8 found
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Sergey V. Blok [3]Sergey Blok [3]Serge Blok [2]
  1.  6
    Douglas L. Medin, Norbert O. Ross, Scott Atran, Douglas Cox, John Coley, Julia B. Proffitt & Sergey Blok (2006). Folkbiology of Freshwater Fish. Cognition 99 (3):237-273.
  2.  15
    Arthur B. Markman, Sergey Blok, Kyungil Kim, Levi Larkey, Lisa R. Narvaez, C. Hunt Stilwell & Eric Taylor (2005). Digging Beneath Rules and Similarity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):29-30.
    Pothos suggests dispensing with the distinction between rules and similarity, without defining what is meant by either term. We agree that there are problems with the distinction between rules and similarity, but believe these will be solved only by exploring the representations and processes underlying cases purported to involve rules and similarity.
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  3.  25
    George E. Newman, Sergey V. Blok & Lance J. Rips (2006). Beliefs in Afterlife as a by-Product of Persistence Judgments. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):480-481.
    We agree that supernatural beliefs are pervasive. However, we propose a more general account rooted in how people trace ordinary objects over time. Tracking identity involves attending to the causal history of an object, a process that may implicate hidden mechanisms. We discuss experiments in which participants exhibit the same “supernatural” beliefs when reasoning about the fates of cups and automobiles as those exhibited by Bering's participants when reasoning about spirits.
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  4. Lance J. Rips, Sergey Blok & George Newman (2006). Tracing the Identity of Objects. Psychological Review 113 (1):1-30.
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  5.  9
    Arthur B. Markman, Serge Blok, John Dennis, Micah Goldwater, Kyungil Kim, Jeff Laux, Lisa Narvaez & Jon Rein (2006). Money and Motivational Activation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):190-190.
    Different aspects of people's interactions with money are best conceptualized using the drug and tool theories. The key question is when these models of money are most likely to guide behavior. We suggest that the Drug Theory characterizes motivationally active uses of money and that the Tool Theory characterizes behavior in motivationally cool situations. (Published Online April 5 2006).
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  6.  6
    Arthur B. Markman, Serge Blok, John Dennis, Micah Goldwater, Kyungil Kim, Jeff Laux, Lisa Narvaez & Eric Taylor (2005). Culture and Individual Differences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):831-831.
    Tests of economic theory often focus on choice outcomes and find significant individual differences in these outcomes. This variability may mask universal psychological processes that lead to different choices because of differences across cultures in the information people have available when making decisions. On this view, decision making research within and across cultures must focus on the processes underlying choice.
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  7. Sergey V. Blok, George E. Newman & Lance J. Rips (2007). Out of Sorts? Some Remedies for Theories of Object Concepts: A Reply to Rhemtulla and Xu. Psychological Review 114 (4):1096-1102.
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  8. Sergey V. Blok, George E. Newman & Lance J. Rips (2007). Postscript: Sorting Out Object Persistence. Psychological Review 114 (4):1103-1104.
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