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Profile: Shane Mackinlay (Catholic Theological College, University of Divinity, Melbourne)
  1. Shane Mackinlay (2010). Interpreting Excess: Jean-Luc Marion, Saturated Phenomena, and Hermeneutics. Fordham University Press.
    Introduction -- Marion's claims -- The hermeneutic structure of phenomenality -- The theory of saturated phenomena -- Events -- Dazzling idols and paintings -- Flesh as absolute -- The face as irregardable icon -- Revelation : the phenomenon of God's appearing -- Conclusion: Revising the phenomenology of givenness.
     
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    Shane Mackinlay (forthcoming). Hermeneutic Perspectives on Ontology, After Metaphysics has Been Overcome: From Levinas to Merleau-Ponty. Sophia:1-10.
    One of the ways in which Heidegger characterised his philosophical project was as ‘overcoming metaphysics.’ This was a way of expressing the task of destruction—or, in Derrida’s version, deconstruction—of the tradition of western philosophy. One of the consequences of Heidegger’s critique of traditional western metaphysics is that, in the decades since, there has been a reluctance to engage in anything that might be called ‘metaphysics’. This is somewhat ironic, given that one of the branches of metaphysics is ontology, and that (...)
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    Shane Mackinlay (2010). Heidegger's Temple: How Truth Happens When Nothing is Portrayed. Sophia 49 (4):499-507.
    In his essay The Origin of the Work of Art, Martin Heidegger discusses three examples of artworks: a painting by Van Gogh of peasant shoes, a poem about a Roman fountain, and a Greek temple. The new entry on Heidegger’s aesthetics in the Stanford Encylopedia of Philosophy, written by Iain Thomson, focuses on this essay, and Van Gogh’s painting in particular. It argues that Heidegger uses Van Gogh’s painting to set art, as the happening of truth, in relation to ‘nothing’, (...)
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    Shane Mackinlay (2004). Eyes Wide Shut: A Response to Jean‐Luc Marion's Account of the Journey to Emmaus. Modern Theology 20 (3):447-456.
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    Shane Mackinlay (2012). A Genealogy of Marion's Philosophy of Religion. Review of Metaphysics 65 (3):656-658.
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    Shane Mackinlay (2013). Thinking Things Through: Essays in Philosophy and Christian Faith [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 90 (4):500.
    Mackinlay, Shane Review(s) of: Thinking things through: Essays in philosophy and Christian faith, by Andrew Murray SM, (Adelaide: ATF Theology, 2012), pp. 228 + xvi, $34.95 (Electronic: $15.95).
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