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Profile: Shamik Dasgupta (Princeton University)
  1. Shamik Dasgupta (2014). The Possibility of Physicalism. Journal of Philosophy 111 (9/10):557-592.
    It has been suggested that many philosophical theses—physicalism, normative naturalism, phenomenalism, and so on—should be understood in terms of ground. Against this, Ted Sider (2011) has argued that ground is ill-suited for this purpose. Here I develop Sider’s objection and offer a response. In doing so I develop a view about the role of ground in philosophy, and about the content of these distinctively philosophical theses.
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    Shamik Dasgupta (2014). On the Plurality of Grounds. Philosophers' Imprint 14 (20).
    This paper argues that ground is irreducibly plural: a group of facts can be grounded together, as a collective, even though no member of the group has a ground on its own. This kind of plural grounding is applied to the metaphysics of individuals and quantities, yielding a “structuralist” view in each case. Some more general implications of plural grounding are also discussed.
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  3. Shamik Dasgupta (2009). Individuals: An Essay in Revisionary Metaphysics. Philosophical Studies 145 (1):35 - 67.
    We naturally think of the material world as being populated by a large number of individuals . These are things, such as my laptop and the particles that compose it, that we describe as being propertied and related in various ways when we describe the material world around us. In this paper I argue that, fundamentally speaking at least, there are no such things as material individuals. I then propose and defend an individual-less view of the material world I call (...)
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    Shamik Dasgupta (2016). Metaphysical Rationalism. Noûs 50 (2):379-418.
    The Principle of Sufficient Reason states that everything has an explanation. But different notions of explanation yield different versions of this principle. Here a version is formulated in terms of the notion of a “grounding” explanation. Its consequences are then explored, with particular emphasis on the fact that it implies necessitarianism, the view that every truth is necessarily true. Finally, the principle is defended from a number of objections, including objections to necessitarianism. The result is a defense of a “rationalist” (...)
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  5. Shamik Dasgupta (2014). Metaphysical Rationalism. Noûs 50 (1).
    The Principle of Sufficient Reason states that everything has an explanation. But different notions of explanation yield different versions of this principle. Here a version is formulated in terms of the notion of a “grounding” explanation. Its consequences are then explored, with particular emphasis on the fact that it implies necessitarianism, the view that every truth is necessarily true. Finally, the principle is defended from a number of objections, including objections to necessitarianism. The result is a defense of a “rationalist” (...)
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  6.  53
    Shamik Dasgupta (2013). Absolutism Vs Comparativism About Quantity. Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 8.
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    Shamik Dasgupta (2015). Inexpressible Ignorance. Philosophical Review 124 (4):441-480.
    Sometimes, ignorance is inexpressible. Lewis recognized this when he argued, in “Ramseyan Humility,” that we cannot know which property occupies which causal role. This peculiar state of ignorance arises in a number of other domains too, including ignorance about our position in space and the identities of individuals. In these cases, one does not know something, and yet one cannot give voice to one's ignorance in a certain way. But what does the ignorance in these cases consist in? This essay (...)
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    Shamik Dasgupta (2011). The Bare Necessities. Philosophical Perspectives 25 (1):115-160.
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    Shamik Dasgupta (2015). Substantivalism Vs Relationalism About Space in Classical Physics. Philosophy Compass 10 (9):601-624.
    Substantivalism is the view that space exists in addition to any material bodies situated within it. Relationalism is the opposing view that there is no such thing as space; there are just material bodies, spatially related to one another. This paper assesses this issue in the context of classical physics. It starts by describing the bucket argument for substantivalism. It then turns to anti-substantivalist arguments, including Leibniz's classic arguments and their contemporary reincarnation under the guise of ‘symmetry’. It argues that (...)
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    Shamik Dasgupta (2015). Teaching and Learning Guide For: Substantivalism Vs Relationalism About Space in Classical Physics. Philosophy Compass 10 (10):736-737.
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    Shamik Dasgupta (2009). Individuals: An Essay in Revisionary Metaphysics. Philosophical Studies 145 (1):35-67.
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  12. Shamik Dasgupta & Brad Weslake (eds.) (2016). Current Controversies in Philosophy of Science. Routledge.
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