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  1. Hedwige Dehon, Valentine Vanootighem & Serge Brédart (2013). Verbal Overshadowing of Face Memory Does Occur in Children Too! Frontiers in Psychology 4:970.
    Verbal descriptions of unfamiliar faces have been found to impair later identification of these faces in adults, a phenomenon known as the “verbal overshadowing effect” (VOE). Although determining whether children are good at describing unfamiliar individuals and whether these descriptions impair their recognition performance is critical to gaining a better understanding children’s eyewitness ability, only a couple of studies have examined this dual issue in children and these found no evidence of VOE. However, as some methodological criticisms can be addressed (...)
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  2. Catherine Barsics & Serge Brédart (2011). Recalling Episodic Information About Personally Known Faces and Voices. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):303-308.
  3. Christel Devue & Serge Brédart (2011). The Neural Correlates of Visual Self-Recognition. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (1):40-51.
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  4. Christel Devue, Stefan Van der Stigchel, Serge Brédart & Jan Theeuwes (2009). You Do Not Find Your Own Face Faster; You Just Look at It Longer. Cognition 111 (1):114-122.
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  5. Audrey Vanhaudenhuyse, Marie-Aurelie Bruno, Serge Bredart, Alain Plenevaux & Steven Laureys (2007). The Challenge of Disentangling Reportability and Phenomenal Consciousness in Post-Comatose States. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5-6):529-530.
    Determining whether or not noncommunicative patients are phenomenally conscious is a major clinical and ethical challenge. Clinical assessment is usually limited to the observation of these patients' motor responses. Recent neuroimaging technology and brain computer interfaces help clinicians to assess whether patients are conscious or not, and to avoid diagnostic errors.
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  6. Fabien Perrin, Caroline Schnakers, Manuel Schabus, Christian Degueldre, Serge Goldman, Serge Brédart, Marie-Elisabeth E. Faymonville, Maurice Lamy, Gustave Moonen, André Luxen, Pierre Maquet & Steven Laureys (2006). Brain Response to One's Own Name in Vegetative State, Minimally Conscious State, and Locked-in Syndrome. Archives of Neurology 63 (4):562-569.
  7. Serge Brédart & Tim Valentine (1992). From Monroe to Moreau: An Analysis of Face Naming Errors. Cognition 45 (3):187-223.
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