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  1. Sheila Jasanoff (2012). Science and Public Reason. Routledge.
    This collection of essays by Sheila Jasanoff explores how democratic governments construct public reason, that is, the forms of evidence and argument used in making state decisions accountable to citizens.
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  2. Sheila Jasanoff (2011). Constitutional Moments in Governing Science and Technology. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):621-638.
    Scholars in science and technology studies have recently been called upon to advise governments on the design of procedures for public engagement. Any such instrumental function should be carried out consistently with STS’s interpretive and normative obligations as a social science discipline. This article illustrates how such threefold integration can be achieved by reviewing current US participatory politics against a 70-year backdrop of tacit constitutional developments in governing science and technology. Two broad cycles of constitutional adjustment are discerned: the first (...)
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  3. Peter Dear & Sheila Jasanoff (2010). Dismantling Boundaries in Science and Technology Studies. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 101:759-774.
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  4. Sheila Jasanoff (2010). A Field of its Own: The Emergence of Science and Technology Studies. In Robert Frodeman, Julie Thompson Klein & Carl Mitcham (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Interdisciplinarity. OUP Oxford
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  5. Sheila Jasanoff & Sang-Hyun Kim (2009). Containing the Atom: Sociotechnical Imaginaries and Nuclear Power in the United States and South Korea. Minerva 47 (2):119-146.
    STS research has devoted relatively little attention to the promotion and reception of science and technology by non-scientific actors and institutions. One consequence is that the relationship of science and technology to political power has tended to remain undertheorized. This article aims to fill that gap by introducing the concept of sociotechnical imaginaries. Through a comparative examination of the development and regulation of nuclear power in the US and South Korea, the article demonstrates the analytic potential of the imaginaries concept. (...)
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  6. Sheila Jasanoff, Michael D. Gordin, Andrew Jewett & Charles Thorpe (2008). A Splintered Function: Fate, Faith, and the Father of the Atomic Bomb. [REVIEW] Metascience 17 (3):351-387.
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  7. Sheila Jasanoff (2006). Technology as a Site and Object of Politics. In Robert E. Goodin & Charles Tilly (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Contextual Political Analysis. Oxford University Press 745--763.
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  8. Sheila Jasanoff (2006). Just Evidence: The Limits of Science in the Legal Process. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 34 (2):328-341.
    Both opponents and proponents of the death penalty express faith in science and in DNA evidence to justify their positions. This article examines the production of forensic evidence as a social activity and suggests that tendencies toward bias and error may not apply symmetrically in inculpation and exoneration contexts.
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  9. Sheila Jasanoff (ed.) (2004). States of Knowledge: The Co-Production of Science and Social Order. Routledge.
    In the past twenty years, the field of science and technology studies (S&TS) has made considerable progress toward illuminating the relationship between scientific knowledge and political power. These insights have not yet been synthesized or presented in a form that systematically highlights the connections between S&TS and other social sciences. This timely collection of essays by some of the leading scholars in the field attempts to fill that gap. The book develops the theme of "co-production", showing how scientific knowledge both (...)
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  10. Sheila Jasanoff (2004). What Inquiring Minds Should Want to Know. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (1):149-157.
  11. Sheila Jasanoff (2003). Technologies of Humility: Citizen Participation in Governing Science. Minerva 41 (3):223--244.
    Building on recent theories ofscience in society, such as that provided bythe `Mode 2' framework, this paper argues thatgovernments should reconsider existingrelations among decision-makers, experts, andcitizens in the management of technology.Policy-makers need a set of `technologies ofhumility' for systematically assessing theunknown and the uncertain. Appropriate focalpoints for such modest assessments are framing,vulnerability, distribution, and learning.
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  12. Sheila Jasanoff (2002). Innovation and Integrity in Biomedical Research. In Ruth Ellen Bulger, Elizabeth Heitman & Stanley Joel Reiser (eds.), The Ethical Dimensions of the Biological and Health Sciences. Cambridge University Press 68--71.
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  13. Sheila Jasanoff (2000). Talking About Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (4):525-528.
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  14. Sheila Jasanoff (1997). Numbers You Can Trust? Metascience 6 (1):82-87.
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  15. Sheila Jasanoff (1996). Is Science Socially Constructed—and Can It Still Inform Public Policy? Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (3):263-276.
    This paper addresses, and seeks to correct, some frequent misunderstandings concerning the claim that science is socially constructed. It describes several features of scientific inquiry that have been usefully illuminated by constructivist studies of science, including the mundane or tacit skills involved in research, the social relationships in scientific laboratories, the causes of scientific controversy, and the interconnection of science and culture. Social construction, the paper argues, should be seen not as an alternative to but an enhancement of scientists’ own (...)
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  16. Sheila Jasanoff (1987). Reviewing the Reviewers A Difficult Balance: Editorial Peer Review in Medicine Stephen Lock. BioScience 37 (4):291-293.
  17. Sheila Jasanoff (1987). Reviewing the Reviewers. BioScience 37 (4):291-293.
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