Search results for 'Seth Duncan' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  11
    Seth Duncan & Lisa Feldman Barrett (2007). Affect is a Form of Cognition: A Neurobiological Analysis. Cognition and Emotion 21 (6):1184-1211.
  2.  6
    Andrew W. Young, Duncan Rowland, Andrew J. Calder, Nancy L. Etcoff, Anil Seth & David I. Perrett (1997). Facial Expression Megamix: Tests of Dimensional and Category Accounts of Emotion Recognition. Cognition 63 (3):271-313.
  3.  49
    Seth Duncan & Lisa Feldman Barrett (2007). The Role of the Amygdala in Visual Awareness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (5):190-192.
  4.  10
    Dudley Duncan (1994). The Social Construction of the Senario and the Septimal Heresy: Response to Duncan. Sociological Theory 12 (3):319-327.
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  5. John Duncan, Alice Parr, Alexandra Woolgar, Russell Thompson, Peter Bright, Sally Cox, Sonia Bishop & Ian Nimmo-Smith (2008). "Goal Neglect and Spearman's G: Competing Parts of a Complex Task": Correction to Duncan Et Al. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 137 (2):261-261.
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  6. Giuseppe Rensi & James Seth (1916). Tipi Odierni di Etica Inglese: La Morale Dell''attrazione Dell'io' [J.] Seth [a Study of Ethical Principles] E Wright.
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  7.  78
    T. L. Duncan & J. S. Semura (2007). Information Loss as a Foundational Principle for the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Foundations of Physics 37 (12):1767-1773.
    In a previous paper (Duncan, T.L., Semura, J.S. in Entropy 6:21, 2004) we considered the question, “What underlying property of nature is responsible for the second law?” A simple answer can be stated in terms of information: The fundamental loss of information gives rise to the second law. This line of thinking highlights the existence of two independent but coupled sets of laws: Information dynamics and energy dynamics. The distinction helps shed light on certain foundational questions in statistical mechanics. (...)
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  8. Craig Duncan, Tibor R. Machan & Martha Nussbaum (2005). Libertarianism: For and Against. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Libertarianism: For and Against offers dueling perspectives on the scope of legitimate government. Tibor R. Machan, a well-known libertarian philosopher, argues for a minimal government devoted solely to protecting individual rights to life, liberty, and property. Against this view, philosopher Craig Duncan defends democratic liberalism, which aims to ensure that all citizens have fair access to a life of dignity. In a dynamic exchange of arguments, the two philosophers cut to the heart of this important debate.
     
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  9.  6
    Bruce Duncan (2015). Islam, Peacemaking and Terrorism. Australasian Catholic Record, The 92 (2):204.
    Duncan, Bruce The continuing threat from Islamist terrorists, now not just in Africa or the Middle East, but virtually anywhere their appeal may reach, has shocked the world. The atrocities involve mass killing not just of military prisoners but of innocent men, women and children belonging to different faiths, including Muslims opposed to their militant practices and beliefs.
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  10.  8
    Sanjay Seth (1993). Political Theory in the Age of Nationalism. Ethics and International Affairs 7 (1):75–96.
    Seth suggests that the transformation of the international system from a system of states to a system of nation-states has had profound consequences for international relations, consequences not fully grasped in international relations theory.
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  11.  3
    Bruce Duncan (2014). Pope Francis's Call for Social Justice in the Global Economy. Australasian Catholic Record, The 91 (2):178.
    Duncan, Bruce Pope Francis sparked accusations that he is espousing Marxism in his November 2013 exhortation, The Joy of the Gospel, because of his pointed attacks on economic liberalism or neoliberalism, the ideology behind versions of free-market economics. The conservative US radio commentator, Rush Limbaugh, with a following of 20 million listeners on a program valued at $400 million, accused the Pope of sprouting 'pure Marxism', and of not knowing what he was talking about.
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  12.  2
    Bruce Duncan (2014). Handbook of Research on Development and Religion [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 91 (1):124.
    Duncan, Bruce Review(s) of: Handbook of research on development and religion, edited by Matthew Clarke (Cheltenham UK: Edward Edgar, 2013), pp viii+ 602, hb, US$280.
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  13. Vanita Seth (2010). Europe's Indians: Producing Racial Difference, 1500–1900. Duke University Press Books.
    _Europe’s Indians_ forces a rethinking of key assumptions regarding difference—particularly racial difference—and its centrality to contemporary social and political theory. Tracing shifts in European representations of two different colonial spaces, the New World and India, from the late fifteenth century through the late nineteenth, Vanita Seth demonstrates that the classification of humans into racial categories or binaries of self–other is a product of modernity. Part historical, part philosophical, and part a history of science, her account exposes the epistemic conditions (...)
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  14. Vanita Seth (2010). Europe's Indians: Producing Racial Difference, 1500–1900. Duke University Press Books.
    _Europe’s Indians_ forces a rethinking of key assumptions regarding difference—particularly racial difference—and its centrality to contemporary social and political theory. Tracing shifts in European representations of two different colonial spaces, the New World and India, from the late fifteenth century through the late nineteenth, Vanita Seth demonstrates that the classification of humans into racial categories or binaries of self–other is a product of modernity. Part historical, part philosophical, and part a history of science, her account exposes the epistemic conditions (...)
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  15.  29
    Zoltán Dienes & Anil Seth (2010). Gambling on the Unconscious: A Comparison of Wagering and Confidence Ratings as Measures of Awareness in an Artificial Grammar Task☆. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):674-681.
    We explore three methods for measuring the conscious status of knowledge using the artificial grammar learning paradigm. We show wagering is no more sensitive to conscious knowledge than simple verbal confidence reports but is affected by risk aversion. When people wager rather than give verbal confidence they are less ready to indicate high confidence. We introduce a “no-loss gambling” method which is insensitive to risk aversion. We show that when people are just as ready to bet on a genuine random (...)
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  16.  60
    R. Desimone & J. Duncan (1995). Neural Mechanisms of Selective Visual Attention. Annual Review of Neuroscience 18 (1):193-222.
  17. Anil K. Seth, Zoltan Dienes, Axel Cleeremans, Morten Overgaard & Luiz Pessoa (2008). Measuring Consciousness: Relating Behavioural and Neurophysiological Approaches. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (8):314-321.
  18. Anil K. Seth, Bernard J. Baars & D. B. Edelman (2005). Criteria for Consciousness in Humans and Other Mammals. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):119-39.
    The standard behavioral index for human consciousness is the ability to report events with accuracy. While this method is routinely used for scientific and medical applications in humans, it is not easy to generalize to other species. Brain evidence may lend itself more easily to comparative testing. Human consciousness involves widespread, relatively fast low-amplitude interactions in the thalamocortical core of the brain, driven by current tasks and conditions. These features have also been found in other mammals, which suggests that consciousness (...)
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  19.  9
    A. Seth (2008). Post-Decision Wagering Measures Metacognitive Content, Not Sensory Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):981-983.
    A recent report by Persaud et al. [Persaud, N., McLeod, P. & Cowey, A. . Post-decision wagering objectively measures awareness. Nature Neuroscience 10, 257–261] addresses a fundamental issue in consciousness science: the experimental measurement of conscious content. The authors propose a novel technique, ‘post-decision wagering’, in which subjects place bets on the correctness of decisions or discriminations. In this note, I critique the authors’ claim that their method “measures awareness directly”.
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  20. D. B. Edelman, Bernard J. Baars & Anil K. Seth (2005). Identifying Hallmarks of Consciousness in Non-Mammalian Species. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):169-87.
    Most early studies of consciousness have focused on human subjects. This is understandable, given that humans are capable of reporting accurately the events they experience through language or by way of other kinds of voluntary response. As researchers turn their attention to other animals, “accurate report” methodologies become increasingly difficult to apply. Alternative strategies for amassing evidence for consciousness in non-human species include searching for evolutionary homologies in anatomical substrates and measurement of physiological correlates of conscious states. In addition, creative (...)
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  21. Anil K. Seth & Bernard J. Baars (2005). Neural Darwinism and Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):140-168.
    Neural Darwinism (ND) is a large scale selectionist theory of brain development and function that has been hypothesized to relate to consciousness. According to ND, consciousness is entailed by reentrant interactions among neuronal populations in the thalamocortical system (the ‘dynamic core’). These interactions, which permit high-order discriminations among possible core states, confer selective advantages on organisms possessing them by linking current perceptual events to a past history of value-dependent learning. Here, we assess the consistency of ND with 16 widely recognized (...)
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  22. Stewart Duncan (2012). Leibniz's Mill Arguments Against Materialism. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (247):250-72.
    Leibniz's mill argument in 'Monadology' 17 is a well-known but puzzling argument against materialism about the mind. I approach the mill argument by considering other places where Leibniz gave similar arguments, using the same example of the machinery of a mill and reaching the same anti-materialist conclusion. In a 1702 letter to Bayle, Leibniz gave a mill argument that moves from his definition of perception (as the expression of a multitude by a simple) to the anti-materialist conclusion. Soon afterwards, in (...)
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  23. Stewart Duncan (2012). Debating Materialism: Cavendish, Hobbes, and More. History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (4):391-409.
    This paper discusses the materialist views of Margaret Cavendish, focusing on the relationships between her views and those of two of her contemporaries, Thomas Hobbes and Henry More. It argues for two main claims. First, Cavendish's views sit, often rather neatly, between those of Hobbes and More. She agreed with Hobbes on some issues and More on others, while carving out a distinctive alternative view. Secondly, the exchange between Hobbes, More, and Cavendish illustrates a more general puzzle about just what (...)
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  24. Steven M. Duncan, Kant's Critique of the Ontological Argument: FAIL.
    In this paper, I argue that Kant's famous critique of the Ontological Argument largely begs the question against that argument, and is no better when supplemented by the modern quantificational analysis of "exists." In particular, I argue that the claim, common to Hume and Kant, that conceptual truths can never entail substantive existential claims is false,and thus no ground for rejecting the Ontological Argument.
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  25.  19
    Zoltan Dienes & Anil K. Seth (2010). Measuring Any Conscious Content Versus Measuring the Relevant Conscious Content: Comment on Sandberg Et Al. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):1079-1080.
    Sandberg et al. show that the Perceptual Awareness Scale scale is sensitive compared to confidence ratings and wagering in detecting accurate perception. They go on to argue that the PAS scale is hence a sensitive measure of conscious perception compared to confidence ratings, a claim disputed here. The fact that some visual content is conscious does not entail that the visual content relevant to making a discrimination is conscious. For example, if one saw a square but was only aware of (...)
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  26. Stewart Duncan (2011). Hobbes, Signification, and Insignificant Names. Hobbes Studies 24 (2):158-178.
    The notion of signification is an important part of Hobbes's philosophy of language. It also has broader relevance, as Hobbes argues that key terms used by his opponents are insignificant. However Hobbes's talk about names' signification is puzzling, as he appears to have advocated conflicting views. This paper argues that Hobbes endorsed two different views of names' signification in two different contexts. When stating his theoretical views about signification, Hobbes claimed that names signify ideas. Elsewhere he talked as if words (...)
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  27. Steven M. Duncan, Descartes' Refutation of Atheism: A Defense.
    Descartes argues that, apart from the existence of a veracious God, we can have no reason to believe that we possess reliable cognitive faculties, with the result that, if atheism is true, not even our seemingly most certain beliefs can count as knowledge for us. Since the atheist denies the existence of God, he or she will be precisely in this position. I argue that Descartes' argument is sound, and that atheism is therefore self-refuting.
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  28. Elmer H. Duncan (1972). Selective Current Bibliography for Aesthetics and Related Fields. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 30 (4):577-613.
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  29. Stewart Duncan (2010). Leibniz on Hobbes's Materialism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (1):11-18.
    I consider Leibniz's thoughts about Hobbes's materialism, focusing on his less-discussed later thoughts about the topic. Leibniz understood Hobbes to have argued for his materialism from his imagistic theory of ideas. Leibniz offered several criticisms of this argument and the resulting materialism itself. Several of these criticisms occur in texts in which Leibniz was engaging with the generation of British philosophers after Hobbes. Of particular interest is Leibniz's correspondence with Damaris Masham. Leibniz may have been trying to communicate with Locke, (...)
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  30. B. M. Laing & James Seth (1923). Pragmatist and Idealist Ethics. A Reply. Philosophical Review 32 (5):526-531.
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  31. Elmer H. Duncan (1973). Selective Current Bibliography for Aesthetics and Related Fields. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 31 (4):573-590.
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  32. Stewart Duncan (2005). Hobbes's Materialism in the Early 1640s. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (3):437 – 448.
    I argue that Hobbes isn't really a materialist in the early 1640s (in, e.g., the Third Objections to Descartes's Meditations). That is, he doesn't assert that bodies are the only substances. However, he does think that bodies are the only substances we can think about using imagistic ideas.
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  33.  61
    C. Mand, L. Gillam, M. B. Delatycki & R. E. Duncan (2012). Predictive Genetic Testing in Minors for Late-Onset Conditions: A Chronological and Analytical Review of the Ethical Arguments. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (9):519-524.
    Predictive genetic testing is now routinely offered to asymptomatic adults at risk for genetic disease. However, testing of minors at risk for adult-onset conditions, where no treatment or preventive intervention exists, has evoked greater controversy and inspired a debate spanning two decades. This review aims to provide a detailed longitudinal analysis and concludes by examining the debate's current status and prospects for the future. Fifty-three relevant theoretical papers published between 1990 and December 2010 were identified, and interpretative content analysis was (...)
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  34. Stewart Duncan (2005). Knowledge of God in Leviathan. History of Philosophy Quarterly 22 (1):31-48.
    Hobbes denies in Leviathan that we have an idea of God. He does think, though, that God exists, and does not even deny that we can think about God, even though he says we have no idea of God. There is, Hobbes thinks, another cognitive mechanism by means of which we can think about God. That mechanism allows us only to think a few things about God though. This constrains what Hobbes can say about our knowledge of God, and grounds (...)
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  35. Stewart Duncan (2012). Toland, Leibniz, and Active Matter. Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 6:249-78.
    In the early years of the eighteenth century Leibniz had several interactions with John Toland. These included, from 1702 to 1704, discussions of materialism. Those discussions culminated with the consideration of Toland's 1704 Letters to Serena, where Toland argued that matter is necessarily active. In this paper I argue for two main theses about this exchange and its consequences for our wider understanding. The first is that, despite many claims that Toland was at the time of Letters to Serena a (...)
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  36.  80
    Anthony Duncan & Michel Janssen (2008). Pascual Jordan's Resolution of the Conundrum of the Wave-Particle Duality of Light. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 39 (3):634-666.
    In 1909, Einstein derived a formula for the mean square energy fluctuation in blackbody radiation. This formula is the sum of a wave term and a particle term. In a key contribution to the 1926 Dreim¨.
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  37. Stewart Duncan (2013). Materialism. In S. A. Lloyd (ed.), Bloomsbury Companion to Hobbes. Continuum
    This is a short (1,000 word) introduction to Hobbes's materialism, covering (briefly) such issues as what the relevant notion of materialism is, Hobbes's debate with Descartes, and what Hobbes's arguments for materialism were.
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  38. Andrew Seth (1881). Hegel: An Exposition and Criticism. Mind 6 (24):513-530.
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  39. Stewart Duncan (2009). Review of James R. Martel, Subverting the Leviathan. [REVIEW] Restoration, Studies in English Literary Culture, 1660-1700 33:57-9.
  40.  59
    Pierre Rainville, Rrrobert K. Hofbauer, M. Catherine Bushnell, Gary H. Duncan & Donald D. Price (2002). Hypnosis Modulates Activity in Brain Structures Involved in the Regulation of Consciousness. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 14 (6):887-901.
  41. Steven M. Duncan, The Inescapable Self.
    In this paper I discuss the existence of the substantial self and argue against those, like Hume, who deny its reality.
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  42. Steven M. Duncan, Descartes and the Crazy Argument.
    In Meditation I, Descartes dismisses the possibility that he might be insane as a ground for doubting that the senses are a source of knowledge of the external world. In this paper, I argue that Descartes was justified in so doing, and draw some general epistemological conclusions from this result.
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  43.  58
    R. Adamson, S. F., James Seth & H. Barker (1898). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 7 (25):112-127.
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  44. Steven M. Duncan, Happiness: A Preliminary Investigation.
    In this paper, I present the case for an objective, as opposed to subjective, conception of happiness along familiar, classical lines.
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  45.  23
    Anil Seth (2009). The Strength of Weak Artificial Consciousness. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 1 (1):71-82.
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  46.  36
    Anthony Duncan & Michel Janssen, On the Verge of Umdeutung in Minnesota: Van Vleck and the Correspondence Principle.
    In October 1924, The Physical Review, a relatively minor journal at the time, published a remarkable two-part paper by John H. Van Vleck, working in virtual isolation at the University of Minnesota. Van Vleck used Bohr's correspondence principle and Einstein's quantum theory of radiation to find quantum formulae for the emission, absorption, and dispersion of radiation. The paper is similar but in many ways superior to the well-known paper by Kramers and Heisenberg published the following year that is widely credited (...)
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  47. Steven M. Duncan, The Burning Bush.
    In this paper, I present some ruminations on Hume's argument from miracles and the distorted view of rationality that it reflects (along with religious skepticism generally) contrasting it with what I take to be a better account of rationality, one more sympathetic - at least less hostile - to religious claims.
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  48. Steven M. Duncan, Why There Can't Be a Self-Explanatory Series of Infinite Past Events.
    Based on a recently published essay by Jeremy Gwiazda, I argue that the possibility that the present state of the universe is the product of an actually infinite series of causally-ordered prior events is impossible in principle, and thus that a major criticism of the Secunda Via of St. Thomas is baseless after all.
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  49. Steven M. Duncan, Mind, Body, Space, and Time.
    In this essay I explore some of the basic elements of consciousness from a substance dualist point of view, incorporating some elements of Kant's Transcendental Analytic into an overall account of the constitution of consciousness.
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  50. Elmer H. Duncan (1974). American Society for Aesthetics News: Van Meter Ames: An Appreciation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 32 (4):581-582.
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