Search results for 'Shawn Gorman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  10
    Shawn Gorman (2009). On the Problem of Origin in Sartre's Phenomenology: Essentialism Versus Unlimited Semiosis. Sartre Studies International 15 (1):39-53.
    One of the basic intuitions guiding Sartre's phenomenological works is that phenomena cannot be reduced to essences that are separate from appearances. Such a separation leads to a type of semiotic profusion that Sartre criticizes in L'Etre et le néant by evoking the example of Proust. Sartre's ontology must avoid this infinite proliferation of meaning without falling into a type of essentialism where things are merely what they appear to be. Sartre's references to Proust demonstrate not only the pitfalls of (...)
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  2. W. M. Gorman (1996). Separability and Aggregation: The Collected Works of W. M. Gorman, Volume I. Oxford University Press Uk.
    W.M. Gorman has been a major figure in the development of economies during the past forty years. His publications on separability, aggregation, duality and the modelling of consumer demand are recognized as fundamental contributions to economic theory. Many of his unpublished papers have achieved similar status as privately-circulated classics.This volume brings together for the first time all Gorman's important work, much of which has never been published before, on aggregation across commodities and agents, including separability, budgeting, representative agents, (...)
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  3. J. L. Gorman (1987). Philosophical Confidence: J. L. Gorman. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 22:71-79.
    Analytical philosophers, if they are true to their training, never forget the first lesson of analytical philosophy: philosophers have no moral authority. In so far as analytical philosophers believe this, they find it easy to live with. For them even to assert, let alone successfully lay claim to, moral authority would require, first, hard work of some non-analytical and probably mistaken kind and, secondly, personality traits of leadership or confidence or even charisma, which philosophers may accidentally have but which they (...)
     
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  4.  96
    Michael Gorman (2005). Augustine's Use of Neoplatonism in Confessions VII: A Response to Peter King. Modern Schoolman 82 (3):227-233.
    A modified version of Michael Gorman's comments on Peter King’s paper at the 2004 Henle Conference. Above all, an account of Augustine’s purposes in discussing Neoplatonism in Confessions VII, showing why Augustine does not tell us certain things we wish he would. In my commentary I will address the following topics: (i) what it means to speak of the philosophically interesting points in Augustine; (ii) whether Confessions VII is really about the Trinity; (iii) Augustine‘s intentions in Confessions VII; (iv) (...)
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  5.  4
    Jonathan Gorman (2003). Rights and Reason. Acumen/McGill-Queen's University Press.
    In "Rights and Reason", Jonathan Gorman sets discussion of the 'rights debate' within a wide-ranging philosophical and historical framework. Drawing on positions in epistemology, metaphysics and the theory of human nature as well as on the ideas of canonical thinkers, Gorman provides an introduction to the philosophy of rights that is firmly grounded in the history of philosophy as well as the concerns of contemporary political and legal philosophy. The book gives readers a clear sense that, just as (...)
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  6.  16
    Ben Gorman (2012). Review of Philosophy in Children's Literature. [REVIEW] Questions 12:17-18.
    Ben Gorman reviews Philosophy in Children’s Literature by Peter R. Costello.
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  7. Sara E. Gorman & Jack M. Gorman (2016). Denying to the Grave: Why We Ignore the Facts That Will Save Us. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Why do some parents refuse to vaccinate their children? Why do some keep guns at home, despite scientific evidence of risk to their family members? And why do people use antibiotics for illnesses they can't possibly alleviate? When it comes to health, many people insist that science is wrong, that the evidence is incomplete or inconclusive, and that unidentified hazards lurk everywhere to harm us.In Denying to the Grave, authors Sara and Jack Gorman explore the psychology of health science (...)
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  8. Jonathan Gorman (2007). Historical Judgement. Acumen/McGill-Queen's University Press.
    The historical profession is not noted for examining its own methodologies. Indeed, most historians are averse to historical theory. In "Historical Judgement" Jonathan Gorman's response to this state of affairs is to argue that if we want to characterize a discipline, we need to look to persons who successfully occupy the role of being practitioners of that discipline. So to model historiography we must do so from the views of historians. Gorman begins by showing what it is to (...)
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  9. Jonathan Gorman (2008). Historical Judgement. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    The historical profession is not noted for examining its own methodologies. Indeed, most historians are averse to historical theory. In "Historical Judgement" Jonathan Gorman's response to this state of affairs is to argue that if we want to characterize a discipline, we need to look to persons who successfully occupy the role of being practitioners of that discipline. So to model historiography we must do so from the views of historians. Gorman begins by showing what it is to (...)
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  10. Jonathan Gorman (2008). Historical Judgement. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    The historical profession is not noted for examining its own methodologies. Indeed, most historians are averse to historical theory. In "Historical Judgement" Jonathan Gorman's response to this state of affairs is to argue that if we want to characterize a discipline, we need to look to persons who successfully occupy the role of being practitioners of that discipline. So to model historiography we must do so from the views of historians. Gorman begins by showing what it is to (...)
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  11. Jonathan Gorman (2014). Historical Judgement. Routledge.
    The historical profession is not noted for examining its own methodologies. Indeed, most historians are averse to historical theory. In "Historical Judgement" Jonathan Gorman's response to this state of affairs is to argue that if we want to characterize a discipline, we need to look to persons who successfully occupy the role of being practitioners of that discipline. So to model historiography we must do so from the views of historians. Gorman begins by showing what it is to (...)
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  12. Jonathan Gorman (2007). Historical Judgement: The Limits of Historiographical Choice. Routledge.
    The historical profession is not noted for examining its own methodologies. Indeed, most historians are averse to historical theory. In "Historical Judgement" Jonathan Gorman's response to this state of affairs is to argue that if we want to characterize a discipline, we need to look to persons who successfully occupy the role of being practitioners of that discipline. So to model historiography we must do so from the views of historians. Gorman begins by showing what it is to (...)
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  13. Jonathan Gorman (2014). Rights and Reason: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Rights. Routledge.
    In "Rights and Reason", Jonathan Gorman sets discussion of the 'rights debate' within a wide-ranging philosophical and historical framework. Drawing on positions in epistemology, metaphysics and the theory of human nature as well as on the ideas of canonical thinkers, Gorman provides an introduction to the philosophy of rights that is firmly grounded in the history of philosophy as well as the concerns of contemporary political and legal philosophy. The book gives readers a clear sense that, just as (...)
     
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  14. Jonathan Gorman (2003). Rights and Reason: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Rights. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    In "Rights and Reason", Jonathan Gorman sets discussion of the 'rights debate' within a wide-ranging philosophical and historical framework. Drawing on positions in epistemology, metaphysics and the theory of human nature as well as on the ideas of canonical thinkers, Gorman provides an introduction to the philosophy of rights that is firmly grounded in the history of philosophy as well as the concerns of contemporary political and legal philosophy. The book gives readers a clear sense that, just as (...)
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  15. Robert L. Gorman (1978). The Dual Vision. Alfred Schutz and the Myth of Phenomenological Social Science. Human Studies 1 (3):289-299.
    This study, originally published in 1977, focuses on a critical examination of the life-work of Alfred Schutz, the most important and influential ‘father’ of several recent schools of empirical social research. The author shows why Shutz and his followers fail in their attempts to ‘humanize’ empirical social science. The problems they encounter, he argues, are due to their attempt to achieve a methodological synthesis of self-determining subjectivity and empirical criteria of validation, based on Schutz’s heuristic adoption of relevant ideas from (...)
     
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  16. Robert Gorman (2013). The Dual Vision: Alfred Schutz and the Myth of Phenomenological Social Science. Routledge.
    This study, originally published in 1977, focuses on a critical examination of the life-work of Alfred Schutz, the most important and influential ‘father’ of several recent schools of empirical social research. The author shows why Shutz and his followers fail in their attempts to ‘humanize’ empirical social science. The problems they encounter, he argues, are due to their attempt to achieve a methodological synthesis of self-determining subjectivity and empirical criteria of validation, based on Schutz’s heuristic adoption of relevant ideas from (...)
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  17. Robert Gorman (2015). The Dual Vision: Alfred Schutz and the Myth of Phenomenological Social Science. Routledge.
    This study, originally published in 1977, focuses on a critical examination of the life-work of Alfred Schutz, the most important and influential ‘father’ of several recent schools of empirical social research. The author shows why Shutz and his followers fail in their attempts to ‘humanize’ empirical social science. The problems they encounter, he argues, are due to their attempt to achieve a methodological synthesis of self-determining subjectivity and empirical criteria of validation, based on Schutz’s heuristic adoption of relevant ideas from (...)
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  18.  4
    Daniel Gorman (2012). The Emergence of International Society in the 1920s. Cambridge University Press.
    Chronicling the emergence of an international society in the 1920s, Daniel Gorman describes how the shock of the First World War gave rise to a broad array of overlapping initiatives in international cooperation. Though national rivalries continued to plague world politics, ordinary citizens and state officials found common causes in politics, religion, culture and sport with peers beyond their borders. The League of Nations, the turn to a less centralized British Empire, the beginning of an international ecumenical movement, international (...)
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  19.  45
    Harry Collins, Robert Evans & Mike Gorman (2007). Trading Zones and Interactional Expertise. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (4):657-666.
    The phrase ‘trading zone’ is often used to denote any kind of interdisciplinary partnership in which two or more perspectives are combined and a new, shared language develops. In this paper we distinguish between different types of trading zone by asking whether the collaboration is co-operative or coerced and whether the end-state is a heterogeneous or homogeneous culture. In so doing, we find that the voluntary development of a new language community—what we call an inter-language trading zone—represents only one of (...)
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  20.  93
    Michael J. Gorman (forthcoming). Book Review: Romans in Full Circle: A History of Interpretation. [REVIEW] Interpretation 61 (3):340-341.
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  21. Michael Gorman (2005). The Essential and the Accidental. Ratio 18 (3):276–289.
    The distinction between the essential and the accidental characteristics of a thing should be understood not in modal terms (the received view) nor in definitional terms (Fine’s recent proposal) but as follows: an essential characteristic of a thing is one that is not explained by any other of that thing’s characteristics, and an accidental characteristic of a thing is one that is so explained. Various versions of this proposal can be formulated.
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  22.  54
    Michael J. Gorman (forthcoming). Book Review: The Word In This World: Essays in New Testament Exegesis and Theology. [REVIEW] Interpretation 59 (1):90-90.
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  23.  4
    M. Gorman, R. Tweney, D. Gooding & A. Kincannon (eds.) (2005). Scientific and Technological Thinking. Erlbaum.
    This book describes empirically ways to analyze and then to effectually utilize cognitive processes to advance discovery and invention in the sciences. It also explains how to teach these principles to students.
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  24.  40
    Daphna Heller, Kristen S. Gorman & Michael K. Tanenhaus (2012). To Name or to Describe: Shared Knowledge Affects Referential Form. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (2):290-305.
    The notion of common ground is important for the production of referring expressions: In order for a referring expression to be felicitous, it has to be based on shared information. But determining what information is shared and what information is privileged may require gathering information from multiple sources, and constantly coordinating and updating them, which might be computationally too intensive to affect the earliest moments of production. Previous work has found that speakers produce overinformative referring expressions, which include privileged names, (...)
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  25. Michael J. Gorman (forthcoming). Book Review: Paul: In Fresh Perspective. [REVIEW] Interpretation 61 (2):232-232.
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  26.  7
    Michael E. Gorman, James F. Groves & Jeff Shrager (2004). Societal Dimensions of Nanotechnology as a Trading Zone: Results From a Pilot Project. In Baird D. (ed.), Discovering the Nanoscale. Ios 63--77.
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  27. Michael J. Gorman (forthcoming). Book Review: Can I Get a Witness? Reading Revelation Through African American Culture. [REVIEW] Interpretation 60 (4):471-471.
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  28.  98
    Michael J. Gorman (forthcoming). Book Review: Remembering Jesus: Christian Community, Scripture, and the Moral Life. [REVIEW] Interpretation 57 (4):434-437.
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  29. Ulf Görman, Willem B. Drees, Niels Henrik Gregersen & European Society for the Study of Science and Theology (2000). The Human Person in Science and Theology. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  30.  95
    Michael J. Gorman (forthcoming). Book Review: Philippians: A Commentary in the Wesleyan Tradition. [REVIEW] Interpretation 65 (1):96-98.
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  31.  4
    Ryan R. Gorman (2010). War and the Virtues in Aquinas's Ethical Thought. Journal of Military Ethics 9 (3):245-261.
    This article argues that Thomas Aquinas's virtue ethics approach to just war theory provides a solid ethical foundation for thinking about the problem of war. After briefly indicating some shortcomings of contemporary views of international justice, including pacifism, legalism, progressivism, realism, pragmatism, and consequentialism, the article examines Aquinas's question ?On War? in the Summa Theologiae. It then attempts to show that Aquinas's thinking on war is rooted in his understanding of the virtues by providing a brief overview of how the (...)
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  32.  93
    Michael J. Gorman (forthcoming). Book Review: Beginning From Jerusalem: Christianity in the Making, Vol. 2. [REVIEW] Interpretation 64 (3):302-304.
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  33.  12
    Michael Gorman, Patricia Werhane & Nathan Swami (2009). Moral Imagination, Trading Zones, and the Role of the Ethicist in Nanotechnology. NanoEthics 3 (3):185-195.
    The societal and ethical impacts of emerging technological and business systems cannot entirely be foreseen; therefore, management of these innovations will require at least some ethicists to work closely with researchers. This is particularly critical in the development of new systems because the maximum degrees of freedom for changing technological direction occurs at or just after the point of breakthrough; that is also the point where the long-term implications are hardest to visualize. Recent work on shared expertise in Science & (...)
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  34.  76
    Michael J. Gorman (forthcoming). Book Review: Paul, Apostle of the Living God: Kerygma and Conversion in 2 Corinthians. [REVIEW] Interpretation 56 (2):216-216.
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  35.  76
    Michael Gorman (2006). Independence and Substance. International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (2):147-159.
    The paper takes up a traditional view that has also been a part of some recent analytic metaphysics, namely, the view that substance is to be understood in terms of independence. Taking as my point of departure some recent remarks by Kit Fine, I propose reviving the Aristotelian-scholastic idea that the sense in which substances are independent is that they are non-inherent, and I do so by developing a broad notion of inherence that is more usable in the context (...)
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  36. Michael E. Gorman, Matthew M. Mehalik & Patricia Hogue Werhane (2000). Ethical and Environmental Challenges to Engineering.
     
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  37.  67
    Michael J. Gorman (forthcoming). Romans 13:8–14. Interpretation 62 (2):170-172.
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  38.  88
    Michael Gorman (2003). Hugh of Saint Victor. In Noone Gracia (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Philosophy in the Middle Ages. Blackwell
    An overview of Hugh’s thought, focusing on philosophical issues. Specifically it gives a summary of his overall vision; the sources he worked from; his understanding of: the division of the science, biblical interpretation, God, creation, providence and evil, human nature and ethics, salvation; and his spiritual teachings.
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  39. Michael E. Gorman (1992). Simulating Science Heuristics, Mental Models, and Technoscientific Thinking. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  40.  42
    Michael Gorman (2011). Incarnation. In Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas. Oxford University Press
    According to Christian belief, Jesus Christ is a divine person who became “incarnate,” i.e., who became human. A key event in the second act of the drama of creation and redemption, the incarnation could not have failed to interest Aquinas, and he discusses it in a number of places. A proper understanding of what he thought about it is thus part of any complete understanding of his work. It is, furthermore, a window into his ideas on a variety of other (...)
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  41.  21
    Veronica Johansson, Martin Garwicz, Martin Kanje, Helena Röcklinsberg, Jens Schouenborg, Anders Tingström & Ulf Görman (2013). Beyond Blind Optimism and Unfounded Fears: Deep Brain Stimulation for Treatment Resistant Depression. Neuroethics 6 (3):457-471.
    The introduction of new medical treatments based on invasive technologies has often been surrounded by both hopes and fears. Hope, since a new intervention can create new opportunities either in terms of providing a cure for the disease or impairment at hand; or as alleviation of symptoms. Fear, since an invasive treatment involving implanting a medical device can result in unknown complications such as hardware failure and undesirable medical consequences. However, hopes and fears may also arise due to the cultural (...)
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  42.  98
    M. J. Gorman (2006). Book Review: The Soul of the Embryo: An Enquiry Into the Status of the Human Embryo in the Christian Tradition. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 19 (1):125-128.
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  43.  46
    Michael Gorman (2000). Christ as Composite According to Aquinas. Traditio 55:143-157.
    In this paper I explain Thomas Aquinas's view that Christ is a composite person, and then I explain the role of Christ's compositeness in Thomas‘s solutions to a range of Christological problems. On the topics I will be discussing, Thomas‘s views did not change significantly over the course of his career; for the sake of simplicity, then, I will focus on texts from the Summa theologiae, citing parallels in the notes.
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  44.  24
    Michael Gorman (2011). Personhood, Potentiality, and Normativity. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):483-498.
    The lives of persons are valuable, but are all humans persons? Some humans—the immature, the damaged, and the defective—are not capable, here and now, of engaging in the rational activities characteristic of persons, and for this reason, one might call their personhood into question. A standard way of defendingit is by appeal to potentiality: we know they are persons because we know they have the potentiality to engage in rational activities. In this paper I develop acomplementary strategy based on normativity. (...)
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  45.  31
    Michael Gorman (2006). Substance and Identity-Dependence. Philosophical Papers 35 (1):103-118.
    There is no consensus on how to define substance, but one popular view is that substances are entities that are independent in some sense or other. E. J. Lowe’s version of this approach stresses that substances are not dependent on other particulars for their identity. I develop the meaning of this proposal, defend it against some criticisms, and then show that others do require that the theory be modified.
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  46.  8
    Robert A. Gorman (1977). The Dual Vision: Alfred Schutz and the Myth of Phenomenological Social Science. Routledge & K. Paul.
    Introduction The contemporary study of society is fired by our quest for scientific truth. The very spirit of our age is tangible evidence ...
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  47.  16
    Aloysia M. Gorman (1961). Recognition Memory for Nouns as a Function of Abstractness and Frequency. Journal of Experimental Psychology 61 (1):23.
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  48. Michael Gorman (2006). Talking About Intentional Objects. Dialectica 60 (2):135-144.
    Discusses the old problem of how to characterize apparently intentional states that appear to lack objects. In tandem with critically discussing a recent proposal by Tim Crane, I develop the line of reasoning according to which talking about intentional objects is really a way of talking about intentional states—in particular, it’s a way of talking about their satisfaction-conditions.
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  49.  86
    Michael Gorman (2012). On Substantial Independence: A Reply to Patrick Toner. Philosophical Studies 159 (2):293-297.
    Patrick Toner has recently criticized accounts of substance provided by Kit Fine, E. J. Lowe, and the author, accounts which say (to a first approximation) that substances cannot depend on things other than their own parts. On Toner’s analysis, the inclusion of this parts exception results in a disjunctive definition of substance rather than a unified account. In this paper (speaking only for myself, but in a way that would, I believe, support the other authors that Toner discusses), I (...)
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  50.  6
    Michael Gorman (2011). Doing Science, Technology and Society in the National Science Foundation. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):839-849.
    The author describes his efforts to become a participant observer while he was a Program Director at the NSF. He describes his plans for keeping track of his reflections and his goals before he arrived at NSF, then includes sections from his reflective diary and comments after he had completed his two-year rotation. The influx of rotators means the NSF has to be an adaptive, learning organization but there are bureaucratic obstacles in the way.
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