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Seth Lazar [19]Seth R. . M. Lazar [1]Seth R. M. Lazar [1]
  1. Seth Lazar (forthcoming). National Defence, Self Defence, and the Problem of Political Aggression. In Seth Lazar & Cécile Fabre (eds.), The Morality of Defensive War. Oxford University press. 10-38.
    Wars are large-scale conflicts between organized groups of belligerents, which involve suffering, devastation, and brutality unlike almost anything else in human experience. Whatever one’s other beliefs about morality, all should agree that the horrors of war are all but unconscionable, and that warfare can be justified only if we have some compel- ling account of what is worth fighting for, which can justify contributing, as individu- als and as groups, to this calamitous endeavour. Although this question should obviously be central (...)
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  2. Seth Lazar (forthcoming). Review: Cécile Fabre, Cosmopolitan War. [REVIEW] Philosophical Explorations.
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  3. Seth Lazar (forthcoming). The Principle of Distinction Between Combatants and Noncombatants in War: A Defence (MS). Oxford University Press.
    The Principle of Distinction between combatants and noncombatants in war is, if not unique, then among a vanishingly small set of moral principles on which almost everybody agrees. And yet, despite this robust historical and cross-cultural support, Distinction is fundamentally fragile. It hinders the advancement of belligerents' interests when the stakes are as high as they can possibly be. Respecting Distinction, directing force at combatants rather than noncombatants, makes military defeat more likely. In protracted asymmetric conflicts, and arduous wars of (...)
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  4. Cécile Fabre & Seth Lazar (eds.) (2014). The Morality of Defensive War. Oup Oxford.
    International law and conventional morality grant that states may stand ready to defend their borders with lethal force. But what grounds the permission to kill for the sake of political sovereignty and territorial integrity? In this book leading theorists address this vexed issue, and set the terms of future debate over national defence.
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  5. Seth Lazar (2014). Fabre , Cécile . Cosmopolitan War . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. Pp. 328. $65.00 (Cloth). Ethics 124 (2):406-412.
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  6. Seth Lazar (2013). Associative Duties and the Ethics of Killing in War. Journal of Practical Ethics 1 (1):3-48.
    this paper advances a novel account of part of what justifies killing in war, grounded in the duties we owe to our loved ones to protect them from the severe harms with which war threatens them. It discusses the foundations of associative duties, then identifies the sorts of relationships, and the specific duties that they ground, which can be relevant to the ethics of war. It explains how those associa- tive duties can justify killing in theory—in particular how they can (...)
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  7. Seth Lazar (2013). Necessity and Non-Combatant Immunity. Review of International Studies (Firstview Online) 1 (1).
    The principle of non-combatant immunity protects non-combatants against intentional attacks in war. It is the most widely endorsed and deeply held moral constraint on the conduct of war. And yet it is difficult to justify. Recent developments in just war theory have undermined the canonical argument in its favour – Michael Walzer's, in Just and Unjust Wars. Some now deny that non-combatant immunity has principled foundations, arguing instead that it is entirely explained by a different principle: that of necessity. In (...)
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  8. Seth Lazar (2012). Law of War. In Marmor Andrei (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Law. Routledge. 364.
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  9. Seth Lazar (2012). Necessity in Self-Defense and War. Philosophy and Public Affairs 40 (1):3-44.
  10. Seth Lazar (2012). Scepticism About Jus Post Bellum. In Larry May & Andrew Forcehimes (eds.), Morality, Jus Post Bellum, and International Law. Cambridge University Press.
    The burgeoning literature on jus post bellum has repeatedly reaffirmed three positions that strike me as deeply implausible: that in the aftermath of wars, compensation should be a priority; that we should likewise prioritize punishing political leaders and war criminals even in the absence of legitimate multilateral institutions; and that when states justifiably launch armed humanitarian interventions, they become responsible for reconstructing the states into which they have intervened – the so called “Pottery Barn” dictum, “You break it, you own (...)
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  11. Seth Lazar (2012). The Morality and Law of War. In Andrei Marmor (ed.), Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Law. Routledge.
    The revisionist critique of conventional just war theory has undoubtedly scored some important victories. Walzer’s elegantly unified defense of combatant legal equality and noncombatant immunity has been seriously undermined. This critical success has not, however, been matched by positive arguments, which when applied to the messy reality of war would deprive states and soldiers of the permission to fight wars that are plausibly thought to be justified. The appeal to law that is sought to resolve this objection by casting it (...)
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  12. Seth Lazar (2011). Introduction. Ethics 122 (1):8-9.
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  13. Seth Lazar (2011). War: Essays in Political Philosophy, Edited by Larry May with Emily Crookston. Mind 120 (479):895-901.
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  14. Seth Lazar (2010). A Liberal Defence of (Some) Duties to Compatriots. Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (3):246-257.
    This paper asks whether we can defend associative duties to our compatriots that are grounded solely in the relationship of liberal co-citizenship. The sort of duties that are especially salient to this relationship are duties of justice, duties to protect and improve the institutions that constitute that relationship, and a duty to favour the interests of compatriots over those of foreigners. Critics have argued that the liberal conception of citizenship is too insubstantial to sustain these duties — indeed, that it (...)
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  15. Seth Lazar (2010). The Responsibility Dilemma for Killing in War: A Review Essay. Philosophy and Public Affairs 38 (2):180-213.
  16. Cheshire Calhoun, Mark LeBar, Matthew S. Bedke, Seth Lazar, Neil Levy & Daniel M. Hausman (2009). 10. Iakovos Vasiliou, Aiming at Virtue in Plato Iakovos Vasiliou, Aiming at Virtue in Plato (Pp. 796-800). In John Hawthorne (ed.), Ethics. Wiley Periodicals, Inc..
     
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  17. Seth Lazar (2009). Debate: Do Associative Duties Really Not Matter? Journal of Political Philosophy 17 (1):90-101.
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  18. Seth Lazar (2009). Responsibility, Risk, and Killing in Self‐Defense. Ethics 119 (4):699-728.
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  19. Seth Lazar (2009). The Nature and Disvalue of Injury. Res Publica 15 (3):289-304.
    This paper explicates a conception of injury as right-violation, which allows us to distinguish between setbacks to interests that should, and should not, be the concern of theories of justice. It begins by introducing a hybrid theory of rights, grounded in (a) the mobilisation of our moral equality to (b) protect our most important interests, and shows how violations of rights are the concern of justice, while setbacks where one of the twin grounds of rights is defeated are not. It (...)
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  20. Seth R. M. Lazar (2008). Corrective Justice and the Possibility of Rectification. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (4):355 - 368.
    In this paper, I ask how – and whether – the rectification of injury at which corrective justice aims is possible, and by whom it must be performed. I split the injury up into components of harm and wrong, and consider their rectification separately. First, I show that pecuniary compensation for the harm is practically plausible, because money acts as a mediator between the damaged interest and other interests. I then argue that this is also a morally plausible approach, because (...)
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