Search results for 'Sheri A. Alpert' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sheri A. Alpert (1996). Doctoral Essays in Computer Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (2):225-247.score: 960.0
    Computer technologies are having a profoundly transforming effect on how the United States federal government operates. As technologies become more sophisticated, Federal agencies are becoming more innovative, devising creative ways to use these technologies for program delivery. One hopes that the near-term effect of these technology applications will be more efficient operation of government, the goal that generally leads to their implementation.
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  2. Sheri Alpert (2008). Neuroethics and Nanoethics: Do We Risk Ethical Myopia? [REVIEW] Neuroethics 1 (1):55-68.score: 450.0
    In recent years, two distinct trajectories of bioethical inquiry have emerged: neuroethics and nanoethics. The former deals with issues in neuroscience, whereas the latter deals with issues in nanoscience and nanotechnology. In both cases, the ethical inquiries have coalesced in response to rapidly increasing scientific and engineering developments in each field. Both also present major issues for contemplation in bioethics. However, the questions are (1) how different are the ethical issues raised, and (2) is it beneficial for neuroethics and nanoethics (...)
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  3. Andrew Fenton & Sheri Alpert (2008). Extending Our View on Using BCIs for Locked-in Syndrome. Neuroethics 1 (2):119-132.score: 450.0
    Locked-in syndrome (LIS) is a severe neurological condition that typically leaves a patient unable to move, talk and, in many cases, initiate communication. Brain Computer Interfaces (or BCIs) promise to enable individuals with conditions like LIS to re-engage with their physical and social worlds. In this paper we will use extended mind theory to offer a way of seeing the potential of BCIs when attached to, or implanted in, individuals with LIS. In particular, we will contend that functionally integrated BCIs (...)
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  4. Sheri Alpert (2008). Privacy Issues in Clinical Genomic Medicine, or Marcus Welby, M.D., Meets the $1000 Genome. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (04):373-384.score: 450.0
    We have all heard a refrain much like this one over the last decade, increasingly so, as the cost of genetic sequencing has been drastically reduced with improvements in associated techniques and technologies. Already, discoveries are being made in laboratories that can help doctors determine from which drug a particular patient will receive the most efficacious treatment. The working presumption is that, eventually, individuals’ genetic sequence information will be included in each of their personal medical records.
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  5. Carol Lynn Alpert (2011). Broadening and Deepening the Impact: A Theoretical Framework for Partnerships Between Science Museums and STEM Research Centres. Social Epistemology 23 (3):267-281.score: 420.0
    The requirement by the National Science Foundation (NSF) that research proposals include plans for “broader impact” activities to foster connections between Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) research and service to society has been controversial since it was first introduced. A chief complaint is that the requirement diverts time and resources from the focus of research and toward activities for which researchers may not be well prepared. This paper describes the theoretical framework underlying a new strategy to pair NSF-funded nano (...)
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  6. Judith L. Alpert (1995). Trauma, Dissociation, and Clinical Study as a Responsible Beginning. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):125-129.score: 360.0
  7. Marc Alpert & Howard Raiffa (1982). A Progress Report on the Training of Probability Assessors. In Daniel Kahneman, Paul Slovic & Amos Tversky (eds.), Judgment Under Uncertainty: Heuristics and Biases. Cambridge University Press. 294--305.score: 360.0
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  8. Sheri Alpert (2007). Total Information Awareness-Forgotten but Not Gone: Lessons for Neuroethics. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):24 – 26.score: 240.0
  9. A. M. Alpert (1980). Knowledge and Cosmos in the Philosophies of Mach and Ch'eng I: An Analysis of the Cognitive Structures of Empiricism in Two Cultures. Philosophy East and West 30 (2):163-179.score: 240.0
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  10. Sheri Alpert (2007). Brain Privacy: How Can We Protect It? American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):70-73.score: 240.0
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  11. N. M. Alpert, D. Amaral, Anderson Jr, J. S. Antrobus, R. Ardila, G. A. Austin, E. Awh, H. P. Bahrick, P. O. Bahnck & M. R. Banaji (1999). Alkon, DL, 150. In Robert L. Solso (ed.), Mind and Brain Sciences in the 21st Century. Cambridge: Mit Press.score: 240.0
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  12. R. P. Abeles, J. Adelson, A. Ahlgren, M. D. S. Ainsworth, G. W. Allport, R. Alpert, D. Anderson, M. Arnold, J. Aronfreed & Averill Jr (1975). The Numbers in Italics Refer to the Pages on Which the Complete References Are Listed. In David J. DePalma & Jeanne M. Foley (eds.), Moral Development: Current Theory and Research. Distributed by Halsted Press.score: 240.0
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  13. N. Alpert, X. Anastassiou-Hadjicharalambous, C. Anderson, S. W. Anderson, B. P. Andrews, L. Angladette, S. H. Anthony, D. A. Baldwin, T. Ball & M. A. Barnett (2012). Alder, AG, 127 Alicke, MD, 283 Allison, SC, 154. In Robyn Langdon & Catriona Mackenzie (eds.), Emotions, Imagination, and Moral Reasoning. Psychology Press.score: 240.0
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  14. Sheri Alpert (1993). Smart Cards, Smarter Policy: Medical Records, Privacy, and Health Care Reform. Hastings Center Report 23 (6):13-23.score: 240.0
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  15. Sven Walter (2010). Locked-in Syndrome, Bci, and a Confusion About Embodied, Embedded, Extended, and Enacted Cognition. Neuroethics 3 (1):61-72.score: 126.0
    In a recent contribution to this journal, Andrew Fenton and Sheri Alpert have argued that the so-called “extended mind hypothesis” allows us to understand why Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) have the potential to change the self of patients suffering from Locked-in syndrome (LIS) by extending their minds beyond their bodies. I deny that this can shed any light on the theoretical, or philosophical, underpinnings of BCIs as a tool for enabling communication with, or bodily action by, patients with (...)
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  16. Murray Alpert & Burt Angrist (2003). The Ketamine Model for Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):82-83.score: 120.0
    This commentary compares clinical aspects of ketamine with the amphetamine model of schizophrenia. Hallucinations and loss of insight, associated with amphetamine, seem more schizophrenia-like. Flat affect encountered with ketamine is closer to the clinical presentation in schizophrenia. We argue that flat affect is not a sign of schizophrenia, but rather, a risk factor for chronic schizophrenia.
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  17. Mark Solovey & Jefferson D. Pooley (2011). The Price of Success: Sociologist Harry Alpert, the NSF's First Social Science Policy Architect. Annals of Science 68 (2):229-260.score: 54.0
    Summary Harry Alpert (1912?1977), the US sociologist, is best-known for his directorship of the National Science Foundation's social science programme in the 1950s. This study extends our understanding of Alpert in two main ways: first, by examining the earlier development of his views and career. Beginning with his 1939 biography of Emile Durkheim, we explore the early development of Alpert's views about foundational questions concerning the scientific status of sociology and social science more generally, proper social science (...)
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  18. Steve Heilig (2000). Ram Dass on Being a Patient. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (03):435-438.score: 36.0
    Ram Dass is one of America's most renowned spiritual teachers. Born Richard Alpert, he received his Ph.D. in psychology from Stanford University and taught there and at Harvard University before going to India and receiving the name Ram Dass () from his guru. He has long been involved in many charitable service organizations, particularly those devoted to providing healthcare for underserved populations. Among his many books are BeHereNow (currently in its fortieth printing), HowCanIHelp, and CompassioninAction; his newest book is (...)
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  19. L. Alpert Judith (1995). Trauma, Dissociation, and Clinical Study as a Responsible Beginning. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):125-129.score: 36.0
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