Search results for 'Sex and law' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  28
    Stephen Law (2009). Rape is a Sex Act. Think 8 (21):69-70.
    In the preceding piece, Timothy Chambers agrees with some feminists that . Here, I briefly defend the view that, whatever else rape is, it is, indeed, a sexual (...) act. Timothy will reply in another piece. (shrink)
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  2.  17
    Stephen Law (2003). What's Wrong with Gay Sex? Think 2 (5):53.
    Mr Jarvis, a Christian, was asleep in bed, dreaming of the Last Judgement. In his dream, Jarvis found himself seated next to God in a great cloud- (...)swept hall. God had just finished handing down judgement on the drunkards, who were slowly shuffling out of the exit to the left. Angels were now ushering a group of nervous-looking men through the entrance to the right. As the men were assembled before Him, God began to speak. (shrink)
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  3. Heather M. Smith (2011). Sex Trafficking: Trends, Challenges, and the Limitations of International Law. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 12 (3):271-286.
    The passage of the UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress, and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children in 2000 marked the first global effort to address (...)
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  4.  9
    Lori Gruen & George Panichas (eds.) (1996). Sex, Morality, and the Law. Routledge.
    Sex, Morality, and the Law combines legal and philosophical arguments to focus on six controversial topics; homosexual sex, prostitution, pornography, abortion, sexual harassment, and rape. Suitable for (...)
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  5. David M. Estlund & Martha Craven Nussbaum (1997). Sex, Preference, and Family Essays on Law and Nature. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  6. Iwao Hoshii (1987). Sex in Ethics and Law. Paul Norbury Publications.
  7.  1
    Dayna Nadine Scott (2009). Gender-Benders”: Sex and Law in the Constitution of Polluted Bodies. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 17 (3):241-265.
    This paper explores how law might conceive of the injury or harm of endocrine disruption as it applies to an aboriginal community experiencing chronic chemical pollution. The (...)
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  8. Mark Strasser (2000). Sex, Law, and the Sacred Precincts of the Marital Bedroom: On State and Federal Right to Privacy Jurisprudence. Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy 14 (2):753-790.
     
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  9.  35
    Robert E. Rodes (1983). Sex, Law, and Liberation. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 58 (1):43-60.
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  10.  13
    Adam Hosein (2015). Freedom, Sex Roles, and Anti-Discrimination Law. Law and Philosophy 34 (5):485-517.
    In this paper I consider the role of freedom in the justification of prohibitions on discrimination. As a case study, I focus mainly on U.S. constitutional (...)and employment law and, in particular, restrictions on sex-stereotyping. I present a new argument that freedom can play at least some important role in justifying these restrictions. Not just any freedom, I claim: the Millian freedom to challenge existing stereotypes and contribute to social change. Thissocial change account’, I argue, can be a useful supplement to the existing theories where their explanations run out. It also draws support from familiar liberal justifications for speech and other liberties, and provides an attractive role for the courts. (shrink)
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  11.  1
    K. Ali (2011). Off the Straight Path: Illicit Sex, Law, and Community in Ottoman Aleppo * by Elyse Semerdjian. Journal of Islamic Studies 22 (1):84-87.
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  12.  1
    Bridie Andrews (2003). Matthew H. Sommer.Sex, Law, and Society in Late Imperial China. Xx + 413 Pp., Illus., Apps., Bibl., Index. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2000. $55. [REVIEW] Isis 94 (2):357-358.
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  13.  5
    Sarah Pinto (2012). The Limits of Diagnosis: Sex, Law, and Psychiatry in a Case of Contested Marriage. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 40 (2):119-141.
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  14. Sarah Pinto (2012). The Limits of Diagnosis: Sex, Law, and Psychiatry in a Case of Contested Marriage. Ethos 40 (2):119-141.
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  15. Bradly W. Reed & Matthew H. Sommer (2002). Sex, Law, and Society in Late Imperial China. Journal of the American Oriental Society 122 (3):626.
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  16.  92
    G. Loughlin (2003). Sex After Natural Law. Studies in Christian Ethics 16 (1):14-28.
    The Church is a sexed body, in both carnal and symbolic terms. The Church has sex, but being the Church it does so in a radically creative (...)
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  17.  6
    Kate Greasley (2016). Is Sex-Selective Abortion Against the Law? Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 36 (3):535-564.
    The article addresses the legal status ofsex-selectiveabortion in British law. It argues, firstly, that abortions for which knowledge of fetal sex is abut-for (...)cause can be lawful under the terms of the Abortion Act 1967, so long as one of the physical or mental health grounds in section 1 of the Act is attested to in good faith by two medical professionals. The failure of governmental and health bodies to correctly state the law pertaining to sex-selective abortion in recent years owes in part to the failure to distinguish the legal grounds for abortion from the factual explanations for abortion, a distinction which, I argue, is essential for understanding the structure of Britains abortion law. The article also considers the claim that abortions carried out partly for reasons of fetal sex are unlawful, or, if not, ought to be legally prohibited, because of reasonable doubts about patient consent. It points out some key ways in which this consent-based objection is difficult to square with our general abortion permissions. (shrink)
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  18.  17
    Paul Johnson, Ordinary Folk and Cottaging: Law, Morality, and Public Sex.
    The Sexual Offences Act 2003 introduced a new statutory offence of "sexual activity in a public lavatory" into English law. Although written as a gender-neutral offence, (...)the statute was formulated and enacted on the basis of concerns about male homosexual sexual activity in public lavatories ("cottaging"). This paper examines the justifications for, and implications of, the legislation. It considers the main arguments made in support of the offence and situates these within established moral, legal, and social debates about homosexuality. The paper considers the relationship between conceptions of public and private morality in relation to the legal regulation of homosexual sex. It goes on to explore the complex nature of regulating public sex in relation to sexual practices which often maintain high degrees of privacy. The final part of the paper argues that the legislation is largely in contradiction with the realities of police work and contemporary law enforcement. (shrink)
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  19. Lori Gruen (ed.) (2013). Sex, Morality, and the Law. Routledge.
    ____Sex, Morality, and the Law__ combines legal and philosophical arguments to focus on six controversial topics; homosexual sex, prostitution, pornography, abortion, sexual harassment, and rape. Suitable for (...)
     
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  20. Prabha Kotiswaran (2011). Dangerous Sex, Invisible Labor: Sex Work and the Law in India. Princeton University Press.
    Popular representations of third-world sex workers as sex slaves and vectors of HIV have spawned abolitionist legal reforms that are harmful and ineffective, and public health (...)initiatives that provide only marginal protection of sex workers' rights. In this book, Prabha Kotiswaran asks how we might understand sex workers' demands that they be treated as workers. She contemplates questions of redistribution through law within the sex industry by examining the political economies and legal ethnographies of two archetypical urban sex markets in India.Kotiswaran conducted in-depth fieldwork among sex workers in Sonagachi, Kolkata's largest red-light area, and Tirupati, a temple town in southern India. Providing new insights into the lives of these women--many of whom are demanding the respect and legal protection that other workers get--Kotiswaran builds a persuasive theoretical case for recognizing these women's sexual labor. Moving beyond standard feminist discourse on prostitution, she draws on a critical genealogy of materialist feminism for its sophisticated vocabulary of female reproductive and sexual labor, and uses a legal realist approach to show why criminalization cannot succeed amid the informal social networks and economic structures of sex markets. Based on this, Kotiswaran assesses the law's redistributive potential by analyzing the possible economic consequences of partial decriminalization, complete decriminalization, and legalization. She concludes with a theory of sex work from a postcolonial materialist feminist perspective. (shrink)
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  21. Charles Patrick Ewing (2011). Justice Perverted: Sex Offense Law, Psychology, and Public Policy. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Over the past quarter century Congress, state legislatures and the courts have radically reshaped America's laws dealing with sex offenders in an effort to reduce the (...)prevalence of sex offenses. Most convicted sex offenders must now register with the authorities, who then make information about them available to the public. Possession of child pornography has been made an extremely serious crime often punishable by prison sentences that dwarf those meted out to child molesters, rapists, robbers, and even killers. Federal law now imposes a minimum sentence of ten years in prison for those convicted of using the internet to attempt to lure minors for sex. And the federal government and 20 states have "sexually violent predator" laws that allow the indefinite civil commitment of convicted sex offenders to secure institutions for treatment after they have served their full criminal sentences. All of these changes in sex offender law, as well as numerous others, have been based at least in part on input from psychology, psychiatry and the social sciences. Moreover, enforcement and administration of many of these laws relies to a large extent on the efforts of mental health professionals. However, many questions about this involvement remain largely unanswered. Are these laws supported by empirical evidence, or even by well-reasoned psychological theories? Do these laws actually work? Are mental health professionals capable of reliably determining an offender's future behavior, and how best to manage it? Finally, are experts capable of providing effective treatment for sex offenders -- i.e., treatment that actually reduces the likelihood that an identified sex offender will re-offend?In Justice Perverted, Charles Patrick Ewing poses these difficult questions and others that few in either law or psychology have asked, much less tried to answer. Drawing on research from across the social and behavioral sciences, he weighs the evidence for the spectrum of sex offense laws, to occasionally surprising results. A rational look at an intensely emotional subject, Justice Perverted is an essential book for anyone interested in the science behind public practice. (shrink)
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  22.  34
    Vanessa E. Munro & Jane Scoular (2012). Abusing Vulnerability? Contemporary Law and Policy Responses to Sex Work in the UK. Feminist Legal Studies 20 (3):189-206.
    There has been an exponential rise in use of the term vulnerability across a number of political and policy arenas, including child protection, sexual offences, poverty, development, (...)
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  23.  16
    Timothy Hsiao (2016). Consenting Adults, Sex, and Natural Law Theory. Philosophia 43:1-21.
    This paper argues for the superiority of natural law theory over consent -based approaches to sexual morality. I begin by criticizing theconsenting adultssexual ethic that (...)
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  24.  15
    Richard Collier (1999). Law, Sex Difference and the Body. Res Publica 5 (2):217-225.
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  25.  15
    Kim M. Blankenship & Stephen Koester (2002). Criminal Law, Policing Policy, and HIV Risk in Female Street Sex Workers and Injection Drug Users. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 30 (4):548-559.
  26.  29
    Joan McGregor (1996). Why When She Says No She Doesn'T Mean Maybe and Doesn'T Mean Yes: A Critical Reconstruction of Consent, Sex, and The Law. Legal Theory 2 (3):175-208.
    A little more than two years ago, a Texas woman, faced with a knife-wielding intruder demanding sex from her, tried to talk her attacker into wearing (...)a condom to protect herself against the possibility of contracting AIDS. A grand jury refused to indict the man because jurors believed that the woman's act of self-protection implied that she had consented to sex. (shrink)
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  27. Kim M. Blankenship & Stephen Koester (2002). Criminal Law, Policing Policy, and HIV Risk in Female Street Sex Workers and Injection Drug Users. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):548-559.
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  28. David M. Estlund & Martha C. Nussbaum (eds.) (1998). Sex, Preference, and Family: Essays on Law and Nature. Oxford University Press Usa.
    In this timely, provocative volume, essayists including Susan Moller Okin, Catherine A. MacKinnon, Cass Sunstein, Martha Minow, William Galston, and Sara McLanahan argue positions on sexuality, on (...)
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  29. Vicki Schultz (1992). ""Women" Before" the Law: Judicial Stories About Women, Work, and Sex Segregation on the Job. In Judith Butler & Joan Wallach Scott (eds.), Feminists Theorize the Political. Routledge 297--338.
     
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  30.  7
    Stephen J. Schulhofer (2001). [Book Review] Unwanted Sex, the Culture of Intimidation and the Failure of Law. [REVIEW] Criminal Justice Ethics 20 (1):45-52.
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  31.  30
    Anne M. Edwards (1998). Sex, Morality, and the Law. Teaching Philosophy 21 (1):82-84.
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  32.  33
    T. Chappell (1997). Sex Selection for Non-Medical Reasons: Advisory Report of the Standing Committee on Medical Ethics and Health Law of the Health Council of the Netherlands. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (2):120-121.
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  33.  24
    Carole Pateman (1990). Sex and Power:Feminism Unmodified: Discourses on Life and Law. Catherine A. MacKinnon. Ethics 100 (2):398-.
  34.  2
    Deborah L. Rhode (1991). [Book Review] Justice and Gender, Sex Discrimination and the Law. [REVIEW] Feminist Studies 17:493-507.
  35.  19
    Frederick A. Elliston (1987). Sex, Ethics and the Practice of Law. Journal of Business Ethics 6 (5):355-360.
    A woman walks into a room and sits down beside a man. They talk and as they talk he puts his arm around her. After a few (...)
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  36.  15
    Patricia Smith (2004). Book Review: Rape and Equal Protection: A Review of Stephen J. Schulhofer's Unwanted Sex: The Culture of Intimidation and the Failure of Law (Harvard University Press, 1998) and Andrew E. Taslitz's Rape and the Culture of the Courtroom. [REVIEW] Hypatia 19 (2):152-157.
  37.  11
    Benjamin Baez (2001). Sex Harassment in Schools: The Politics of Law, Power, Sexuality, and Speech. Educational Theory 51 (1):45-62.
  38.  9
    David M. Adams (2002). Book Review: Janet L. Dolgin. Families: Law, Gender and Difference and Defining the Family: Law, Technology, and Reproduction in an Uneasy Age. By New York: New York University Press, 1997. And David M. Estlund and Martha C. Nussbaum. Sex, Preference, and Family: Essays in Law and Nature. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (3):254-256.
  39.  8
    Cass R. Sunstein (1994). Same-Sex Relations and the Law. Metaphilosophy 25 (4):262-284.
  40.  3
    Barry Fitzpatrick (1989). The Significance of EEC Directives in UK Sex Discrimination Law. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 9 (3):336-355.
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  41.  6
    Susan Dwyer (1998). David M. Estlund and Martha C. Nussbaum, Eds., Sex, Preference, and Family: Essays on Law and Nature:Sex, Preference, and Family: Essays on Law and Nature. [REVIEW] Ethics 109 (1):184-187.
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  42.  5
    Gary T. Marx (1992). UndertheCovers Undercover Investigations: Some Reflections on the State's Use of Sex and Deception in Law Enforcement. Criminal Justice Ethics 11 (1):13-24.
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  43. Robert C. Figueira (1989). James A. Brundage, Law, Sex, and Christian Society in Medieval Europe. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1988. Pp. Xxiv, 674; 20 Black-and-White Facsimile Plates. $45. [REVIEW] Speculum 64 (3):674-678.
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  44.  2
    R. G. Frey (1983). Sex, Drugs, Death, and the Law. Philosophical Books 24 (4):234-236.
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  45.  3
    Gerald Dworkin (1983). Book Review:Sex, Drugs, Death and the Law. David A. J. Richards. [REVIEW] Ethics 94 (1):155-.
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  46.  1
    Alex Sharpe (2013). Julie A. Greenberg: Intersexuality and the Law: Why Sex Matters. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 21 (3):327-330.
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  47.  1
    Paul Fouracre (1989). Law, Sex and Christian Society in Medieval Europe. History of European Ideas 10 (4):495-496.
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  48. David M. Adams (2002). Book Review: Janet L. Dolgin. Families: Law, Gender and Difference and Defining the Family: Law, Technology, and Reproduction in an Uneasy Age. By New York: New York University Press, 1997. And David M. Estlund and Martha C. Nussbaum. Sex, Preference, and Family: Essays in Law and Nature. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997. [REVIEW] Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 17 (3):254-256.
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  49. Fitzpatrick Barry (1989). The Significance of Eec Directives in Uk Sex Discrimination Law. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 9 (3).
     
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  50. Robert C. Figueira (1989). Law, Sex, and Christian Society in Medieval EuropeJames A. Brundage. Speculum 64 (3):674-678.
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