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Profile: Sheila Lintott (Bucknell University)
  1. Sheila Lintott & Maureen Sander-Staudt (eds.) (2012/2011). Philosophical Inquiries Into Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Mothering: Maternal Subjects. Routledge.
    Philosophical inquiry into pregnancy, childbirth, and mothering is a growing area of interest to academic philosophers. This volume brings together a diverse group of philosophers to speak about topics in this reemerging area of philosophical inquiry, taking up new themes, such as maternal aesthetics, and pursuing old ones in new ways, such as investigating stepmothering as it might inform and ground an ethics of care. The theoretical foci of the book include feminist, existential, ethical, aesthetic, phenomenological, social and political theories. (...)
     
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  2. Sheila Lintott (2011). Preservation, Passivity, and Pessimism. Ethics and the Environment 16 (2):95-114.
    Whether it's the 2010 BP oil spill or mountaintop removal in the Appalachians, it is clear that nature has been degraded and human activity threatens further degradation. Sound theoretical guidance is desperately needed to inform sound practice. Environmental philosophy is a good place to look for guidance, particularly to debates concerning restoration. These debates often focus on values promulgated via restoration. Questions are asked about the value produced by restoration efforts: Does restored nature have the same quality or quantity of (...)
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  3. Sheila Lintott (2010). Feminist Art and the Maternal by Liss, Andrea. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (1):74-76.
  4. Sheila Lintott (2010). Feminist Aesthetics and the Neglect of Natural Beauty. Environmental Values 19 (3):315 - 333.
    Feminist philosophy has taken too long to engage seriously with aesthetics and has been even slower in confronting natural beauty in particular. There are various possible reasons for this neglect, including the relative youth of feminist aesthetics, the possibility that feminist philosophy is not relevant to nature aesthetics, the claim that natural beauty is not a serious topic, hesitation among feminists to perpetuate women's associations with beauty and nature, and that the neglect may be merely apparent. Discussing each of these (...)
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  5. Sheila Lintott (ed.) (2010). Motherhood - Philosophy for Everyone: The Birth of Wisdom. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Each book in this series takes a easy-to-understand philosophic look at a particular aspect of everyday life or pop culture.
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  6. Sheila Lintott (2009). Epistemology at 20,000 Feet. In Noël Carroll & Lester H. Hunt (eds.), Philosophy in the Twilight Zone. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  7. Sheila Lintott (2009). Encountering Nature. Environmental Ethics 31 (3):323-326.
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  8. Sheila Lintott (2009). Yuriko Saito, Everyday Aesthetics. Philosophy in Review 29 (5):371.
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  9. Sheila Lintott (2007). Ethically Evaluating Land Art: Is It Worth It? Ethics, Place and Environment 10 (3):263 – 277.
    Land art requires careful evaluation when assessing its aesthetic and ethical value. Critics of land art charge that it is unethical in that it uses nature without such use being justified by some future good. Other critics charge that land art harms nature aesthetically. In this essay, the author canvasses these charges and argues that some land art is ethically and aesthetically defensible, and that some has great and rare potential in both realms.
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  10. Sheila Lintott (2006). Toward Eco-Friendly Aesthetics. Environmental Ethics 28 (1):57-76.
    Environmentalists can make individuals more eco-friendly by dispelling many of the myths and misconceptions about the natural world. By learning what in nature is and is not dangerous, and in what contexts the danger is real, individuals can come to aesthetically appreciate seemingly unappreciable nature. Since aesthetic attraction can be an extremely valuable tool for environmentalists, with potentialbeyond that of scientific education, the quest for an eco-friendly is neither unnecessary nor redundant. Rather, an eco-friendly aesthetic ought to be pursued in (...)
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  11. Sheila Lintott (2004). Adjudicating the Debate Over Two Models of Nature Appreciation. Journal of Aesthetic Education 38 (3):52-72.
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  12. Sheila Lintott (2004). The Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (3):301-302.
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  13. Sheila Lintott (2003). Sublime Hunger: A Consideration of Eating Disorders Beyond Beauty. Hypatia 18 (4):65-86.
    : In this paper, I argue that one of the most intense ways women are encouraged to enjoy sublime experiences is via attempts to control their bodies through excessive dieting. If this is so, then the societal-cultural contributions to the problem of eating disorders exceed the perpetuation of a certain beauty ideal to include the almost universal encouragement women receive to diet, coupled with the relative shortage of opportunities women are afforded to experience the sublime.
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  14. Sheila Lintott (2002). When Artists Fail: A Reply to Trivedi. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (1):64-72.
    In a recent article, ‘An Epistemic Dilemma for Actual Intentionalism’, Saam Trivedi argues that the way we ought to interpret artworks is best understood using the model proposed by hypothetical intentionalism. Trivedi alleges that actual intentionalism faces a serious dilemma, the upshot of which is that actual intentionalists must choose between redundancy and indeterminacy. Largely on the basis of this dilemma, he concludes that even if actual intentionalism is descriptively accurate, it is prescriptively untenable. In this essay, I focus on (...)
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