Search results for 'Sensory Integration' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kevin Connolly, Craig French, David M. Gray & Adrienne Prettyman, Space, Time, and Sensory Integration (Network for Sensory Research/Brown University Workshop on Unity of Consciousness, Question 4).score: 240.0
    This is an excerpt of a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration conference at Brown University in November of 2011. This portion of the report explores the question: Is the mechanism of sensory integration spatio-temporal?
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  2. Kevin Connolly, Craig French, David M. Gray & Adrienne Prettyman, The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration: Conference Report.score: 240.0
    This report highlights and explores five questions which arose from The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration conference at Brown University in November of 2011: 1. What is the relationship between the unity of consciousness and sensory integration? 2. Are some of the basic units of consciousness multimodal? 3. How should we model the unity of consciousness? 4. Is the mechanism of sensory integration spatio-temporal? 5. How Should We Study Experience, Given Unity Relations?
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  3. Kevin Connolly, Craig French, David M. Gray & Adrienne Prettyman, The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration (Network for Sensory Research/Brown University Workshop on Unity of Consciousness, Question 1).score: 240.0
    This is an excerpt of a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration conference at Brown University in November of 2011. This portion of the report explores the question: What is the relationship between the unity of consciousness and sensory integration?
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  4. Vernon O. Tyler Jr (1962). Sensory Integration with and Without Reinforcement. Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (4):381.score: 210.0
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  5. [deleted]Florian Lanz, Véronique Moret, Eric Michel Rouiller & Gérard Loquet (2013). Multisensory Integration in Non-Human Primates During a Sensory-Motor Task. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 192.0
    Daily our central nervous system receives inputs via several sensory modalities, processes them and integrates information in order to produce a suitable behaviour. The amazing part is that such a multisensory integration brings all information into a unified percept. An approach to start investigating this property is to show that perception is better and faster when multimodal stimuli are used as compared to unimodal stimuli. This forms the first part of the present study conducted in a non-human primate’s (...)
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  6. Kevin Connolly, John Donaldson, David M. Gray, Emily McWilliams, Sofia Ortiz-Hinojosa & David Suarez, Multi-Sensory Integration and Time (Network for Sensory Research Toronto Workshop on Perceptual Learning: Question Three).score: 180.0
    This is an excerpt from a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from the workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of Toronto, Mississauga on May 10th and 11th, 2012. This excerpt explores the question: Does our representation of time provide and amodal framework for multi-sensory integration?
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  7. J. Trojan, A. M. Stolle, A. M. Carl, D. Kleinböhl, H. Z. Tan & R. Hölzl (2009). Spatiotemporal Integration in Somatosensory Perception: Effects of Sensory Saltation on Pointing at Perceived Positions on the Body Surface. Frontiers in Psychology 1:206-206.score: 156.0
    In the past, sensory saltation phenomena (Geldard & Sherrick, Science, 1972) have been used repeatedly to analyze the spatiotemporal integration capacity of somatosensory and other sensory mechanisms by means of their psychophysical characteristic. The core phenomenon consists in a systematic mislocalization of one tactile stimulus (the attractee) towards another successive tactile stimulus (the attractant) presented at another location, increasing with shorter intervals. In a series of four experiments, sensory saltation characteristics were studied at the forearm and (...)
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  8. David Bennett & Chris Hill (eds.) (forthcoming). Sensory Integration and the Unity of Consciousness. MIT Press.score: 150.0
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  9. [deleted]Marialuisa Gandolfi, Christian Geroin, Alessandro Picelli, Daniele Munari, Andreas Waldner, Stefano Tamburin, Fabio Marchioretto & Nicola Smania (2014). Robot-Assisted Vs. Sensory Integration Training in Treating Gait and Balance Dysfunctions in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 150.0
  10. Christopher T. Lovelace & Sarah Partan (2001). Integrating Sensory Integration. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (2):48-49.score: 150.0
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  11. Jennifer Matey (forthcoming). Sensory Integration and the Unity of Consciousness.score: 150.0
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  12. Barry E. Stein, Terrence R. Stanford & Mark T. Wallace (2003). Sensory Integration, Neural Basis Of. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.score: 150.0
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  13. Ophelia Deroy & Malika Auvray (forthcoming). Beyond Vision: The Vertical Integration of Sensory Substitution Devices. In M. Matthen & D. Stokes (eds.), Perception and Its Modalities.score: 144.0
    What if a blind person could 'see' with her ears? Thanks to Sensory Substitution Devices (SSDs), blind people now have access to out-of-reach objects, a privilege reserved so far for the sighted. In this paper, we show that the philosophical debates have fundamentally been mislead to think that SSDs should be fitted among the existing senses or that they constitute a new sense. Contrary to the existing assumption that they get integrated at the sensory level, we present a (...)
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  14. Kevin Connolly, Craig French, David M. Gray & Adrienne Prettyman, Multimodal Building Blocks? (Network for Sensory Research/Brown University Workshop on Unity of Consciousness, Question 2).score: 120.0
    This is an excerpt of a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration conference at Brown University in November of 2011. This portion of the report explores the question: Are some of the basic units of consciousness multimodal?
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  15. Kevin Connolly, Craig French, David M. Gray & Adrienne Prettyman, Modeling the Unity of Consciousness (Network for Sensory Research/Brown University Workshop on Unity of Consciousness, Question 3).score: 120.0
    This is an excerpt of a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration conference at Brown University in November of 2011. This portion of the report explores the question: How should we model the unity of consciousness?
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  16. Kevin Connolly, Craig French, David M. Gray & Adrienne Prettyman, Studying Experience as Unified (Network for Sensory Research/Brown University Workshop on Unity of Consciousness, Question 5).score: 120.0
    This is an excerpt of a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from The Unity of Consciousness and Sensory Integration conference at Brown University in November of 2011. This portion of the report explores the question: How should we study experience, given unity relations?
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  17. Cyriel M. A. Pennartz (2009). Identification and Integration of Sensory Modalities: Neural Basis and Relation to Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):718-739.score: 120.0
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  18. [deleted]Pascual-Leone A. (2008). Audio-Visual Integration for Objects, Location and Low-Level Dynamic Stimuli: Novel Insights From Studying Sensory Substitution and Topographical Mapping. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 120.0
  19. [deleted]’Ōiwi Parker Jones, Susan Prejawa, Thomas M. H. Hope, Marion Oberhuber, Mohamed L. Seghier, Alex P. Leff, David W. Green & Cathy J. Price (2014). Sensory-to-Motor Integration During Auditory Repetition: A Combined fMRI and Lesion Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 120.0
  20. Jörg Trojan, Annette M. Stolle, Antonija Mršić Carl, Dieter Kleinböhl, Hong Z. Tan & Rupert Hölzl (2010). Spatiotemporal Integration in Somatosensory Perception: Effects of Sensory Saltation on Pointing at Perceived Positions on the Body Surface. Frontiers in Psychology 1:206.score: 120.0
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  21. Andreas K. Engel & Wolf Singer (2001). Temporal Binding and the Neural Correlates of Sensory Awareness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):16-25.score: 114.0
    Theories of binding have recently come into the focus of the consciousness debate. In this review, we discuss the potential relevance of temporal binding mechanisms for sensory awareness. Specifically, we suggest that neural synchrony with a precision in the millisecond range may be crucial for conscious processing, and may be involved in arousal, perceptual integration, attentional selection and working memory. Recent evidence from both animal and human studies demonstrates that specific changes in neuronal synchrony occur during all of (...)
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  22. [deleted]Jessica Freiherr, Johan N. Lundström, Ute Habel & Kathrin Reetz (2013). Multisensory Integration Mechanisms During Aging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:863.score: 114.0
    The rapid demographical shift occurring in our society implies that understanding of healthy aging and age-related diseases is one of our major future challenges. Sensory impairments have an enormous impact on our lives and are closely linked to cognitive functioning. Due to the inherent complexity of sensory perceptions, we are commonly presented with a complex multisensory stimulation and the brain integrates the information from the individual sensory channels into a unique and holistic percept. The cerebral processes involved (...)
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  23. Kevin Connolly (forthcoming). Sensory Substitution and Perceptual Learning. In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), Sensory Substitution and Augmentation. Oxford University Press.score: 96.0
    When a user integrates a sensory substitution device into her life, the process involves perceptual learning, that is, ‘relatively long-lasting changes to an organism’s perceptual system that improve its ability to respond to its environment’ (Goldstone 1998: 585). In this paper, I explore ways in which the extensive literature on perceptual learning can be applied to help improve sensory substitution devices. I then use these findings to answer a philosophical question. Much of the philosophical debate surrounding sensory (...)
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  24. [deleted]Felicia Pei-Hsin Cheng, Michael Grossbach & Eckart Altenmüller (2013). Altered Sensory Feedbacks in Pianist's Dystonia: The Altered Auditory Feedback Paradigm and the Glove Effect. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:868.score: 96.0
    Background: This study investigates the effect of altered auditory feedback (AAF) in musician's dystonia (MD) and discusses whether altered auditory feedback can be considered as a sensory trick in MD. Furthermore, the effect of AAF is compared with altered tactile feedback, which can serve as a sensory trick in several other forms of focal dystonia. Methods: The method is based on scale analysis (Jabusch et al. 2004). Experiment 1 employs synchronization paradigm: 12 MD patients and 25 healthy pianists (...)
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  25. Mark Johnston (2006). Better Than Mere Knowledge? The Function of Sensory Awareness. In T.S. Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.), Perceptual Experience. Oxford University Press. 260--290.score: 90.0
  26. Simon Clavagnier, Arnaud Falchier & Henry Kennedy (2004). Long-Distance Feedback Projections to Area V1: Implications for Multisensory Integration, Spatial Awareness, and Visual Consciousness. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience. Special Issue 4 (2):117-126.score: 90.0
  27. Bryan Paton, Jakob Hohwy & Peter Enticott (2011). The Rubber Hand Illusion Reveals Proprioceptive and Sensorimotor Differences in Autism Spectrum Disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.score: 84.0
    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterised by differences in unimodal and multimodal sensory and proprioceptive processing, with complex biases towards local over global processing. Many of these elements are implicated in versions of the rubber hand illusion (RHI), which were therefore studied in high-functioning individuals with ASD and a typically developing control group. Both groups experienced the illusion. A number of differences were found, related to proprioception and sensorimotor processes. The ASD group showed reduced sensitivity to visuotactile-proprioceptive discrepancy but (...)
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  28. D. Stokes, M. Matthen & S. Biggs (eds.) (2014). Perception and Its Modalities. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    This volume is about the many ways we perceive. Contributors explore the nature of the individual senses, how and what they tell us about the world, and how they interrelate. They consider how the senses extract perceptual content from receptoral information. They consider what kinds of objects we perceive and whether multiple senses ever perceive a single event. They consider how many senses we have, what makes one sense distinct from another, and whether and why distinguishing senses may be useful. (...)
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  29. Barbara Tillmann (2012). Music and Language Perception: Expectations, Structural Integration, and Cognitive Sequencing. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):568-584.score: 66.0
    Music can be described as sequences of events that are structured in pitch and time. Studying music processing provides insight into how complex event sequences are learned, perceived, and represented by the brain. Given the temporal nature of sound, expectations, structural integration, and cognitive sequencing are central in music perception (i.e., which sounds are most likely to come next and at what moment should they occur?). This paper focuses on similarities in music and language cognition research, showing that music (...)
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  30. Eugenie Roudaia, Allison B. Sekuler, Patrick J. Bennett & Robert W. Sekuler (2013). Aging and Audio-Visual and Multi-Cue Integration in Motion. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 66.0
    The perception of naturalistic events relies on the ability to integrate information from multiple sensory systems, an ability that may change with healthy aging. When two objects move toward and then past one another, their trajectories are perceptually ambiguous: the objects may seem to stream past one another or bounce off one another. Previous research showed that auditory or visual events that occur at the time of discs' coincidence could bias the percept toward bouncing or streaming. We exploited this (...)
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  31. [deleted]Silke Manuela Kärcher, Sandra Fenzlaff, Daniela Hartmann, Saskia Kathi Nagel & Peter König (2012). Sensory Augmentation for the Blind. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:37-37.score: 66.0
    Enacted theories of consciousness conjecture that perception and cognition arise from an active experience of the regular relations that are tying together the sensory stimulation of different modalities and associated motor actions. Previous experiments investigated this concept by employing the technique of sensory substitution. Building on these studies, here we test a set of hypotheses derived from this framework and investigate the utility of sensory augmentation in handicapped people. We provide a late blind subject with a new (...)
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  32. Malika Auvray Ophelia Deroy (2012). Reading the World Through the Skin and Ears: A New Perspective on Sensory Substitution. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 66.0
    Sensory substitution devices aim at replacing or assisting one or several functions of a deficient sensory modality by means of another sensory modality. Despite the numerous studies and research programs devoted to their development and integration, sensory substitution devices have failed to live up to their goal of allowing one to ‘see with the skin’ (White et al., 1970) or to “see with the brain” (Bach-y-Rita et al., 2003). These somewhat peremptory claims, as well as (...)
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  33. Pamela D. Butler, Ilana Y. Abeles, Steven M. Silverstein, Elisa C. Dias, Nicole G. Weiskopf, Daniel C. Calderone & Pejman Sehatpour (2013). An Event-Related Potential Examination of Contour Integration Deficits in Schizophrenia. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 66.0
    Perceptual organization, which refers to the ability to integrate fragments of stimuli to form a representation of a whole edge, part, or object, is impaired in schizophrenia. A contour integration paradigm, involving detection of a set of Gabor patches forming an oval contour pointing to the right or left embedded in a field of randomly oriented Gabors, has been developed for use in clinical trials of schizophrenia. The purpose of the present study was to assess contributions of early and (...)
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  34. Jonathan Hope (2010). Umwelträume and Multisensory Integration. Mirror Perspectives on the Subject–Object Dichotomy. Biosemiotics 3 (1):93-105.score: 66.0
    This paper concerns epistemic developments in the field of sensory perception. I argue that Uexküll’s concept of the Umwelträume and certain principles of multisensory integration explain and describe in similar terms the manner in which different sensory modalities interact. Indeed, they both concern knowledge, describing in spatial terms how the mind makes itself up, makes up its objects, and how the objects, in turn, make up the mind. My intention is to set side by side these two (...)
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  35. [deleted]André Lee, Shinichi Furuya, Matthias Karst & Eckart Altenmüller (2013). Alteration in Forward Model Prediction of Sensory Outcome of Motor Action in Focal Hand Dystonia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 66.0
    Focal hand dystonia in musicians is a movement disorder affecting highly trained movements. Rather than being a pure motor disorder related to movement execution only, movement planning, error prediction and sensorimotor integration are also impaired. Internal models, of which two types, forward and inverse models have been described and most likely processed in the cerebellum, are known to be involved in these tasks. Recent results indicate that the cerebellum may be involved in the pathophysiology of focal dystonia. Thus the (...)
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  36. Iain D. Gilchrist Peter J. Etchells, Christopher P. Benton, Casimir J. H. Ludwig (2011). Testing a Simplified Method for Measuring Velocity Integration in Saccades Using a Manipulation of Target Contrast. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 66.0
    A growing number of studies in vision research employ analyses of how perturbations in visual stimuli influence behaviour on single trials. Recently, we have developed a method along such lines to assess the time course over which object velocity information is extracted on a trial-by-trial basis in order to produce an accurate intercepting saccade to a moving target. Here, we present a simplified version of this methodology, and use it to investigate how changes in stimulus contrast affect the temporal velocity (...)
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  37. Stephen Biggs, Mohan Matthen & Dustin Stokes (2014). Sorting the Senses. In Dustin Stokes, Mohan Matthen & Stephen Biggs (eds.), Perception and its Modalities. Oxford University Press. 1-19.score: 60.0
    We perceive in many ways. But several dubious presuppositions about the senses mask this diversity of perception. Philosophers, scientists, and engineers alike too often presuppose that the senses (vision, audition, etc.) are independent sources of information, perception being a sum of these independent contributions. We too often presuppose that we can generalize from vision to other senses. We too often presuppose that vision itself is best understood as a passive receptacle for an image thrown by a lens. In this essay (...)
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  38. Kevin Connolly, John Donaldson, David M. Gray, Emily McWilliams, Sofia Ortiz-Hinojosa & David Suarez, Report on the Network for Sensory Research Toronto Workshop on Perceptual Learning.score: 60.0
    This report highlights and explores five questions which arose from the workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of Toronto, Mississauga on May 10th and 11th, 2012: 1. How should we demarcate perceptual learning from perceptual development? 2. What are the origins of multimodal associations? 3. Does our representation of time provide an amodal framework for multi-sensory integration? 4. What counts as cognitive penetration? 5. How can philosophers and psychologists most fruitfully collaborate?
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  39. Jakob Hohwy & Bryan Paton (2010). Explaining Away the Body: Experiences of Supernaturally Caused Touch and Touch on Non-Hand Objects Within the Rubber Hand Illusion. PLoS ONE 5 (2):e9416.score: 60.0
    In rubber hand illusions and full body illusions, touch sensations are projected to non-body objects such as rubber hands, dolls or virtual bodies. The robustness, limits and further perceptual consequences of such illusions are not yet fully explored or understood. A number of experiments are reported that test the limits of a variant of the rubber hand illusion. Methodology/Principal Findings -/- A variant of the rubber hand illusion is explored, in which the real and foreign hands are aligned in personal (...)
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  40. Justus V. Verhagen (2007). The Neurocognitive Bases of Human Multimodal Food Perception: Consciousness. Brain Research Reviews 53 (2):271-286.score: 60.0
  41. Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). Synesthetic Binding and the Reactivation Model of Memory. In Ophelia Deroy (ed.), Sensory Blendings: New essays on synaesthesia. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Despite the recent surge in research on, and interest in, synesthesia, the mechanism underlying this condition is still unknown. Feedforward mechanisms involving overlapping receptive fields of sensory neurons as well as feedback mechanisms involving a lack of signal disinhibition have been proposed. Here I show that a broad range of studies of developmental synesthesia indicate that the mechanism underlying the phenomenon may involve reinstatement of brain activity in different sensory or cognitive streams in a way that is similar (...)
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  42. Lewis M. Nashner & Gin McCollum (1985). The Organization of Human Postural Movements: A Formal Basis and Experimental Synthesis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):135-150.score: 60.0
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  43. [deleted]Jürgen Konczak & Giovanni Abbruzzese (2013). Focal Dystonia in Musicians: Linking Motor Symptoms to Somatosensory Dysfunction. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 60.0
  44. Jochen Müsseler Christine Sutter, Stefan Ladwig, Michael Oehl (2012). Age Effects on Controlling Tools with Sensorimotor Transformations. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 60.0
    Controlling tools in technical environments bears a lot of challenges for the human information processing system, as locations of tool manipulation and effect appearance are spatially separated, and distal action effects are often not generated in a 1:1 manner. In this study we investigated the susceptibility of older adults to distal action effects. Younger and older participants performed a Fitts’ task on a digitizer tablet without seeing their hand and the tablet directly. Visual feedback was presented on a display in (...)
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  45. David Burr Monica Gori, Giacomo Mazzilli, Giulio Sandini (2011). Cross-Sensory Facilitation Reveals Neural Interactions Between Visual and Tactile Motion in Humans. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 60.0
    Many recent studies show that the human brain integrates information across the different senses and that stimuli of one sensory modality can enhance the perception of other modalities. Here we study the processes that mediate cross-modal facilitation and summation between visual and tactile motion. We find that while summation produced a generic, non-specific improvement of thresholds, probably reflecting higher-order interaction of decision signals, facilitation reveals a strong, direction-specific interaction, which we believe reflects sensory interactions. We measured visual and (...)
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  46. N. Leopold Logothetis & Sheinberg A. (2003). Neural Mechanisms of Perceptual Organization. In Naoyuki Osaka (ed.), Neural Basis of Consciousness. John Benjamins.score: 60.0
  47. Austen Clark (2001). Some Logical Features of Feature Integration. In Werner Backhaus (ed.), Neuronal Coding of Perceptual Systems. World Scientific. 3-20.score: 54.0
    One of the biggest challenges in understanding perception is to understand how the nervous system manages to integrate the multiple codes it uses to represent features in multiple sensory modalities. From different cortical areas, which might separately register the sight of something red and the touch of something smooth, one effortlessly generates the perception of one thing that is both red and smooth. This process has been variously called "feature integration", "binding", or "synthesis". Citing some current models and (...)
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  48. Mark Augath, Integration of Touch and Sound in Auditory Cortex.score: 54.0
    To form a coherent percept of the environment, our brain combines information from different senses. Such multisensory integration occurs in higher association cortices; but supposedly, it also occurs in early sensory areas. Confirming the latter hypothesis, we unequivocally demonstrate supra-additive integration of touch and sound stimulation at the second stage of the auditory cortex. Using high-resolution fMRI of the macaque monkey, we quantified the integration of auditory broad-band noise and tactile stimulation of hand and foot in (...)
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  49. John Dempsher (1979). Integration of Function in the Nervous System — a New Theory. Acta Biotheoretica 28 (4).score: 54.0
    A new theory of synaptic function in the nervous system (Dempsher, 1978) is applied to the simplest system for integration of function in the nervous system. This system includes a sensory and motor neuron and three synaptic regions associated with those two neurons; a receptor region, an interneuronal spinal synaptic region linking the two neurons, and an effector region.Information is first received and processed at the receptor region. The processing consists of five components:1. A highly selective mechanism which (...)
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  50. Joost X. Maier, Multisensory Integration of Dynamic Faces and Voices in Rhesus Monkey Auditory Cortex.score: 54.0
    In the social world, multiple sensory channels are used concurrently to facilitate communication. Among human and nonhuman pri- mates, faces and voices are the primary means of transmitting social signals (Adolphs, 2003; Ghazanfar and Santos, 2004). Primates recognize the correspondence between species-specific facial and vocal expressions (Massaro, 1998; Ghazanfar and Logothetis, 2003; Izumi and Kojima, 2004), and these visual and auditory channels can be integrated into unified percepts to enhance detection and discrimination. Where and how such communication signals are (...)
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