Search results for 'Shalom Lappin with S. Shieber' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Shalom Lappin with S. Shieber, Machine Learning Theory and Practice as a Source of Insight Into Universal Grammar.score: 3870.0
  2. Stuart M. Shieber (ed.) (2004). The Turing Test: Verbal Behavior As the Hallmark of Intelligence. MIT Press.score: 900.0
    Stuart M. Shieber’s name is well known to computational linguists for his research and to computer scientists more generally for his debate on the Loebner Turing Test competition, which appeared a decade earlier in Communications of the ACM (Shieber 1994a, 1994b; Loebner 1994).1 With this collection, I expect it to become equally well known to philosophers.
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  3. Joseph Shieber (2012). Against Credibility. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (1):1 - 18.score: 450.0
    How does the monitoring of a testifier's credibility by recipients of testimony bear upon the epistemic licence accruing to a recipient's belief in the testifier's communications? According to an intuitive and philosophically influential conception, licensed acceptance of testimony requires that recipients of testimony monitor testifiers with respect to their credibility. I argue that this conception, however, proves to be untenable when confronted with the wealth of empirical evidence bearing on the ways in which testifiers and their interlocutors actually (...)
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  4. Joseph Shieber (2013). Toward a Truly Social Epistemology: Babbage, the Division of Mental Labor, and the Possibility of Socially Distributed Warrant. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (2):266-294.score: 450.0
    In what follows, I appeal to Charles Babbage’s discussion of the division of mental labor to provide evidence that—at least with respect to the social acquisition, storage, retrieval, and transmission of knowledge—epistemologists have, for a broad range of phenomena of crucial importance to actual knowers in their epistemic practices in everyday life, failed adequately to appreciate the significance of socially distributed cognition. If the discussion here is successful, I will have demonstrated that a particular presumption widely held within the (...)
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  5. Joseph Shieber (2009). Epistemological Contextualism and the Knowledge Account of Assertion. Philosophia 37 (1):169-181.score: 450.0
    In this paper, I take up an argument advanced by Keith DeRose (Philosophical Review, 111:167–203, 2002) that suggests that the knowledge account of assertion provides the basis of an argument in favor of contextualism. I discuss the knowledge account as the conjunction of two theses—a thesis claiming that knowledge is sufficient to license assertion KA and one claiming that knowledge is necessary to license assertion AK. Adducing evidence from Stalnaker’s account of assertion, from conversational practice, and from arguments often raised (...)
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  6. Joseph Shieber (2009). Locke on Testimony: A Reexamination. History of Philosophy Quarterly 26 (1):21 - 41.score: 450.0
    In this paper I focus on John Locke as a representative figure of English Enlightenment theorizing about the legitimacy of cognitive authority and examine the way in which a greater attention to the cultural milieu in which Locke worked can lead to a profound reexamination of his writings on cognitive authority. In particular, I suggest that an inattention to the rise of a culture of reading and the growing availability of books in Early Modern England has led historians of philosophy (...)
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  7. Joseph Shieber (1999). On the Tenability of Non-Factualism with Regard to the a Priori. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 80 (4):379–390.score: 240.0
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  8. M. H. A. Newman, Alan M. Turing, Geoffrey Jefferson, R. B. Braithwaite & S. Shieber (2004). Can Automatic Calculating Machines Be Said to Think? In Stuart M. Shieber (ed.), The Turing Test: Verbal Behavior as the Hallmark of Intelligence. Mit Press.score: 240.0
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  9. Joseph H. Shieber (1998). John W. Burbidge, Real Process: How Logic and Chemistry Combine in Hegel's Philosophy of Nature Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 18 (1):12-14.score: 240.0
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  10. Joseph Shieber (1999). Reid on Cartesianism With Regard to Testimony: A Non-Reductivist Reappraisal. Reid Studies 2 (2):59-69.score: 240.0
  11. Joseph Shieber (2009). Personal Responsibility and Middle Knowledge: A Challenge for the Molinist. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 66 (2):61 - 70.score: 120.0
    In this paper, I develop and discuss an argument intended to demonstrate that the Molinist notion of middle knowledge, and in particular the concept of counterfactuals of freedom, is incompatible with the notion of personal responsibility (for created creatures). In Sect. 1, I discuss the Molinist concepts of middle knowledge and counterfactuals of freedom. In Sect. 2, I develop an argument (henceforth, the Transfer of Negative Responsibility Argument, or TNRA) to the effect that, due to their construal of the (...)
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  12. Joseph Shieber (2010). On the Possibility of Conceptually Structured Experience: Demonstrative Concepts and Fineness of Grain. Inquiry 53 (4):383-397.score: 120.0
    In this paper I consider one of the influential challenges to the notion that perceptual experience might be completely conceptually structured, a challenge that rests on the idea that conceptual structure cannot do justice to the fineness of grain of perceptual experience. In so doing, I canvass John McDowell's attempt to meet this challenge by appeal to the notion of demonstrative concepts and review some criticisms recently leveled at McDowell's deployment of demonstrative concepts for this purpose by Sean D. Kelly. (...)
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  13. Stuart M. Shieber, Fernando C. N. Pereira & Mary Dalrymple (1996). Interactions of Scope and Ellipsis. Linguistics and Philosophy 19 (5):527 - 552.score: 120.0
    Systematic semantic ambiguities result from the interaction of the two operations that are involved in resolving ellipsis in the presence of scoping elements such as quantifiers and intensional operators: scope determination for the scoping elements and resolution of the elided relation. A variety of problematic examples previously noted - by Sag, Hirschbüihler, Gawron and Peters, Harper, and others - all have to do with such interactions. In previous work, we showed how ellipsis resolution can be stated and solved in (...)
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  14. Stuart M. Shieber (2007). The Turing Test as Interactive Proof. Noûs 41 (4):686–713.score: 120.0
    In 1950, Alan Turing proposed his eponymous test based on indistinguishability of verbal behavior as a replacement for the question "Can machines think?" Since then, two mutually contradictory but well-founded attitudes towards the Turing Test have arisen in the philosophical literature. On the one hand is the attitude that has become philosophical conventional wisdom, viz., that the Turing Test is hopelessly flawed as a sufficient condition for intelligence, while on the other hand is the overwhelming sense that were a machine (...)
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  15. Joseph Shieber (2012). A Partial Defense of Intuition on Naturalist Grounds. Synthese 187 (2):321-341.score: 120.0
    The debate concerning the role of intuitions in philosophy has been characterized by a fundamental disagreement between two main camps. The first, the autonomists, hold that, due to the use in philosophical investigation of appeals to intuition, most of the central questions of philosophy can in principle be answered by philosophical investigation and argument without relying on the sciences. The second, the naturalists, deny the possibility of a priori knowledge and are skeptical of the role of intuition in providing evidence (...)
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  16. Stuart M. Shieber (2014). There Can Be No Turing-Test-Passing Memorizing Machines. Philosophers' Imprint 14 (16).score: 120.0
    Anti-behaviorist arguments against the validity of the Turing Test as a sufficient condition for attributing intelligence are based on a memorizing machine, which has recorded within it responses to every possible Turing Test interaction of up to a fixed length. The mere possibility of such a machine is claimed to be enough to invalidate the Turing Test. I consider the nomological possibility of memorizing machines, and how long a Turing Test they can pass. I replicate my previous analysis of this (...)
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  17. William J. Rapaport, Review of The Turing Test: Verbal Behavior As the Hallmark of Intelligence. [REVIEW]score: 81.0
    Stuart M. Shieber’s name is well known to computational linguists for his research and to computer scientists more generally for his debate on the Loebner Turing Test competition, which appeared a decade earlier in Communications of the ACM (Shieber 1994a, 1994b; Loebner 1994).1 With this collection, I expect it to become equally well known to philosophers.
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  18. Matthew Stone, A Handbook for Language Engineers.score: 24.0
    cal practice: the enterprise of specifying information about the world for use in computer systems. Knowledge representation as a field also encompasses conceptual results that call practitioners’ attention to important truths about the world, mathematical results that allow practitioners to make these truths precise, and computational results that put these truths to work. This chapter surveys this practice and its results, as it applies to the interpretation of natural language utterances in implemented natural language processing systems. For a broader perspective (...)
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