Search results for 'Shari Tresky' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ron Amundson & Shari Tresky (2008). Bioethics and Disability Rights: Conflicting Values and Perspectives. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2/3):111-123.score: 240.0
    Continuing tensions exist between mainstream bioethics and advocates of the disability rights movement. This paper explores some of the grounds for those tensions as exemplified in From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice by Allen Buchanan and coauthors, a book by four prominent bioethicists that is critical of the disability rights movement. One set of factors involves the nature of disability and impairment. A second set involves presumptions regarding social values, including the importance of intelligence in relation to other human (...)
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  2. Ron Amundson & Shari Tresky (2007). On a Bioethical Challenge to Disability Rights. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (6):541 – 561.score: 240.0
    Tensions exist between the disability rights movement and the work of many bioethicists. These reveal themselves in a major recent book on bioethics and genetics, From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice. This book defends certain genetic policies against criticisms from disability rights advocates, in part by arguing that it is possible to accept both the genetic policies and the rights of people with impairments. However, a close reading of the book reveals a series of direct moral criticisms of the (...)
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  3. D. Christopher Ralston & Justin Ho (2007). Disability, Humanity, and Personhood: A Survey of Moral Concepts. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (6):619 – 633.score: 30.0
    Three of the articles included in this issue of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy - Ron Amundson and Shari Tresky's "On a Bioethical Challenge to Disability Rights"; Rachel Cooper's "Can It Be a Good Thing to Be Deaf?"; and Mark T. Brown's "The Potential of the Human Embryo" - interact (in various ways) with the concepts of disability, humanity, and personhood and their normative dimensions. As one peruses these articles, it becomes apparent that terms like "disability," "human (...)
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  4. Waxman Shari (2003). She Was a Teenage Martyr. Free Inquiry 23 (2):38.score: 30.0
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  5. Edward Omar Moad (2007). A Path to the Oasis: Sharī'ah and Reason in Islamic Moral Epistemology. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (3):135 - 148.score: 18.0
    I propose a framework for comparative Islamic—Western ethics in which the Islamic categories "Islam, Iman," and "Ihsan" are juxtaposed with the concepts of obligation, value, and virtue, respectively. I argue that "shari'a" refers to both the obligation component and the entire structure of the Islamic ethic; suggesting a suspension of the understanding of "shari'a" as simply Islamic "law," and an alternative understanding of "usul al-fiqh" as a moral epistemology of obligation. I will test this approach by addressing the (...)
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  6. Houssem Eddine Bedoui & Walid Mansour (forthcoming). Performance and Maqasid Al-Shari'Ah's Pentagon-Shaped Ethical Measurement. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-22.score: 18.0
    Business performance is traditionally viewed from the one-dimensional financial angle. This paper develops a new approach that links performance to the ethical vision of Islam based on maqasid al-shari’ah (i.e., the objectives of Islamic law). The approach involves a Pentagon-shaped performance scheme structure via five pillars, namely wealth, posterity, intellect, faith, and human self. Such a scheme ensures that any firm or organization can ethically contribute to the promotion of human welfare, prevent corruption, and enhance social and economic stability (...)
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  7. Kamal Halili Hassan & Mostafa Seraji (2013). Addressing Workers' Freedom of Association and its Dispute Resolution in the Context of the Shari'Ah. Human Rights Review 14 (2):89-105.score: 18.0
    Freedom of association for trade union has been generally accepted as part of basic human rights in Islam. Freedom of association, which include the right to join and participate in trade union activities, can be susceptible to disputes between employers and employees as well as trade unions. Islam provides freedom of association in labour relations and also mechanisms to settle disputes pertaining to such freedom. Conciliation (sulh) and arbitration (tahkim) are both used methods in the inception of Islam, which have (...)
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  8. Shakir Ullah, Dima Jamali & Ian A. Harwood (2014). Socially Responsible Investment: Insights From Shari'a Departments in Islamic Financial Institutions. Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (2):218-233.score: 12.0
    Islamic financial institutions (IFIs) are emerging as prominent players in the financial world and are increasingly known for their conservative socially responsible investment (SRI). Being the Shari'a regulators and monitors of IFIs, the Shari'a departments are expected to implement the Islamic perspective of SRI – drawn from Shari'a principles – in their respective institutions. The purpose of this paper is to develop an SRI framework applicable to IFIs and other Shari'a compliant entities and assess its applicability (...)
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  9. Daniel Ungureanu (2008). De paidéuma à la shari`a. Cultura 5 (1):107-119.score: 12.0
    “From Paideuma to Shari’a”. Paideuma, concept developed by Leo Frobenius at the beginning of the XXth century, seems to regain its proper actuality when we try to understand the Islamic civilization. Among the roots which define a paideuma, in the particular case of Islam we identified the shari’a as being the most significant one. Shari`a also brings with it a new dimension: the continuous extension of the paideuma, which overpasses frontiers and national identities. The famous sartrian expression (...)
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  10. Abdul Kabir Hussain Solihu & Abdul Rauf Ambali (2011). Dissolving the Engineering Moral Dilemmas Within the Islamic Ethico-Legal Praxes. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (1):133-147.score: 9.0
    The goal of responsible engineers is the creation of useful and safe technological products and commitment to public health, while respecting the autonomy of the clients and the public. Because engineers often face moral dilemma to resolve such issues, different engineers have chosen different course of actions depending on their respective moral value orientations. Islam provides a value-based mechanism rooted in the Maqasid al-Shari‘ah (the objectives of Islamic law). This mechanism prioritizes some values over others and could help resolve (...)
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  11. Andrew F. March, Islamic Legal Theory, Secularism and Religious Pluralism: Is Modern Religious Freedom Sufficient for the Shari'a 'Purpose [Maqsid]' of 'Preserving Religion [Hifz Al-Din]?'.score: 9.0
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  12. Bassam Tibi (2008). The Return of the Sacred to Politics as a Constitutional Law
    The Case of the Shari'Atization of Politics in Islamic Civilization.
    Theoria 55 (115):91-119.
    score: 9.0
  13. Christopher J. Eberle (2012). Shari'a Reasoning and the Justice of Religious War. Philosophia 40 (2):195-211.score: 9.0
    Most contemporary advocates of the Just War Tradition (JWT) condemn religious war. If they are correct, waging war should be a secular affair, fully justifiable on non-religious grounds. This secularized understanding of the JWT draws on normative commitments that lead many political theorists to advocate in favor of a secularized politics in western liberal polities. As a matter of historical fact and contemporary commitment, many Muslims have rejected the secularized conception of the morality of war found in contemporary conceptions of (...)
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  14. Susan Babbitt (2006). Book Review: Shari Stone-Mediatore. Reading Across Borders: Storytelling and Knowledges of Resistance. Newyork: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. [REVIEW] Hypatia 21 (3):203-206.score: 9.0
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  15. Katy Gray Brown (2003). Book Review: Shari M. Huhndorf. Going Native: Indians in the American Cultural Imagination. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2001. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (3):218-221.score: 9.0
  16. Noor Munirah Isa & Saadan Man (forthcoming). “First Things First”: Application of Islamic Principles of Priority in the Ethical Assessment of Genetically Modified Foods. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics:1-14.score: 9.0
    Advancement of modern agricultural biotechnology has brought various potential benefits to humankind, but at the same time ethical concerns regarding some applications such as genetically modified foods (GMF) have been raised among the public. Several questions are being posed; should they utilize such applications to improve quality of their life, or should they refrain in order to save themselves from any associated risk? What are the ethical principles that can be applied to assess these applications? By using GMF as a (...)
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  17. Youssef Cherem (2011). As ambiguidades do direito islâmico em contextos contemporâneos (The ambiguities of Islamic law in contemporary contexts) - DOI: 10.5752/ P.2175-5841.2011v9n20p153. [REVIEW] Horizonte 9 (20):153-170.score: 9.0
    Resumo Uma das reivindicações centrais dos movimentos políticos islâmicos é cumprir ou impor a sharī'a . Mas a visão que esses movimentos têm destoa da maneira como os sistemas jurídicos muçulmanos funcionaram historicamente. A própria definição de sharī'a , sua relação com o poder político, e sua aplicação num processo que leva a uma decisão jurídica, foram simplificados durante o processo de codificação dos séculos XIX e XX, e os movimentos islamistas são herdeiros dessa concepção "ocidentalizada" de sharī'a. Frequentemente traduzido (...)
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  18. Don Conway-Long (2012). Islam and the Secular State: Negotiating the Future of Shari'a by Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 13 (2):251-253.score: 9.0
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  19. Ahmad Dallal (1995). An Islamic Response to Greek Astronomy: Kitāb Ta'dīl Hay'at Al-Aflāk of Sadr Al-Sharī'a. Edited with Translation and Commentary. Brill.score: 9.0
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  20. Asghar Ali Engineer (2004). Islam, Women and Gender Justice (Shari'Ah Law). Journal of Dharma 29 (2):183-200.score: 9.0
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  21. Mohd Salim Mohamed & Siti Nurani Mohd Noor (forthcoming). Islamic Bioethical Deliberation on the Issue of Newborns with Disorders of Sex Development. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-12.score: 9.0
    This article presents the Islamic bioethical deliberation on the issue of sex assignment surgery (SAS) for infants with disorders of sex development (DSD) or intersexed as a case study. The main objective of this study is to present a different approach in assessing a biomedical issue within the medium of the Maqasid al-Shari’ah. Within the framework of the maqasidic scheme of benefits and harms, any practice where benefits are substantial is considered permissible, while those promoting harms are prohibited. The (...)
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  22. Volker Nienhaus (2011). Islamic Finance Ethics and Shari'Ah Law in the Aftermath of the Crisis: Concept and Practice of Shari'Ah Compliant Finance. Ethical Perspectives 18 (4):591-623.score: 9.0
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  23. Aidan O'Neill (2009). Roman Catholicism and the Temptation of Shari'A. Common Knowledge 15 (2):269-315.score: 9.0
    The question posed in this article is whether Catholics can fully, unreservedly, and conscientiously carry out their duties as citizens and as holders of their various public offices (legislative, judicial and executive) of the State, in accordance with the laws and constitution of the democratic and pluralist States in which they live. My concern—as a practicing Catholic and a practicing lawyer—is that the increasingly fierce Church criticism, which arose during the papacy of John Paul II and now of Benedict XVI, (...)
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  24. Clare Palmer (1995). Larry May and Shari Collins Sharratt, Eds., Applied Ethics: A Multicultural Approach Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 15 (1):58-60.score: 9.0
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  25. B. Petersson (2003). Politics Without a Past. The Absence of History in Postcommunist Nationalism. By Shari J. Cohen. The European Legacy 8 (1):117-117.score: 9.0
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  26. Anne Savage (2003). Shari Horner, The Discourse of Enclosure: Representing Women in Old English Literature. (SUNY Series in Medieval Studies.) Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 2001. Pp. Ix, 207; 1 Black-and-White Figure. [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (2):520-523.score: 9.0
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  27. Judith Scheele (2012). Rightful Measures : Irrigation, Land, and the Shari'Ah in the Algerian Touat. In Paul Dresch & Hannah Skoda (eds.), Legalism: Anthropology and History. Oxford University Press.score: 9.0
     
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  28. Ron Shaham (forthcoming). A Woman's Place: A Confrontation with Bedouin Custom in the Sharīʿa Court. Journal of the American Oriental Society.score: 9.0
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  29. Sohail H. Hashmi (2010). The Rights of Muslim Women: A Comment on Irene Oh's the Rights of God. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):588-593.score: 6.0
    This review of Irene Oh's The Rights of God focuses on women's rights in Islamic theory and practice. Oh suggests that religious establishments, and the texts they disseminate, often press believers to recognize and reject social problems, such as racial and gender discrimination. Islamic scholars and texts have played a more ambiguous role in efforts to recognize women's rights within Muslim states. Modernist intellectuals have used Islamic texts to support the advancement of women's rights, but members of the more conservative (...)
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  30. Hadassa A. Noorda (2012). The Islamic Law of War – Justifications and Regulations. Journal of Military Ethics 11 (1):67-69.score: 6.0
    Book Review: Ahmed Al Dawoody, The Islamic Law of War - Justifications and Regulations -.
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  31. John Kelsay (2005). Democratic Virtue, Comparative Ethics, and Contemporary Islam. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (4):697-707.score: 6.0
    This essay illustrates the kind of moral analysis Jeffrey Stout advocates in "Democracy and Tradition" by way of examining a conversation among Muslims that took place between June and December 2002. Their debate centers on al-Qaìda's legitimacy as God's chosen defender of Islam, which is called into question due to the tension between al-Qaìda's military tactics and the concepts of honorable combat held within the Islamic tradition. This giving and taking of reasons in both defense and detraction of al-Qaìda's tactics (...)
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  32. Shari Stone-Mediatore (2011). A Not-So-Global Ethics. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 18 (1):43-57.score: 3.0
    This paper traces the ethnocentric structure of U.S.-published anthologies in global ethics and related fields and it examines the ethical and philosophical implications of such ethnocentrism. The author argues that the ethnocentric structure of prominent work in global ethics not only impairs the field's ability to prepare students for global citizenship but contributes to the ideological processes that maintain global inequities. In conclusion, the author makes a case that fuller engagement with global-South and indigenous writers on global issues can encourage (...)
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  33. Shari Stone-Mediatore (2009). Cross-Border Feminism: Shifting the Terms of Debate for Us and European Feminists. Journal of Global Ethics 5 (1):57 – 71.score: 3.0
    Recent decades of women's rights advocacy have produced numerous regional and international agreements for protecting women's security, including a UN convention that affirms the state's responsibility to protect key gender-specific rights, with no exceptions on the basis of culture or religion. At the same time, however, the focus on universal women's rights has enabled influential feminists in the United States to view women's rights in opposition to culture, and most often in opposition to other people's cultures. Not surprisingly, then, feminists (...)
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  34. Shari Stone-Mediatore (2010). Epistemologies of Discomfort: What Military-Family Anti-War Activists Can Teach Us About Knowledge of Violence. Studies in Social Justice 4 (1):25-45.score: 3.0
    This paper examines the particular relevance of feminist critiques of epistemic authority in contexts of institutionalized violence. Reading feminist criticism of “experts” together with theorists of institutionalized violence, Stone-Mediatore argues that typical expert modes of thinking are incapable of rigorous knowledge of institutionalized violence because such knowledge requires a distinctive kind of thinking-within-discomfort for which conventionally trained experts are ill-suited. The author demonstrates the limitations of “expert” modes of thinking with reference to writings on the Iraq war by Michael Ignatieff (...)
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  35. Shari Stone-Mediatore (1998). Chandra Mohanty and the Revaluing of "Experience". Hypatia 13 (2):116 - 133.score: 3.0
    Joan Scott's poststructuralist critique of experience demonstrates the dangers of empiricist narratives of experience but leaves feminists without a meaningful way to engage nonempiricist, experience-oriented texts, texts that constitute many women's primary means of taking control over their own representation. Using Chandra Mohanty's analysis of the role of writing in Third World feminisms, I articulate a concept of experience that incorporates poststructuralist insights while enabling a more responsible reading of Third World women's narratives.
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  36. Shari M. Huhndorf & Scott L. Pratt (2001). Cultural Cartographies: The Logic of Domination and Native Cultural Survival. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 14 (4):268-285.score: 3.0
  37. Shari Collins-Chobanian (1999). Faces of Environmental Racism: Confronting Issues of Global Justice. Environmental Ethics 21 (3):325-328.score: 3.0
  38. Andrew F. March, Sources of Moral Obligation to Non-Muslims in the Fiqh Al-Aqalliyyat (Jurisprudence of Muslim Minorities) Discourse.score: 3.0
    This article surveys four approaches to moral obligation to non-Muslims found in Islamic legal thought. The first three approaches I refer to in this article as the "revelatory-deontological," the "contractualist-constructivist" and the "consequentialist-utilitarian." The main argument of this article is that present in many of the contemporary works on the "jurisprudence of Muslim minorities" (fiqh al-aqalliyyat) is an attempt to provide an Islamic foundation for a relatively thick and rich relationship of moral obligation and solidarity with non-Muslims. This attempt takes (...)
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  39. Shari Collins-Chobanian (2001). A Proposal for Environmental Labels: Informing Consumers of the Real Costs of Consumption. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (3):334–356.score: 3.0
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  40. John Kelsay (2003). Al-Shaybani and the Islamic Law of War. Journal of Military Ethics 2 (1):63-75.score: 3.0
    One of the ways Islamic tradition addresses questions of military ethics is through inquiries into the shari'a, indicating the ideal way of life and usually rendered as Islamic 'law'. Discussion of the shari?a includes an extended conversation concerning the justification and conduct of war. The work of al-Shaybani (d. 804) and other early scholars in the Hanafi school illustrates an important moment in this conversation, establishing precedents to which subsequent generations of Muslims (including contemporary Muslims) must respond. Further, (...)
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  41. Tomis Kapitan, Reason and Flexibility in Islam.score: 3.0
    The role of reason, and its embodiment in philosophical-scientific theorizing, is always a troubling one for religious traditions. The deep emotional needs that religion strives to satisfy seem ever linked to an attitudes of acceptance, belief, or trust, yet, in its theoretical employment, reason functions as a critic as much as it does a creator, and in the special fields of metaphysics and epistemology its critical arrows are sometimes aimed at long-standing cherished beliefs. Understandably, the mere approach to these beliefs (...)
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  42. Shari Stone-Mediatore (1996). Book Review: Lisa Jane Disch. Hannah Arendt and the Limits of Philosophy. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994. [REVIEW] Hypatia 11 (3):164-168.score: 3.0
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  43. Shari Collins-Chobanian (2000). Beyond Sax and Welfare Interests. Environmental Ethics 22 (2):133-148.score: 3.0
    In “The Search for Environmental Rights,” Joseph Sax argues that each individual should have, as a right, freedom from environmental hazards and access to environmental benefits, but he makes clear that environmental rights do not exist and their recognition would truly be a novel step. Sax states that environmental rights are different from existing human rights and argues that the closest analogy is welfare interests. In arguing for environmental rights, I follow Sax’s direction and draw from the work of those (...)
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  44. Aasim I. Padela (2013). Islamic Bioethics: Between Sacred Law, Lived Experiences, and State Authority. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (2):65-80.score: 3.0
    There is burgeoning interest in the field of “Islamic” bioethics within public and professional circles, and both healthcare practitioners and academic scholars deploy their respective expertise in attempts to cohere a discipline of inquiry that addresses the needs of contemporary bioethics stakeholders while using resources from within the Islamic ethico-legal tradition. This manuscript serves as an introduction to the present thematic issue dedicated to Islamic bioethics. Using the collection of papers as a guide the paper outlines several critical questions that (...)
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  45. Shari Collins-Chobanian (2000). Environmental Injustices, Political Struggles. Environmental Ethics 22 (3):319-322.score: 3.0
  46. Mary R. Rose, Christopher G. Ellison & Shari Seidman Diamond, Preferences for Juries Over Judges Across Racial and Ethnic Groups.score: 3.0
    Prior studies have shown a general preference among citizens for juries over judges. Researchers, however, have not considered whether race and ethnicity modify this preference. We hypothesized that minorities (African-Americans, Hispanics), who generally express less trust in the legal system, may also express less trust in juries than non-Hispanic whites. We asked a representative sample of 1,465 residents of Texas to state whether they would prefer a jury or a judge to be the decision maker in four hypothetical circumstances. Consistent (...)
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  47. Shari Stone-Mediatore (2004). Women's Rights and Cultural Differences. Studies in Practical Philosophy 4 (2):111-133.score: 3.0
    The rights of women in fundamentalist Muslim countries has become a cause celebre for many North American women; however, the problem of how to balance respect for women's rights and respect for cultural differences remains in dispute, even within feminist theory. This paper explores how U.S. feminists who are serious about supporting the struggles of women across cultural borders might best adjudicate the seeming tension between women's rights and cultural autonomy. Upon examining 4 representative approaches to this problem, the paper (...)
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  48. Renae A. Streifel, Bethany L. Beebe, Shari R. Veil & Timothy L. Sellnow (2006). Significant Choice and Crisis Decision Making: Meritcare's Public Communication in the Fen–Phen Case. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 69 (4):389 - 397.score: 3.0
    This study examines the communication strategies employed by MeritCare’s public relations staff during the fen–phen case. The ethic of significant choice was the primary lens for the study. The study revealed that MeritCare’s public relations staff members believed they did, in fact, follow the ethic of significant choice. Specifically, they perceived that the biases held by staff helped maintain the public’s safety as the primary issue during the fen–phen events. They also believed that their communication strategies allowed them to avoid (...)
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  49. Shari Collins & Eric Comerford (2012). Anonymous Sperm Donation. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):213-230.score: 3.0
    Anonymous sperm donation offspring often yearn for information about their biological fathers, and as they come of age that yearning increases in intensity. We first explore will and interest theory regarding this desire to know one’s heritage and argue that both theories lead to a right of the offspring to know. We then turn to the donor contract, look at the inconsistencies between donor ability to eschew parental responsibility compared to other biological fathers, and argue that there should be a (...)
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  50. Noor Munirah Isa, Azizan Baharuddin, Saadan Man & Chang Lee Wei (2014). Bioethics in the Malay‐Muslim Community in Malaysia: A Study on the Formulation of Fatwa on Genetically Modified Food by the National Fatwa Council. Developing World Bioethics 14 (2).score: 3.0
    The field of bioethics aims to ensure that modern scientific and technological advancements have been primarily developed for the benefits of humankind. This field is deeply rooted in the traditions of Western moral philosophy and socio-political theory. With respect to the view that the practice of bioethics in certain community should incorporate religious and cultural elements, this paper attempts to expound bioethical tradition of the Malay-Muslim community in Malaysia, with shedding light on the mechanism used by the National Fatwa Council (...)
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