Search results for 'Sensory Feedback*' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Felicia Pei-Hsin Cheng, Michael Grossbach & Eckart Altenmüller (2013). Altered Sensory Feedbacks in Pianist's Dystonia: The Altered Auditory Feedback Paradigm and the Glove Effect. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:868.score: 87.0
    Background: This study investigates the effect of altered auditory feedback (AAF) in musician's dystonia (MD) and discusses whether altered auditory feedback can be considered as a sensory trick in MD. Furthermore, the effect of AAF is compared with altered tactile feedback, which can serve as a sensory trick in several other forms of focal dystonia. Methods: The method is based on scale analysis (Jabusch et al. 2004). Experiment 1 employs synchronization paradigm: 12 MD patients and 25 healthy pianists (...)
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  2. Takuya Honda, Nobuhiro Hagura, Toshinori Yoshioka & Hiroshi Imamizu (2013). Imposed Visual Feedback Delay of an Action Changes Mass Perception Based on the Sensory Prediction Error. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 57.0
    While performing an action, the timing of when the sensory feedback is given can be used to establish the causal link between the action and its consequence. It has been shown that delaying the visual feedback while carrying an object makes people feel the mass of the object to be greater, suggesting that the feedback timing can also impact the perceived quality of an external object. In this study, we investigated the origin of the feedback timing information that influences (...)
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  3. Daichi Nozaki Takuya Honda, Masaya Hirashima (2012). Habituation to Feedback Delay Restores Degraded Visuomotor Adaptation by Altering Both Sensory Prediction Error and the Sensitivity of Adaptation to the Error. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 57.0
    Sensory prediction error, which is the difference between actual and predicted sensory consequences, is a driving force of motor learning. Thus, appropriate temporal associations between the actual sensory feedback signals and motor commands for predicting sensory consequences are crucial for the brain to calculate the sensory prediction error accurately. Indeed, it has been shown that artificially introduced delays in visual feedback degrade motor learning. However, our previous study has showed that degraded adaptation is alleviated by (...)
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  4. P. E. Roland (1978). Sensory Feedback to the Cerebral Cortex During Voluntary Movement in Man. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):129.score: 51.0
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  5. John Gyr, Richmond Willey & Adele Henry (1979). Motor-Sensory Feedback and Geometry of Visual Space: An Attempted Replication. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):59-64.score: 51.0
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  6. Bruce Bridgeman (2008). The Role of Motor-Sensory Feedback in the Evolution of Mind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):132-133.score: 48.0
    Seemingly small changes in brain organization can have revolutionary consequences for function. An example is evolution's application of the primate action-planning mechanism to the management of communicative sequences. When feedback from utterances reaches the brain again through a mechanism that evolved to monitor action sequences, it makes another pass through the brain, amplifying the human power of thinking.
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  7. Lei Wang, Christine Sutter, Ronald Josef Zvonimir Dangel, Jochen Musseler & Catherine Disselhorst-Klug (2012). Perceiving One's Own Limb Movements with Conflicting Sensory Feedback: The Role of Mode of Movement Control and Age. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 48.0
    Previous studies have demonstrated a great uncertainty in evaluating one's own voluntary actions when visual feedback is suspended. We now compare these limitations in younger and older adults during active or passive limb movements. Participants put their dominant hand on a robot arm and performed movements actively or the relaxed limb was moved passively. Either a distorted visual feedback or no visual feedback at all was provided during the movement. Perception of limb movements was attenuated through visual feedback. This effect (...)
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  8. Wayne L. Shebilske (1978). Sensory Feedback During Eye Movements Reconsidered. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):160.score: 45.0
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  9. J. Dickinson (1978). The Function of Sensory Feedback. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):148.score: 45.0
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  10. Joseph R. Higgins & Ronald W. Angle (1970). Correction of Tracking Errors Without Sensory Feedback. Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (3):412.score: 45.0
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  11. J. A. Scott Kelso (1979). Motor-Sensory Feedback Formulations: Are We Asking the Right Questions? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):72-73.score: 45.0
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  12. Hans Wallach (1979). Three Functions of Motor-Sensory Feedback in Object Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):84-85.score: 45.0
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  13. Srikantan S. Nagarajan John F. Houde (2011). Speech Production as State Feedback Control. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 42.0
    Spoken language exists because of a remarkable neural process. Inside a speaker’s brain, an intended message gives rise to neural signals activating the muscles of the vocal tract. The process is remarkable because these muscles are activated in just the right way that the vocal tract produces sounds a listener understands as the intended message. What is the best approach to understanding the neural substrate of this crucial motor control process? One of the key recent modeling developments in neuroscience has (...)
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  14. Sukhvinder S. Obhi (2007). Evidence for Feedback Dependent Conscious Awareness of Action. Brain Research 1161:88-94.score: 39.0
  15. Dh Warren & Er Strelow (1986). The Role of Feedback in Sensory Aid Learning. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 24 (5):353-353.score: 36.0
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  16. Simon Clavagnier, Arnaud Falchier & Henry Kennedy (2004). Long-Distance Feedback Projections to Area V1: Implications for Multisensory Integration, Spatial Awareness, and Visual Consciousness. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience. Special Issue 4 (2):117-126.score: 33.0
  17. David Suarez, Diana Acosta Navas, Umut Baysan & Kevin Connolly (forthcoming). Sensory Substitution and Non-Sensory Feelings. In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), Sensory Substitution and Augmentation. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    One of the central limitations of sensory substitution devices (SSDs) is their inability to reproduce the non-sensory feelings that are normally associated with visual experiences, especially hedonic and aesthetic responses. This limitation is sometimes reported to cause SSD users frustration. To make matters worse, it is unclear that improvements in acuity, bandwidth, or training will resolve the issue. Yet, if SSDs are to actually reproduce visual experience in its fullness, it seems that the reproduction of non-sensory feelings (...)
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  18. Matthew Brown & Derek Besner (2002). Semantic Priming: On the Role of Awareness in Visual Word Recognition in the Absence of an Expectancy. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):402-422.score: 30.0
  19. Waka Fujisaki (2012). Effects of Delayed Visual Feedback on Grooved Pegboard Test Performance. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 30.0
    Using four experiments, this study investigates what amount of delay brings about maximal impairment under delayed visual feedback and whether a critical interval, such as that in audition, also exists in vision. The first experiment measured the Grooved Pegboard test performance as a function of visual feedback delays from 120 to 2120 ms in 16 steps. Performance sharply decreased until about 490 ms, then more gradually until 2120 ms, suggesting that two mechanisms were operating under delayed visual feedback. Since delayed (...)
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  20. Dana H. Ballard & Janneke Jehee (2012). Dynamic Coding of Signed Quantities in Cortical Feedback Circuits. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 27.0
    In the early sensory and motor areas of the cortex, individual neurons transmit information about specific sensory features via a peaked response. This concept has been crystallized as `labeled lines,' to denote that axons communicate the specific properties of their sensory or motor parent cell. Such cells also can be characterized as being polarized, that is, as representing a signed quantity that is either positive or negative. We show in a model simulation that there are two important (...)
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  21. Janneke Jehee Dana H. Ballard (2012). Dynamic Coding of Signed Quantities in Cortical Feedback Circuits. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 27.0
    In the early sensory and motor areas of the cortex, individual neurons transmit information about specific sensory features via a peaked response. This concept has been crystallized as `labeled lines,' to denote that axons communicate the specific properties of their sensory or motor parent cell. Such cells also can be characterized as being polarized, that is, as representing a signed quantity that is either positive or negative. We show in a model simulation that there are two important (...)
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  22. R. C. Miall, M. Malkmus & E. M. Robertson (1996). Sensory Prediction as a Role for the Cerebellum. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):466-467.score: 24.0
    We suggest that the cerebellum generates sensory or estimates based on outgoing motor commands and sensory feedback. Thus, it is not a motor pattern generator (HOUK et al.) but a predictive system which is intimately involved in motor behavior. This theory may explain the sensitivity of the climbing fibers to both unexpected external events and motor errors (SIMPSON et al.), and we speculate that unusual biophysical properties of the inferior olive might allow the cerebellum to develop multiple asynchronous (...)
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  23. James W. Moore & P. C. Fletcher (2012). Sense of Agency in Health and Disease: A Review of Cue Integration Approaches. [REVIEW] Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):59-68.score: 24.0
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  24. Robert Briscoe (forthcoming). Bodily Action and Distal Attribution in Sensory Substitution. In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), Sensory Substitution and Augmentation. Proceedings of the British Academy.score: 21.0
    According to proponents of the sensorimotor contingency theory of perception (Hurley & Noë 2003, Noë 2004, O’Regan 2011), active control of camera movement is necessary for the emergence of distal attribution in tactile-visual sensory substitution (TVSS) because it enables the subject to acquire knowledge of the way stimulation in the substituting modality varies as a function of self-initiated, bodily action. This chapter, by contrast, approaches distal attribution as a solution to a causal inference problem faced by the subject’s perceptual (...)
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  25. Kevin Connolly (forthcoming). Sensory Substitution and Perceptual Learning. In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), Sensory Substitution and Augmentation. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    When a user integrates a sensory substitution device into her life, the process involves perceptual learning, that is, ‘relatively long-lasting changes to an organism’s perceptual system that improve its ability to respond to its environment’ (Goldstone 1998: 585). In this paper, I explore ways in which the extensive literature on perceptual learning can be applied to help improve sensory substitution devices. I then use these findings to answer a philosophical question. Much of the philosophical debate surrounding sensory (...)
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  26. Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). Synesthetic Binding and the Reactivation Model of Memory. In Ophelia Deroy (ed.), Sensory Blendings: New essays on synaesthesia. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    Despite the recent surge in research on, and interest in, synesthesia, the mechanism underlying this condition is still unknown. Feedforward mechanisms involving overlapping receptive fields of sensory neurons as well as feedback mechanisms involving a lack of signal disinhibition have been proposed. Here I show that a broad range of studies of developmental synesthesia indicate that the mechanism underlying the phenomenon may involve reinstatement of brain activity in different sensory or cognitive streams in a way that is similar (...)
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  27. John Stewart & Olivier Gapenne (2004). Reciprocal Modelling of Active Perception of 2-D Forms in a Simple Tactile-Vision Substitution System. Minds and Machines 14 (3):309-330.score: 21.0
    The strategies of action employed by a human subject in order to perceive simple 2-D forms on the basis of tactile sensory feedback have been modelled by an explicit computer algorithm. The modelling process has been constrained and informed by the capacity of human subjects both to consciously describe their own strategies, and to apply explicit strategies; thus, the strategies effectively employed by the human subject have been influenced by the modelling process itself. On this basis, good qualitative and (...)
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  28. Noël Nguyen Marc Sato, Krystyna Grabski, Maëva Garnier, Lionel Granjon, Jean-Luc Schwartz (2013). Converging Toward a Common Speech Code: Imitative and Perceptuo-Motor Recalibration Processes in Speech Production. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 21.0
    Auditory and somatosensory systems play a key role in speech motor control. In the act of speaking, segmental speech movements are programmed to reach phonemic sensory goals, which in turn are used to estimate actual sensory feedback in order to further control production. The adult's tendency to automatically imitate a number of acoustic-phonetic characteristics in another speaker's speech however suggests that speech production not only relies on the intended phonemic sensory goals and actual sensory feedback but (...)
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  29. Marc Sato, Krystyna Grabski, Maëva Garnier, Lionel Granjon, Jean-Luc L. Schwartz & Noël Nguyen (2013). Converging Toward a Common Speech Code: Imitative and Perceptuo-Motor Recalibration Processes in Speech Production. Frontiers in Psychology 4:422.score: 21.0
    Auditory and somatosensory systems play a key role in speech motor control. In the act of speaking, segmental speech movements are programmed to reach phonemic sensory goals, which in turn are used to estimate actual sensory feedback in order to further control production. The adult's tendency to automatically imitate a number of acoustic-phonetic characteristics in another speaker's speech however suggests that speech production not only relies on the intended phonemic sensory goals and actual sensory feedback but (...)
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  30. Kevin Connolly, Diana Acosta Navas, Umut Baysan, Janiv Paulsberg & David Suarez, Sensory Substitution Conference Full Report.score: 18.0
    This report highlights and explores five questions that arose from the workshop on sensory substitution and augmentation at the British Academy, March 26th through 28th, 2013.
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  31. Julian Kiverstein & Mirko Farina (forthcoming). Do Sensory Substitution Extend the Conscious Mind? In Fabio Paglieri (ed.), Consciousness in interaction: the role of the natural and social context in shaping consciousness". Amsterdam: John Benjamins. John Benjamins.score: 18.0
    Is the brain the biological substrate of consciousness? Most naturalistic philosophers of mind have supposed that the answer must obviously be «yes » to this question. However, a growing number of philosophers working in 4e (embodied, embedded, extended, enactive) cognitive science have begun to challenge this assumption, arguing instead that consciousness supervenes on the whole embodied animal in dynamic interaction with the environment. We call views that share this claim dynamic sensorimotor theories of consciousness (DSM). Clark (2009) a founder and (...)
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  32. Boyd Millar (2011). Sensory Phenomenology and Perceptual Content. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (244):558-576.score: 18.0
    The consensus in contemporary philosophy of mind is that how a perceptual experience represents the world to be is built into its sensory phenomenology. I defend an opposing view which I call ‘moderate separatism’, that an experience's sensory phenomenology does not determine how it represents the world to be. I argue for moderate separatism by pointing to two ordinary experiences which instantiate the same sensory phenomenology but differ with regard to their intentional content. Two experiences of an (...)
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  33. Kevin Connolly, Craig French, David M. Gray & Adrienne Prettyman, Space, Time, and Sensory Integration (Network for Sensory Research/Brown University Workshop on Unity of Consciousness, Question 4).score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt of a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration conference at Brown University in November of 2011. This portion of the report explores the question: Is the mechanism of sensory integration spatio-temporal?
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  34. Kevin Connolly, Craig French, David M. Gray & Adrienne Prettyman, The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration: Conference Report.score: 18.0
    This report highlights and explores five questions which arose from The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration conference at Brown University in November of 2011: 1. What is the relationship between the unity of consciousness and sensory integration? 2. Are some of the basic units of consciousness multimodal? 3. How should we model the unity of consciousness? 4. Is the mechanism of sensory integration spatio-temporal? 5. How Should We Study Experience, Given Unity Relations?
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  35. Ophelia Deroy & Malika Auvray (forthcoming). Beyond Vision: The Vertical Integration of Sensory Substitution Devices. In M. Matthen & D. Stokes (eds.), Perception and Its Modalities.score: 18.0
    What if a blind person could 'see' with her ears? Thanks to Sensory Substitution Devices (SSDs), blind people now have access to out-of-reach objects, a privilege reserved so far for the sighted. In this paper, we show that the philosophical debates have fundamentally been mislead to think that SSDs should be fitted among the existing senses or that they constitute a new sense. Contrary to the existing assumption that they get integrated at the sensory level, we present a (...)
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  36. Kevin Connolly, Craig French, David M. Gray & Adrienne Prettyman, The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration (Network for Sensory Research/Brown University Workshop on Unity of Consciousness, Question 1).score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt of a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration conference at Brown University in November of 2011. This portion of the report explores the question: What is the relationship between the unity of consciousness and sensory integration?
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  37. Kevin Connolly, Craig French, David M. Gray & Adrienne Prettyman, Multimodal Building Blocks? (Network for Sensory Research/Brown University Workshop on Unity of Consciousness, Question 2).score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt of a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration conference at Brown University in November of 2011. This portion of the report explores the question: Are some of the basic units of consciousness multimodal?
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  38. Kevin Connolly, Craig French, David M. Gray & Adrienne Prettyman, Modeling the Unity of Consciousness (Network for Sensory Research/Brown University Workshop on Unity of Consciousness, Question 3).score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt of a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration conference at Brown University in November of 2011. This portion of the report explores the question: How should we model the unity of consciousness?
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  39. Kevin Connolly, Craig French, David M. Gray & Adrienne Prettyman, Studying Experience as Unified (Network for Sensory Research/Brown University Workshop on Unity of Consciousness, Question 5).score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt of a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration conference at Brown University in November of 2011. This portion of the report explores the question: How should we study experience, given unity relations?
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  40. Andreas K. Engel & Wolf Singer (2001). Temporal Binding and the Neural Correlates of Sensory Awareness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):16-25.score: 18.0
    Theories of binding have recently come into the focus of the consciousness debate. In this review, we discuss the potential relevance of temporal binding mechanisms for sensory awareness. Specifically, we suggest that neural synchrony with a precision in the millisecond range may be crucial for conscious processing, and may be involved in arousal, perceptual integration, attentional selection and working memory. Recent evidence from both animal and human studies demonstrates that specific changes in neuronal synchrony occur during all of these (...)
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  41. Jonathan Cole (2009). Impaired Embodiment and Intersubjectivity. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):343-360.score: 18.0
    This paper considers the importance of the body for self-esteem, communication, and emotional expression and experience, through the reflections of those who live with various neurological impairments of movement and sensation; sensory deafferentation, spinal cord injury and Möbius Syndrome (the congenital absence of facial expression). People with severe sensory loss, who require conscious attention and visual feedback for movement, describe the imperative to use the same strategies to reacquire gesture, to appear normal and have embodied expression. Those paralysed (...)
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  42. Kevin Connolly, Diana Acosta Navas, Umut Baysan, Janiv Paulsberg & David Suarez, Sensory Substitution Conference Question Three.score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt from a report on the Sensory Substitution and Augmentation Conference at the British Academy in March of 2013. This portion of the report explores the question: How does sensory substitution interact with the brain’s architecture?
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  43. Kevin Connolly, Diana Acosta Navas, Umut Baysan, Janiv Paulsberg & David Suarez, Sensory Substitution Conference Question Two.score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt from a report on the Sensory Substitution and Augmentation Conference at the British Academy in March of 2013. This portion of the report explores the question: What can sensory substitution tell us about perceptual learning?
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  44. Richard Gray (2014). Pain, Perception and the Sensory Modalities: Revisiting the Intensive Theory. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (1):87-101.score: 18.0
    Pain is commonly explained in terms of the perceptual activity of a distinct sensory modality, the function of which is to enable us to perceive actual or potential damage to the body. However, the characterization of pain experience in terms of a distinct sensory modality with such content is problematic. I argue that pain is better explained as occupying a different role in relation to perception: to indicate when the stimuli that are sensed in perceiving anything by means (...)
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  45. Helena De Preester (2012). The Sensory Component of Imagination: The Motor Theory of Imagination as a Present-Day Solution to Sartre's Critique. Philosophical Psychology 25 (4):1-18.score: 18.0
    Several recent accounts claim that imagination is a matter of simulating perceptual acts. Although this point of view receives support from both phenomenological and empirical research, I claim that Jean-Paul Sartre's worry formulated in L'imagination (1936) still holds. For a number of reasons, Sartre heavily criticizes theories in which the sensory material of imaginative acts consists in reviving sensory impressions. Based on empirical and philosophical insights, this article explains how simulation theories of imagination can overcome Sartre's critique by (...)
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  46. Kevin Connolly, Diana Acosta Navas, Umut Baysan, Janiv Paulsberg & David Suarez, Sensory Substitution Conference Report Question One.score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt from a report on the Sensory Substitution and Augmentation Conference at the British Academy in March of 2013. This portion of the report explores the question: Does sensory substitution generate perceptual or cognitive states?
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  47. Crawford L. Elder (1998). What Sensory Signals Are About. Analysis 58 (4):273-276.score: 18.0
    In ‘Of Sensory Systems and the “Aboutness” of Mental States’, Kathleen Akins (1996) argues against what she calls ‘the traditional view’ about sensory systems, according to which they are detectors of features in the environment outside the organism. As an antidote, she considers the case of thermoreception, a system whose sensors send signals about how things stand with themselves and their immediate dermal surround (a ‘narcissistic’ sensory system); and she closes by suggesting that the signals from many (...)
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  48. Malika Auvray & Erik Myin (2009). Perception With Compensatory Devices: From Sensory Substitution to Sensorimotor Extension. Cognitive Science 33 (6):1036–1058.score: 18.0
    Sensory substitution devices provide through an unusual sensory modality (the substituting modality, e.g., audition) access to features of the world that are normally accessed through another sensory modality (the substituted modality, e.g., vision). In this article, we address the question of which sensory modality the acquired perception belongs to. We have recourse to the four traditional criteria that have been used to define sensory modalities: sensory organ, stimuli, properties, and qualitative experience (Grice, 1962), to (...)
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  49. Kevin Connolly, Diana Acosta Navas, Umut Baysan, Janiv Paulsberg & David Suarez, Sensory Substitution Conference Question Four.score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt from a report on the Sensory Substitution and Augmentation Conference at the British Academy in March of 2013. This portion of the report explores the question: Can normal non-sensory feelings be generated through sensory substitution?
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  50. Kevin Connolly, Diana Acosta Navas, Umut Baysan, Janiv Paulsberg & David Suarez, Sensory Substitution Conference Question Five.score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt from a report on the Sensory Substitution and Augmentation Conference at the British Academy in March of 2013. This portion of the report explores the question: What are the limitations of sensory substitution.
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