Search results for 'Seth Duncan' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Seth Duncan & Lisa Feldman Barrett (2007). The Role of the Amygdala in Visual Awareness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (5):190-192.score: 240.0
  2. Seth Duncan & Lisa Feldman Barrett (2007). Affect is a Form of Cognition: A Neurobiological Analysis. Cognition and Emotion 21 (6):1184-1211.score: 240.0
  3. Andrew W. Young, Duncan Rowland, Andrew J. Calder, Nancy L. Etcoff, Anil Seth & David I. Perrett (1997). Facial Expression Megamix: Tests of Dimensional and Category Accounts of Emotion Recognition. Cognition 63 (3):271-313.score: 240.0
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  4. Dudley Duncan (1994). The Social Construction of the Senario and the Septimal Heresy: Response to Duncan. Sociological Theory 12 (3):319-327.score: 180.0
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  5. T. L. Duncan & J. S. Semura (2007). Information Loss as a Foundational Principle for the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Foundations of Physics 37 (12):1767-1773.score: 60.0
    In a previous paper (Duncan, T.L., Semura, J.S. in Entropy 6:21, 2004) we considered the question, “What underlying property of nature is responsible for the second law?” A simple answer can be stated in terms of information: The fundamental loss of information gives rise to the second law. This line of thinking highlights the existence of two independent but coupled sets of laws: Information dynamics and energy dynamics. The distinction helps shed light on certain foundational questions in statistical mechanics. (...)
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  6. Bruce Duncan (2014). Handbook of Research on Development and Religion [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 91 (1):124.score: 60.0
    Duncan, Bruce Review(s) of: Handbook of research on development and religion, edited by Matthew Clarke (Cheltenham UK: Edward Edgar, 2013), pp viii+ 602, hb, US$280.
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  7. Bruce Duncan (2014). Pope Francis's Call for Social Justice in the Global Economy. Australasian Catholic Record, The 91 (2):178.score: 60.0
    Duncan, Bruce Pope Francis sparked accusations that he is espousing Marxism in his November 2013 exhortation, The Joy of the Gospel, because of his pointed attacks on economic liberalism or neoliberalism, the ideology behind versions of free-market economics. The conservative US radio commentator, Rush Limbaugh, with a following of 20 million listeners on a program valued at $400 million, accused the Pope of sprouting 'pure Marxism', and of not knowing what he was talking about.
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  8. Stewart Duncan (2011). Hobbes, Signification, and Insignificant Names. Hobbes Studies 24 (2):158-178.score: 30.0
    The notion of signification is an important part of Hobbes's philosophy of language. It also has broader relevance, as Hobbes argues that key terms used by his opponents are insignificant. However Hobbes's talk about names' signification is puzzling, as he appears to have advocated conflicting views. This paper argues that Hobbes endorsed two different views of names' signification in two different contexts. When stating his theoretical views about signification, Hobbes claimed that names signify ideas. Elsewhere he talked as if words (...)
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  9. Stewart Duncan (2005). Hobbes's Materialism in the Early 1640s. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (3):437 – 448.score: 30.0
    I argue that Hobbes isn't really a materialist in the early 1640s (in, e.g., the Third Objections to Descartes's Meditations). That is, he doesn't assert that bodies are the only substances. However, he does think that bodies are the only substances we can think about using imagistic ideas.
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  10. Stewart Duncan, Hobbes on Language: Propositions, Truth, and Absurdity.score: 30.0
    Draft for Martinich and Hoekstra (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Hobbes. -/- Language was central to Hobbes's understanding of human beings and their mental abilities, and criticism of other philosophers' uses of language became a favorite critical tool for him. This paper connects Hobbes's theories about language to his criticisms of others' language, examining Hobbes's theories of propositions and truth, and how they relate to his claims that various sorts of proposition are absurd. It considers whether Hobbes in fact means anything (...)
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  11. Stewart Duncan (2010). Leibniz on Hobbes's Materialism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (1):11-18.score: 30.0
    I consider Leibniz's thoughts about Hobbes's materialism, focusing on his less-discussed later thoughts about the topic. Leibniz understood Hobbes to have argued for his materialism from his imagistic theory of ideas. Leibniz offered several criticisms of this argument and the resulting materialism itself. Several of these criticisms occur in texts in which Leibniz was engaging with the generation of British philosophers after Hobbes. Of particular interest is Leibniz's correspondence with Damaris Masham. Leibniz may have been trying to communicate with Locke, (...)
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  12. Stewart Duncan (2005). Knowledge of God in Leviathan. History of Philosophy Quarterly 22 (1):31-48.score: 30.0
    Hobbes denies in Leviathan that we have an idea of God. He does think, though, that God exists, and does not even deny that we can think about God, even though he says we have no idea of God. There is, Hobbes thinks, another cognitive mechanism by means of which we can think about God. That mechanism allows us only to think a few things about God though. This constrains what Hobbes can say about our knowledge of God, and grounds (...)
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  13. Steven M. Duncan, Kant's Critique of the Ontological Argument: FAIL.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I argue that Kant's famous critique of the Ontological Argument largely begs the question against that argument, and is no better when supplemented by the modern quantificational analysis of "exists." In particular, I argue that the claim, common to Hume and Kant, that conceptual truths can never entail substantive existential claims is false,and thus no ground for rejecting the Ontological Argument.
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  14. Stewart Duncan (2012). Debating Materialism: Cavendish, Hobbes, and More. History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (4):391-409.score: 30.0
    This paper discusses the materialist views of Margaret Cavendish, focusing on the relationships between her views and those of two of her contemporaries, Thomas Hobbes and Henry More. It argues for two main claims. First, Cavendish's views sit, often rather neatly, between those of Hobbes and More. She agreed with Hobbes on some issues and More on others, while carving out a distinctive alternative view. Secondly, the exchange between Hobbes, More, and Cavendish illustrates a more general puzzle about just what (...)
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  15. Stewart Duncan, Hobbes, Universal Names, and Nominalism.score: 30.0
    Thomas Hobbes was, rather famously, a nominalist. The core of that nominalism is the belief that the only universal things are universal names: there are no universal objects, or universal ideas. This paper looks at what Hobbes's views about universal names were, how they evolved over time, and how Hobbes argued for them. The remainder of the paper considers two objections to Hobbes's view: a criticism made by several of Hobbes's contemporaries, that Hobbes's view could not account for people saying (...)
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  16. Steven M. Duncan, Descartes' Refutation of Atheism: A Defense.score: 30.0
    Descartes argues that, apart from the existence of a veracious God, we can have no reason to believe that we possess reliable cognitive faculties, with the result that, if atheism is true, not even our seemingly most certain beliefs can count as knowledge for us. Since the atheist denies the existence of God, he or she will be precisely in this position. I argue that Descartes' argument is sound, and that atheism is therefore self-refuting.
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  17. Stewart Duncan, Toland and Locke in the Leibniz-Burnett Correspondence.score: 30.0
    Leibniz's correspondence with Thomas Burnett of Kemnay is probably best known for Leibniz's attempts to communicate with Locke via Burnett. But Burnett was also, more generally a source of English intellectual news for Leibniz. As such, Burnett provided an important part of the context in which Locke was presented to and understood by Leibniz. -/- This paper examines the Leibniz-Burnett correspondence, and argues against Jolley's suggestion that "the context in which Leibniz learned about Locke was primarily a theological one". That (...)
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  18. Steven M. Duncan, Descartes and the Crazy Argument.score: 30.0
    In Meditation I, Descartes dismisses the possibility that he might be insane as a ground for doubting that the senses are a source of knowledge of the external world. In this paper, I argue that Descartes was justified in so doing, and draw some general epistemological conclusions from this result.
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  19. Stewart Duncan (2012). Toland, Leibniz, and Active Matter. Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 6:249-78.score: 30.0
    In the early years of the eighteenth century Leibniz had several interactions with John Toland. These included, from 1702 to 1704, discussions of materialism. Those discussions culminated with the consideration of Toland's 1704 Letters to Serena, where Toland argued that matter is necessarily active. In this paper I argue for two main theses about this exchange and its consequences for our wider understanding. The first is that, despite many claims that Toland was at the time of Letters to Serena a (...)
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  20. Steven M. Duncan, The Inescapable Self.score: 30.0
    In this paper I discuss the existence of the substantial self and argue against those, like Hume, who deny its reality.
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  21. Stewart Duncan (2013). Materialism. In S. A. Lloyd (ed.), Bloomsbury Companion to Hobbes. Continuum.score: 30.0
    This is a short (1,000 word) introduction to Hobbes's materialism, covering (briefly) such issues as what the relevant notion of materialism is, Hobbes's debate with Descartes, and what Hobbes's arguments for materialism were.
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  22. Stewart Duncan (2009). Review of James R. Martel, Subverting the Leviathan. [REVIEW] Restoration, Studies in English Literary Culture, 1660-1700 33:57-9.score: 30.0
  23. Steven M. Duncan, Kant's Pre-Critical Proof for God's Existence.score: 30.0
    In his Beweisgrund (1762), Kant presents a sketch of "the only possible basis" for a proof of God's existence. In this essay, I attempt to present that proof as a valid and sound argument for the existence of God.
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  24. Stewart Duncan (2012). Leibniz's Mill Arguments Against Materialism. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (247):250-72.score: 30.0
    Leibniz's mill argument in 'Monadology' 17 is a well-known but puzzling argument against materialism about the mind. I approach the mill argument by considering other places where Leibniz gave similar arguments, using the same example of the machinery of a mill and reaching the same anti-materialist conclusion. In a 1702 letter to Bayle, Leibniz gave a mill argument that moves from his definition of perception (as the expression of a multitude by a simple) to the anti-materialist conclusion. Soon afterwards, in (...)
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  25. Steven M. Duncan, Having Faith in Reason.score: 30.0
    An Address delivered to the Seattle G. K. Chesterton Society at the University of Washington Newman Center, May 2, 2013.
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  26. Steven M. Duncan, Can I Know What I Am ThInking?score: 30.0
    In this paper, I argue that, if a common form of materialism is true, I cannot know my own thoughts, or even that I am thinking. I conclude that, since I can and do know these things, materialism about mind as I characterize it must be false.
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  27. Steven M. Duncan, The Consequences of Neurophysiological Materialism.score: 30.0
    In this essay, I argue that neurophysiological materialism - the thesis that all of our mental contents are caused by non-mental, purely physical brain states - is epistemically self-refuting, and ought to be rejected even if it cannot be otherwise disproved.
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  28. Steven M. Duncan, Happiness: A Preliminary Investigation.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I present the case for an objective, as opposed to subjective, conception of happiness along familiar, classical lines.
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  29. Steven M. Duncan, Possibilities That Matter I: Material Possibility.score: 30.0
    This is the first of a series of four papers presenting modal logic as a branch of material, rather than merely formal, logic.
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  30. Steven M. Duncan, Why There Can't Be a Self-Explanatory Series of Infinite Past Events.score: 30.0
    Based on a recently published essay by Jeremy Gwiazda, I argue that the possibility that the present state of the universe is the product of an actually infinite series of causally-ordered prior events is impossible in principle, and thus that a major criticism of the Secunda Via of St. Thomas is baseless after all.
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  31. Steven M. Duncan, Mind, Body, Space, and Time.score: 30.0
    In this essay I explore some of the basic elements of consciousness from a substance dualist point of view, incorporating some elements of Kant's Transcendental Analytic into an overall account of the constitution of consciousness.
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  32. Anil K. Seth, Bernard J. Baars & D. B. Edelman (2005). Criteria for Consciousness in Humans and Other Mammals. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):119-39.score: 30.0
    The standard behavioral index for human consciousness is the ability to report events with accuracy. While this method is routinely used for scientific and medical applications in humans, it is not easy to generalize to other species. Brain evidence may lend itself more easily to comparative testing. Human consciousness involves widespread, relatively fast low-amplitude interactions in the thalamocortical core of the brain, driven by current tasks and conditions. These features have also been found in other mammals, which suggests that consciousness (...)
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  33. Steven M. Duncan (2010). Seeing Other Minds. Seattle Critical Review (on Line) 1 (1):1-30.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I offer an account of our knowledge of other minds based on V. C. Aldrich's account of aesthetic perception, according to which there is a sense in which we literally see other minds.
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  34. Craig Duncan, Torture: Foolish and Wrong.score: 30.0
    In all likelihood, the Bush Administration’s aim is to continue abusive interrogation methods that on any reasonable definition amount to torture (methods such as waterboarding,” for example, in which a detainee is laid on his back and choked with water until he believes he is drowning). This new law, however, is both foolish and immoral: foolish, because torture won’t make Americans safer; and immoral, because torture is the grossest of affronts to human dignity.
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  35. Steven M. Duncan, Determinism and Luck.score: 30.0
    In the course of writing a book on Free Will, I took the opportunity to read a good deal of contemporary literature on the Free Will problem. This paper is a survey and reflection on that reading, responding to the current trends and state of play concerning the existence of free will.
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  36. Steven M. Duncan, Can a Christian Be a Mycologist?score: 30.0
    I agree with about 95% of what Paul Moser has written in his book The Elusive God. However, I have three main points of disagreement with Moser, two of which I ventilate in this paper. The third I discuss in my paper "What's Love Got to Do with It?" also on this website.
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  37. Steven M. Duncan, Desire, Love, and Happiness.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I explore the concept of happiness by relating it to those of desire, pleasure, and love, arriving at the classical view that objective happiness consists in the possession and enjoyment of the good.
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  38. Steven M. Duncan, Possibilities That Matter II: Material Contingency and Sufficient Reason.score: 30.0
    This is the second of a series of papers inspired by a paper I wrote around 1989. In this paper, I consider the notion of material contingency and relate it to the traditional, metaphysically loaded Principle of Sufficient Reason.
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  39. Steven M. Duncan, God is NOT Hidden.score: 30.0
    In this paper I argue that there is no problem of Divine Hiddenness for Christians and offer an alternate explanation for the widespread claim that God's existence is hidden based on the Christian doctrine of Original Sin.
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  40. Steven M. Duncan, Toward a Kantian Ethics of Belief.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I discuss the Categorical Imperative as a basis for an Ethics of Belief and its application to Kant's own project in his theoretical philosophy.
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  41. Steven M. Duncan, The Burning Bush.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I present some ruminations on Hume's argument from miracles and the distorted view of rationality that it reflects (along with religious skepticism generally) contrasting it with what I take to be a better account of rationality, one more sympathetic - at least less hostile - to religious claims.
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  42. Stewart Duncan (2009). Hume and a Worry About Simplicity. History of Philosophy Quarterly 26 (2):139-157.score: 30.0
    I discuss Hume's views about whether simplicity and generality are positive features of explanations. In criticizing Hobbes and others who base their systems of morality on self interest, Hume diagnoses their errors as resulting from a "love of simplicity". These worries about whether simplicity is a positive feature of explanations emerge in Hume's thinking over time. But Hume does not completely reject the idea that it's good to seek simple explanations. What Hume thinks we need is good judgment about when (...)
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  43. Anil K. Seth & Bernard J. Baars (2005). Neural Darwinism and Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):140-168.score: 30.0
    Neural Darwinism (ND) is a large scale selectionist theory of brain development and function that has been hypothesized to relate to consciousness. According to ND, consciousness is entailed by reentrant interactions among neuronal populations in the thalamocortical system (the ‘dynamic core’). These interactions, which permit high-order discriminations among possible core states, confer selective advantages on organisms possessing them by linking current perceptual events to a past history of value-dependent learning. Here, we assess the consistency of ND with 16 widely recognized (...)
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  44. Steven M. Duncan, Possibilities That Matter III: Materially Necessary Being.score: 30.0
    This is the third in a series of papers on material modality, which explores the concept of a materially necessary being and argues that such a being exists.
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  45. Steven M. Duncan, Compendium Metaphysicae.score: 30.0
    Recently, I was reading Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: Background Source Materials, and read selections from Wolff, Baumgarten, Crusius, and Kant's own teacher, Martin Knutzen. It was dope - real philosophical comfort food - and inspired this piece, written in the style of one of their textbooks.
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  46. Steven M. Duncan, Could Introspection Be Unreliable - Even in Principle?score: 30.0
    I argue that, despite claims that might be made to the contrary, no scientific evidence could ever prove that introspection is unreliable, even in principle. This paper was read at the annual POH symposium in Lake Wenatchee in May, 2011.
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  47. Steven M. Duncan, How is Neuroscience Possible?score: 30.0
    In this paper, I argue that neuroscience not only is not complemented, but rather is positively undermined, by the substantive commitments of materialist philosophers of mind. Thus, we can have neuroscience or "neurophilosophy" but not both. Since neuroscience is a real science, to the extent that it is in tension with materialistic neurophilosophy, the latter should be abandoned and the former retained.
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  48. Stewart Duncan (2006). Review of Tom Sorell and Luc Foisneau (Ed.), Leviathan After 350 Years. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 56:614-6.score: 30.0
  49. Steven M. Duncan, Possibilities That Matter IV: The Ground of All Possibilities.score: 30.0
    This is the final paper in the Possibilities that Matter series and attempts to complete the project of constructing a material interpretation of modal logic.
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  50. Stewart Duncan & Antonia LoLordo (eds.) (2013). Debates in Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings and Contemporary Responses. Routledge.score: 30.0
    Debates in Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings and Contemporary Responses provides an in-depth, engaging introduction to important issues in modern philosophy. It presents 13 key interpretive debates to students, and ranges in coverage from Descartes' Meditations to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. -/- Debates include: -/- Did Descartes have a developed and consistent view about how the mind interacts with the body? Was Leibniz an idealist, or did he believe in corporeal substances? What is Locke's theory of personal identity? Could there (...)
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