembles seeing or doing something in reality as both involve similar neural structures in the brain (Hesslow in Trends Cogn Sci 6(6):242–247, 2002). This paper raises two-forked doubts: (1) neural-level equivalence is escalated to make phenomenological equivalence. Even at (...)
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  38. David M. Eagleman Mingbo Cai, Chess Stetson (2012). A Neural Model for Temporal Order Judgments and Their Active Recalibration: A Common Mechanism for Space and Time? Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 30.0
    When observers experience a constant delay between their motor actions and sensory feedback, their perception of the temporal order between actions and sensations adapt (Stetson et al., 2006a). We present here a novel neural model that can explain temporal order judgments (TOJs) and their recalibration. Our model employs three ubiquitous features of neural systems: 1) information pooling, 2) opponent processing, and 3) synaptic scaling. Specifically, the model proposes that different populations of neurons encode different delays between motor-sensory events, (...)
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  39. Mingbo Cai, Chess Stetson & David M. Eagleman (2012). A Neural Model for Temporal Order Judgments and Their Active Recalibration: A Common Mechanism for Space and Time? Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 30.0
    When observers experience a constant delay between their motor actions and sensory feedback, their perception of the temporal order between actions and sensations adapt (Stetson et al., 2006a). We present here a novel neural model that can explain temporal order judgments (TOJs) and their recalibration. Our model employs three ubiquitous features of neural systems: 1) information pooling, 2) opponent processing, and 3) synaptic scaling. Specifically, the model proposes that different populations of neurons encode different delays between motor-sensory events, (...)
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  40. Kai Lutz, Roman Puorger, Marcus Cheetham & Lutz Jancke (2013). Development of ERN Together with an Internal Model of Audio-Motor Associations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 30.0
    The brain’s reactions to error are manifested in several event related potentials (ERP) components, derived from electroencephalographic (EEG) signals. Although these components have been known for decades, their interpretation is still controversial. A current hypothesis (first indicator hypothesis) claims that the first indication of an action being erroneous leads to a negative deflection of the EEG signal over frontal midline areas. In some cases this requires sensory feedback in the form of knowledge of results (KR). If KR is given, (...)
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  41. Makoto Ichikawa Masaki Tsujita (2012). Non-Retinotopic Motor-Visual Recalibration to Temporal Lag. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 30.0
    Temporal order judgment between the voluntary motor action and its perceptual feedback is important in distinguishing between a sensory feedback which is caused by observer’s own action and other stimulus, which are irrelevant to that action. Prolonged exposure to fixed temporal lag between motor action and visual feedback recalibrates motor-visual temporal relationship, and consequently shifts the point of subjective simultaneity (PSS). Previous studies on the audio-visual temporal recalibration without voluntary action revealed that both low and high level processing are (...)
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  42. Ian Vine (2001). Motivating Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):190-191.score: 30.0
    Gray's account of a brain mechanism for generating the contents of consciousness is incomplete. Adaptive advantages of conscious functioning need to be sought within the first-person affective sensation motivating flexibly goal-directed actions, as in Humphrey's sensory feedback theory.
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  43. Jean Mary Zarate (2013). The Neural Control of Singing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 30.0
    Singing provides a unique opportunity to examine music performance—the musical instrument is contained wholly within the body, thus eliminating the need for creating artificial instruments or tasks in neuroimaging experiments. Here, more than two decades of voice and singing research will be reviewed to give an overview of the sensory-motor control of the singing voice, starting from the vocal tract and leading up to the brain regions involved in singing. Additionally, to demonstrate how sensory feedback is integrated with (...)
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  44. Mohan Matthen (2006). Review: Action in Perception. [REVIEW] Mind 115 (460):1160-1166.score: 24.0
    This a review of Alva Noë's Action in Perception. It argues that a distinction should be made between the proposition that sensorimotor feedback is used in sensory perception and that perception is of sensorimotor features of the world. Noë fails to make this distinction.
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  45. Hermann Burchard (2011). The Role of Conscious Attention in Perception. Foundations of Science 16 (1):67-99.score: 24.0
    Impressions, energy radiated by phenomena in the momentary environmental scene, enter sensory neurons, creating in afferent nerves a data stream. Following Kant, by our inner sense the mind perceives its own thoughts as it ties together sense data into an internalized scene. The mind, residing in the brain, logically a Language Machine, processes and stores items as coded grammatical entities. Kantian synthetic unity in the linguistic brain is able to deliver our experience of the scene as we appear to (...)
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  46. Edmond Wright (1999). Isomorphism: Philosophical Implications. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (6):975-976.score: 24.0
    The originator of the notion of structural isomorphism was the philosopher Roy Wood Sellars. Many modern philosophers are unaware how this notion vitiates their attacks on the concept of an internal sensory presentation. His view that this allowed for corrective feedback undercuts Palmer's belief that there is a mapping of objects. The privacy of subjective experience is also shown not to be inviolable.
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  47. Kathleen Garrison, Juan Santoyo, Jake Davis, Thomas Thornhill, Catherine Kerr & Judson Brewer (2013). Effortless Awareness: Using Real Time Neurofeedback to Investigate Correlates of Posterior Cingulate Cortex Activity in Meditators' Self-Report. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Neurophenomenological studies seek to utilize first-person self-report to elucidate cognitive processes related to physiological data. Grounded theory offers an approach to the qualitative analysis of self-report, whereby theoretical constructs are derived from empirical data. Here we used grounded theory methodology to assess how the first-person experience of meditation relates to neural activity in a core region of the default mode network –the posterior cingulate cortex. We analyzed first-person data consisting of meditators’ accounts of their subjective experience during runs of a (...)
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  48. Edmond Wright (2001). A Non-Epistemic, Non-Pictorial, Internal, Material Visual Field. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):1010-1011.score: 24.0
    The authors O'Regan & Noë (O&N) have ignored the case for the visual field as being non-epistemic evidence internal to the brain, having no pictorial similarity to the external input, and being material in ontological status. They are also not aware of the case for the evolutionary advantage of learning as the perceptual refashioning of such non-epistemic sensory evidence via motivated feedback in sensorimotor activity.
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  49. Eric A. Salzen (2000). Affect Systems and Neural Systems. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):216-217.score: 24.0
    The “reward” systems described by Rolls are systems for drive-reinforced associations of contact and distant stimuli and not for emotional behaviours. The neural systems delineated may be associated with distinct categories of “affect,” namely “hedonic feelings,” “moods,” and “emotions.” Awareness of these affects requires external perceptual as well as internal feedback. Levels of feedback in evolution and development suggest sensory qualia may not require language.
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  50. Berit Brogaard (2013). Serotonergic Hyperactivity as a Potential Factor in Developmental, Acquired and Drug-Induced Synesthesia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Though synesthesia research has seen a huge growth in recent decades, and tremendous progress has been made in terms of understanding the mechanism and cause of synesthesia, we are still left mostly in the dark when it comes to the mechanistic commonalities (if any) among developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia. We know that many forms of synesthesia involve aberrant structural or functional brain connectivity. Proposed mechanisms include direct projection and disinhibited feedback mechanisms, in which information from two otherwise structurally or (...)
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