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Profile: Serena Parekh (Northeastern University)
  1. Serena Parekh (2014). Beyond the Ethics of Admission Stateless People, Refugee Camps and Moral Obligations. Philosophy and Social Criticism 40 (7):645-663.
    This article examines our moral obligations to refugees and stateless people. I argue that in order to understand our moral obligations to stateless people, both de jure refugees and de facto stateless people, we ought to reconceptualize the harm of statelessness as entailing both a legal/political harm (the loss of citizenship) and an ontological harm, a deprivation of certain fundamental human qualities. To do this, I draw on the work of Hannah Arendt and show that the ontological deprivation has three (...)
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  2. Serena Parekh (2013). Hannah Arendt and Global Justice. Philosophy Compass 8 (9):771-780.
    This essay explores recent scholarship on Hannah Arendt's contribution to the field of global justice. I show that many of Arendt's ideas have been brought to bear fruitfully on some of the most pressing global issues of our day. I turn first to the area in which Arendt has, arguably, been most influential, namely human right. I then look at recent scholarship on Arendt and various issues in global justice, including immigration, statelessness, human security, global poverty, political reconciliation, and global (...)
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  3. Serena Parekh (2013). Reconciling with Heidegger Friendship, Disappointment and Love in the Wake of the Controversy. Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (9):885-892.
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  4. Serena Parekh (2013). Taking Hold of Life: Liberal Eugenics, Autonomy, and Biopower. In S. Campbell & P. Bruno (eds.), The Science, Politics, and Ontology of Life-Philosophy. Bloomsbury. 157.
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  5. Serena Parekh (2012). Does Ordinary Injustice Make Extraordinary Injustice Possible? Gender, Structural Injustice, and the Ethics of Refugee Determination. Journal of Global Ethics 8 (2-3):269-281.
    Our understanding of the impact of gender on refugee determination has evolved greatly over the last 60 years. Though many people initially believed that women could not be persecuted qua women, it is now frequently recognized that certain forms of gender-related persecution are sufficient to warrant asylum. Yet despite this conceptual progress, many states are still reluctant to consider certain forms of gender-related persecution to be sufficient to warrant asylum or refugee status. One reason for this continued bias is the (...)
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  6. Serena Parekh (2011). Between Community and Humanity: Arendt, Judgment, and Responsibility to the Global Poor. Philosophical Topics 39 (2):145-163.
    I argue in this paper that Hannah Arendt can make a valuable contribution to the debate over global justice and our obligations to the global poor. I maintain that Arendt's work helps us to see how we might be able to combine the best impulses of both partialists and impartialists, and find a middle ground between taking seriously the importance of community as a human good, and the pressing ethical demands of noncitizens. I demonstrate that throughout her corpus, we see (...)
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  7. Serena Parekh (2011). Getting to the Root of Gender Inequality: Structural Injustice and Political Responsibility. Hypatia 26 (4):672-689.
    In this paper, I argue that there is a philosophical basis for the claim that states can be held responsible for structural injustices such as gender discrimination and violence—a claim that has been made in international human rights documents, but one that has not gained much normative force. To show this, I draw on and develop Iris Young's notion of “political responsibility.” The purpose of political responsibility is not to find fault or blame the state for a past wrong, but (...)
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  8. Serena Parekh (2010). Review of Jason D. Hill, Beyond Blood Identities: Posthumanity in the Twenty-First Century. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (6).
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  9. Serena Parekh (2008). Care and Human Rights in a Globalized World. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (S1):104-110.
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  10. Serena Parekh (2008). Comments: Care and Human Rights in a Globalized World. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (Supplement):104-110.
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  11. Serena Parekh (2008). Hannah Arendt and the Challenge of Modernity: A Phenomenology of Human Rights. Routledge.
    Hannah Arendt and The Phenomenology of Human Rights examines contemporary debates on the foundations of human rights through the lens of Arendt's writings, showing how Arendt’s phenomenological standpoint, unique within these debates, is able to shed new light a number of problems within human rights theory.
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  12. Lynne S. Arnault, Bat-Ami Bar On, Alyssa R. Bernstein, Victoria Davion, Marilyn Fischer, Virginia Held, Peter Higgins, Sabrina Hom, Audra King, James L. Nelson, Serena Parekh, April Shaw & Joan Tronto (2007). Global Feminist Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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