Search results for 'Sentimentality' (try it on Scholar)

985 found
Sort by:
  1. Robert C. Solomon (2004). In Defense of Sentimentality. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Philosophy has as much to do with feelings as it does with thoughts and thinking. Philosophy, accordingly, requires not only emotional sensitivity but an understanding of the emotions, not as curious but marginal psychological phenomena but as the very substance of life. In this, the second book in a series devoted to his work on the emotions, Robert Solomon presents a defense of the emotions and of sentimentality against the background of what he perceives as a long history of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Scott Alexander Howard (2012). Lyrical Emotions and Sentimentality. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (248):546-568.score: 18.0
    I investigate the normative status of an unexamined category of emotions: ‘lyrical’ emotions about the transience of things. Lyrical emotions are often accused of sentimentality—a charge that expresses the idea that they are unfitting responses to their objects. However, when we test the merits of that charge using the standard model of emotion evaluation, a surprising problem emerges: it turns out that we cannot make normative distinctions between episodes of such feelings. Instead, it seems that lyrical emotions are always (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. K. Staples (2011). Statelessness, Sentimentality and Human Rights: A Critique of Rorty's Liberal Human Rights Culture. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (9):1011-1024.score: 18.0
    This article considers the ongoing difficulties for mainstream political theory of actualizing human rights, with particular reference to Rorty’s attempt to transcend their liberal foundations. It argues that there is a problematic disjuncture between his articulation of exclusion and his hope for inclusion via the expansion of the liberal human rights culture. More specifically, it shows that Rorty’s description of victimhood is based on premises unavailable to him, with the consequence that stateless persons are rendered inhuman, and, further, that his (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. John D. Witvliet (2008). “Sing to the Lord No Threadbare Song”: Theological Angularity in the Face of Advent Sentimentality. Interpretation 62 (4):402-417.score: 18.0
    To ward off Advent sentimentality, preachers and church musicians need to find theologically robust approaches to proclaiming the simultaneously sobering and glorious eschatological themes of Advent. Classical Christian doctrines, brought to life by theologically astute contemporary hymnwriters, offer many promising angles of vision for worshipers, preachers, teachers, and theologians.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Patrick Hayden (1999). Sentimentality and Human Rights. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 6 (3/4):59-66.score: 16.0
    Richard Rorty has recently argued that support for human rights ought to be cultivated in terms of a sentimental education which manipulates our emotions through detailed stories intended to produce feelings of sympathy and solidarity. Rorty contends that a sentimental education will be more effective in promoting respect for human rights than will a moral discourse grounded on rationality and universalism. In this paper, I critically examine Rorty’s proposal and argue that it fails to recognize the necessity of moral reasoning (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Robert C. Solomon (1991). On Kitsch and Sentimentality. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (1):1-14.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Sonali Chakravarti (2008). More Than "Cheap Sentimentality": Victim Testimony at Nuremberg, the Eichmann Trial, and Truth Commissions. Constellations 15 (2):223-235.score: 15.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Mark Jefferson (1983). What is Wrong with Sentimentality? Mind 92 (368):519-529.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Deborah Knight (1999). Why We Enjoy Condemning Sentimentality: A Meta-Aesthetic Perspective. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (4):411-420.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Michael Tanner (1976). Sentimentality. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 77:127 - 147.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. M. Tanner (2006). In Defense of Sentimentality. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (3):312-313.score: 15.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Joel Feinberg (1982). Sentiment and Sentimentality in Practical Ethics. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 56 (1):19 - 46.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Donald McKenna Moss & Erwin Straus (1980). Toward a Psychology and Psychopathology of Sentimentality. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 11 (1):111-115.score: 15.0
  14. Mary Midgley (1979). Brutality and Sentimentality. Philosophy 54 (209):385 - 389.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. David Wilson & William Dixon (2009). Sentimentality, Communicative Action and the Social Self: Adam Smith Meets Jürgen Habermas. History of the Human Sciences 22 (3):75-99.score: 15.0
    There is a long and tortuous history of misinterpreting Smithian social theory. After rehearsing that history we offer here a way of understanding Smith that, unlike much of recent revisionist Smith scholarship, does not further add to this confusion. Our proposal is to understand the relation between moral and economic behaviour in Smith as analogous to the way in which Habermas makes strategic (and normatively oriented) behaviour parasitic on a more basic communicative competence. Given this analogy, it is ironic that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. S. L. Feagin (2007). Review: In Defense of Sentimentality. [REVIEW] Mind 116 (461):225-228.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Marquard Smith (2002). Cold Sentimentality: Eroticism, Death, and Technology. Angelaki 7 (2):187 – 196.score: 15.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Rick Anthony Furtak (2002). Poetics of Sentimentality. Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):207-215.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Rick Anthony Furtak (2005). Review of Robert C. Solomon, In Defense of Sentimentality. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (10).score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Michael D. Burke & Terence J. Roberts (1997). Drugs in Sport: An Issue of Morality or Sentimentality? Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 24 (1):99-113.score: 15.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Anthony Savile (2008). Sentimentality. In Alex Neill & Aaron Ridley (eds.), Arguing About Art: Contemporary Philosophical Debates. Routledge. 223--227.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Bardwell Smith (2001). In Contrast to Sentimentality: Buddhist and Christian Sobriety. Buddhist-Christian Studies 21 (1):57-62.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Erwin Straus & Donald McKenna Moss (1980). Toward a Psychology and Psychopathology of Sentimentality. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 11 (1):111-115.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Lauren Gail Berlant (2008). The Female Complaint: The Unfinished Business of Sentimentality in American Culture. Duke University Press.score: 15.0
    Poor Eliza -- Pax Americana : the case of Show boat -- National brands, national body : Imitation of life -- Uncle Sam needs a wife : citizenship and denegation -- Remembering love, forgetting everything else : Now, voyager -- "It's not the tragedies that kill us, it's the messes" : femininity, formalism, and Dorothy Parker -- The compulsion to repeat femininity : Landscape for a good woman and The life and loves of a she-devil.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Tobias Menely (2007). Zoöphilpsychosis: Why Animals Are What's Wrong with Sentimentality. Symploke 15 (1):244-267.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Mark Reinhardt (2000). Constitutional Sentimentality. Theory and Event 4 (1).score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Hr Swardson (1986). Sentimentality in Teaching. Philosophical Forum 17 (3):217-241.score: 15.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Florian Cova & Julien Deonna (2013). Being Moved. Philosophical Studies (3):1-20.score: 9.0
    In this paper, we argue that, barring a few important exceptions, the phenomenon we refer to using the expression “being moved” is a distinct type of emotion. In this paper’s first section, we motivate this hypothesis by reflecting on our linguistic use of this expression. In section two, pursuing a methodology that is both conceptual and empirical, we try to show that the phenomenon satisfies the five most commonly used criteria in philosophy and psychology for thinking that some affective episode (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Robert Sparrow (2002). The March of the Robot Dogs. Ethics and Information Technology 4 (4):305-318.score: 9.0
    Following the success of Sony Corporation’s “AIBO”, robot cats and dogs are multiplying rapidly. “Robot pets” employing sophisticated artificial intelligence and animatronic technologies are now being marketed as toys and companions by a number of large consumer electronics corporations. -/- It is often suggested in popular writing about these devices that they could play a worthwhile role in serving the needs of an increasingly aging and socially isolated population. Robot companions, shaped like familiar household pets, could comfort and entertain lonely (...)
    Direct download (21 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Russell Blackford (2012). Robots and Reality: A Reply to Robert Sparrow. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 14 (1):41-51.score: 9.0
    We commonly identify something seriously defective in a human life that is lived in ignorance of important but unpalatable truths. At the same time, some degree of misapprehension of reality may be necessary for individual health and success. Morally speaking, it is unclear just how insistent we should be about seeking the truth. Robert Sparrow has considered such issues in discussing the manufacture and marketing of robot ‘pets’, such as Sony’s doglike ‘AIBO’ toy and whatever more advanced devices may supersede (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Eric Vogelstein (2011). Morality, Reasons, and Sentiments. Philosophical Studies 155 (3):421-432.score: 8.0
    Morality is commonly thought to be normative in a robust and important way. This is commonly cashed out in terms of normative reasons. It is also commonly thought that morality is necessarily and universally normative, i.e., that moral reasons are reasons for any possible moral agent. Taking these commonplaces for granted, I argue for a novel view of moral normativity. I challenge the standard view that moral reasons are reasons to act. I suggest that moral reasons are reasons for having (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Jianliang Xu (2009). The Universal Sentiment of Daoist Morality. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (4):524-536.score: 8.0
    Daoism has often been misunderstood as moral nihilism or anti-moralism, but the true Daoism indeed adopts a positive attitude towards morality. At the foundation of its universal sentiment is an affirmation of morality. Daoism takes all things as the starting point of its values in moral philosophy, and ziran 自然 (sponstaneously so) as the foundation of its philosophy with the universal commitment. Daoism hopes to use “ Dao to create the best environment for survival, and to fulfill individual responsibility for (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Guy Fletcher (2009). On Hatzimoysis on Sentimental Value. Philosophia 37 (1):149-152.score: 8.0
    Despite its apparent ubiquity, philosophers have not talked much about sentimental value. One exception is Anthony Hatzimoysis (The Philosophical Quarterly 53:373–379, 2003). Those who wish to take sentimental value seriously are likely to make use of Christine Korsgaard’s ideas on two distinctions in value. In this paper I show that Hatzimoysis has misrendered Korsgaard’s insight in his discussion of sentimental value. I begin by briefly summarising Korsgaard’s idea before showing how Hatzimoysis’ treatment of it is mistaken.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. John Tsalikis & Bruce Seaton (2006). Business Ethics Index: Measuring Consumer Sentiments Toward Business Ethical Practices. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 64 (4):317 - 326.score: 8.0
    The present study describes the development of an ongoing and systematic index to measure consumers’ sentiments towards business ethical practices. The Business Ethics Index (BEI) is based on the well established measurements of consumer sentiments, namely the ICS (Index of Consumer Sentiment) and CBCCI (Conference Board Consumer Confidence Index). The BEI is comprised of 4 measurements representing the dimensions of “personal-vicarious” and “past-future.” Data from 503 telephone interviews were used to calculate a BEI of 107. This indicates an overall positive (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. James Scott Johnston (2008). Does a Sentiment-Based Ethics of Caring Improve Upon a Principles-Based One? The Problem of Impartial Morality. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (3):436–452.score: 8.0
    My task in this paper is to demonstrate, contra Nel Noddings, that Kantian ethics does not have an expectation of treating those closest to one the same as one would a stranger. In fact, Kantian ethics has what I would consider a robust statement of how it is that those around us come to figure prominently in the development of one's ethics. To push the point even further, I argue that Kantian ethics has an even stronger claim to treating those (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Lívia Guimarães (2005). Reason and Sentiment in Hume’s Moral Theory. Doispontos 1 (2).score: 8.0
    My main goal in this paper is to vindicate Hume’s belief that morality is exclusively a matter of sentiment, when it is apparent that the reflective or general perspective necessary to making a moral judgment requires reason. My solution to the supposed inconsistency is to show that reason is understood in two ways: in the preliminary understanding, reason is opposed to sentiment; in the final understanding, reason is actually reduced to sentiment, or explained away in favor of it. In this (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Antoine C. Dussault (2013). In Search of Ecocentric Sentiments: Insights From the CAD Model in Moral Psychology. Environmental Ethics 35 (4):419-437.score: 8.0
    One aspect of J. Baird Callicott’s foundational project for ecocentrism consists in explaining how moral consideration for ecological wholes can be grounded in moral sentiments. Some critics of Callicott have objected that moral consideration for ecological wholes is impossible under a sentimentalist conception of ethics because, on both Hume and Smith’s views, sympathy is our main moral sentiment and it cannot be elicited by holistic entities. This conclusion is premature. The relevant question is not whether such moral consideration is compatible (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Ishtiyaque Haji (2003). Determinism and its Threat to the Moral Sentiments. The Monist 86 (2):242-260.score: 7.0
  39. Balihar Sanghera, Mehrigiul Ablezova & Aisalkyn Botoeva (2011). Everyday Morality in Families and a Critique of Social Capital: An Investigation Into Moral Judgements, Responsibilities, and Sentiments in Kyrgyzstani Households. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 40 (2):167-190.score: 7.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Jean-françois Goubet (2014). L'éducation à la Démocratie Par la Culture des Sentiments. Martha C. Nussbaum Et la Philosophie Pour enfantsTraining for Democracy Through Culture of Feelings. Martha C. Nussbaum and Philosophy for Children. [REVIEW] Childhood and Philosophy 10 (19):87-108.score: 7.0
    Dans un ouvrage récent, Not for Profit, Martha C. Nussbaum a pris fait et cause pour la philosophie pour enfants (Philosophy for Children, P4C). En fait, ce renvoi n’est pas isolé car de nombreux échanges entre Nussbaum et Matthew Lipman ont existé. Dans cet article, je ne m’intéresse pas aux citations de l’un à l’autre mais pars de l’œuvre de Nussbaum pour esquisser ce qu’il en est de l’éducation à la démocratie. Pour commencer, je rappelle la théorie des « capabilités (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. X. U. Jianliang (2009). The Universal Sentiment of Daoist Morality. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (4):524-536.score: 7.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. David I. Waddington (2010). Troublesome Sentiments: The Origins of Dewey's Antipathy to Children's Imaginative Activities. Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (4):351-364.score: 7.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Jan Deckers (2009). Vegetarianism, Sentimental or Ethical? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (6):573-597.score: 6.0
    In this paper, I provide some evidence for the view that a common charge against those who adopt vegetarianism is that they would be sentimental. I argue that this charge is pressed frequently by those who adopt moral absolutism, a position that I reject, before exploring the question if vegetarianism might make sense. I discuss three concerns that might motivate those who adopt vegetarian diets, including a concern with the human health and environmental costs of some alternative diets, a concern (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. C. E. Emmer (1998). Kitsch Against Modernity. Art Criticism 13 (1):53-80.score: 6.0
    "The writer discusses the concept of kitsch. Having reviewed a variety of approaches to kitsch, he posits an historical conception of it, connecting it to modernity and defining it as a coping-mechanism for modernity. He thus suggests that kitsch is best understood as a tool in the struggle against the particular stresses of the modern world and that it uses materials at hand, fashioning from them some sort of stability largely through projecting images of nature, stasis, and continuity. He discusses (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Fritz Allhoff (2009). The Evolution of the Moral Sentiments and the Metaphysics of Morals. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (1):97 - 114.score: 6.0
    So-called evolutionary error theorists, such as Michael Ruse and Richard Joyce, have argued that naturalistic accounts of the moral sentiments lead us to adopt an error theory approach to morality. Roughly, the argument is that an appreciation of the etiology of those sentiments undermines any reason to think that they track moral truth and, furthermore, undermines any reason to think that moral truth actually exists. I argue that this approach offers us a false dichotomy between error theory and some form (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. R. Jay Wallace (1996). Responsibility and the Moral Sentiments. Harvard University Press.score: 6.0
    R. Jay Wallace argues in this book that moral accountability hinges on questions of fairness: When is it fair to hold people morally responsible for what they do? Would it be fair to do so even in a deterministic world? To answer these questions, we need to understand what we are doing when we hold people morally responsible, a stance that Wallace connects with a central class of moral sentiments, those of resentment, indignation, and guilt. To hold someone responsible, he (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Rachel Cohon (2012). Hume's Moral Sentiments As Motives. Hume Studies 36 (2):193-213.score: 6.0
    There is considerable evidence that Hume thinks the moral sentiments (approval and disapproval) move us to action, at least in some circumstances. For one thing, he relies on the premise that moral evaluations move us to action to argue that moral evaluations are not derived from reason alone, in his most famous anti-rationalist argument. Presumably, this capacity of moral evaluations can be explained by the fact that (as Hume sees it) such evaluations are, or are the product of, moral sentiments. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Shaun Nichols (2004). Sentimental Rules: On the Natural Foundations of Moral Judgment. Oxford University Press.score: 6.0
    Sentimental Rules is an ambitious and highly interdisciplinary work, which proposes and defends a new theory about the nature and evolution of moral judgment. In it, philosopher Shaun Nichols develops the theory that emotions play a critical role in both the psychological and the cultural underpinnings of basic moral judgment. Nichols argues that our norms prohibiting the harming of others are fundamentally associated with our emotional responses to those harms, and that such 'sentimental rules' enjoy an advantage in cultural evolution, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Robert Fudge (2009). Sympathy, Beauty, and Sentiment: Adam Smith's Aesthetic Morality. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 7 (2):133-146.score: 6.0
    One of the more striking aspects of Adam Smith's moral theory is the degree to which it depends on and appeals to aesthetic norms. By considering what Smith says about judgments of propriety – the foundational type of judgment in his system – and by tying what he says in The Theory of Moral Sentiments to certain of his other writings, I argue that Smith ultimately defends an aesthetic morality. Among the challenges that any aesthetic morality faces is that it (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Paul Russell (1995). Freedom and Moral Sentiment: Hume's Way of Naturalizing Responsibility. Oxford University Press.score: 6.0
    In this book, Russell examines Hume's notion of free will and moral responsibility. It is widely held that Hume presents us with a classic statement of a compatibilist position--that freedom and responsibility can be reconciled with causation and, indeed, actually require it. Russell argues that this is a distortion of Hume's view, because it overlooks the crucial role of moral sentiment in Hume's picture of human nature. Hume was concerned to describe the regular mechanisms which generate moral sentiments such as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 985