Search results for 'Sherri Goings' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  39
    Sherri Goings, Kin-Selection: The Rise and Fall of Kin-Cheaters.
    We demonstrate the existence of altruism via kin selection in artificial life and explore its nuances. We do so in the Avida system through a setup that is based on the behavior of colicinogenic bacteria: Organisms can kill unrelated organisms in a given radius but must kill themselves to do so. Initially, we confirm!results found in the bacterial world: Digital organisms do sacrifice themselves for their kin—an extreme example of altruism— and do so more often in structured environments, where kin (...)
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  2.  9
    Richard A. Griggs Richard, D. Platt Stephen, E. Newstead Sherri & L. Jackson (1998). Attentional Factors in a Disjunctive Reasoning Task. Thinking and Reasoning 4 (1):1 – 14.
    Girotto and Legrenzi's 1993 facilitation effect for their SARS version of Wason s THOG problem a disjunctive reasoning task was examined. The effect was not replicated when the standard THOG problem instructions were used in Experiments 1 and 2. However, in Experiment 3 when Girotto and Legrenzi's precise instructions were used, facilitation was observed. Experiment 4 further investigated the role of the type of instructions in the observed facilitation. The results suggest that such facilitation may result from attentional factors rather (...)
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  3.  18
    J. R. Richards (1996). Nephrarious Goings On: Kidney Sales and Moral Arguments. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 21 (4):375-416.
    From all points of the political compass, from widely different groups, have come indignant outcries against the trade in human organs from live vendors. Opponents contend that such practices constitute a morally outrageous and gross exploitation of the poor, inherently coercive and obviously intolerable in any civilized society. This article examines the arguments typically offered in defense of these claims, and finds serious problems with all of them. The prohibition of organ sales is derived not from the principles and argument (...)
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  4.  11
    Julian Baggini (2007). Strange Goings on Down at the Farm. The Philosophers' Magazine 38:18-20.
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  5.  17
    Brian Soucek (2009). Resisting the Itch to Redefine Aesthetics: A Response to Sherri Irvin. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (2):223-226.
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  6.  4
    Reflections on Ian Hacking & Victoria Mcgeer (2010). The Clinical View Versus the Narrative View Individuals with Autism Are Very Much in the Public Eye. These Days, Anyone Versed in the Comings and Goings of Everyday Culture Will Have Heard of Autism (and/or Asperger Syndrome) 1—and Doubtless Knows Something About It. Misconceptions Also Abound. But Given That Autism. [REVIEW] In Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.), Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell
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  7.  3
    Michel Paty (2003). Science and the Comings and Goings of Common Sense. Scientiae Studia 1 (1):9-26.
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  8.  8
    Linda Marie Walker (2006). Of Restless Goings-on, and Actual Dyings. Angelaki 11 (1):117 – 126.
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  9.  5
    Eileen M. Mielenhausen (1991). Comings and Goings: Metaphors and Linear and Cyclical Movement in Leguin's Always Coming Home. Utopian Studies 3:99-105.
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  10. I. L. Hruska (2004). Goings-on in Czech Ontology: Controversies About Myths or Reality? Filosoficky Casopis 52 (1):123-127.
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  11. Richard Wunderli (1998). Sherri Olson, A Chronicle of All That Happens: Voices From the Village Court in Medieval England. (Studies and Texts, 124.) Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 1996. Pp. X, 253; Tables and 1 Map. $45. [REVIEW] Speculum 73 (2):570-571.
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  12.  49
    Anna Giustina (forthcoming). Conscious Unity From the Top Down: A Brentanian Approach. The Monist 100.
    The question of the unity of consciousness is often treated as the question of how different conscious experiences are related to each other in order to be unified. Many contemporary views on the unity of consciousness are based on this bottom-up approach. In this paper I explore an alternative, top-down approach, according to which (to a first approximation) a subject undergoes one single conscious experience at a time. From this perspective, the problem of unity of consciousness becomes rather the problem (...)
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  13. Jessica M. Wilson (2014). No Work for a Theory of Grounding. Inquiry 57 (5-6):535–579.
    It has recently been suggested that a distinctive metaphysical relation---"Grounding"---is ultimately at issue in contexts where some goings-on are said to hold "in virtue of"", be (constitutively) "metaphysically dependent on", or be "nothing over and above" some others (see Fine 2001, Schaffer 2009, and Rosen 2010). Grounding is supposed to do good work (better than merely modal notions, in particular) in illuminating metaphysical dependence. I argue that Grounding is also unsuited to do this work. To start, Grounding alone cannot (...)
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  14. Andy Clark (2009). Spreading the Joy? Why the Machinery of Consciousness is (Probably) Still in the Head. Mind 118 (472):963-993.
    Is consciousness all in the head, or might the minimal physical substrate for some forms of conscious experience include the goings on in the (rest of the) body and the world? Such a view might be dubbed (by analogy with Clark and Chalmers’s ( 1998 ) claims concerning ‘the extended mind’) ‘the extended conscious mind’. In this article, I review a variety of arguments for the extended conscious mind, and find them flawed. Arguments for extended cognition, I conclude, do (...)
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  15. Alex Byrne (1997). Some Like It HOT: Consciousness and Higher-Order Thoughts. Philosophical Studies 2 (2):103-29.
    Consciousness is the subject of many metaphors, and one of the most hardy perennials compares consciousness to a spotlight, illuminating certain mental goings-on, while leaving others to do their work in the dark. One way of elaborating the spotlight metaphor is this: mental events are loaded on to one end of a conveyer belt by the senses, and move with the belt.
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  16. Jessica M. Wilson (2009). Determination, Realization and Mental Causation. Philosophical Studies 145 (1):149 - 169.
    How can mental properties bring about physical effects, as they seem to do, given that the physical realizers of the mental goings-on are already sufficient to cause these effects? This question gives rise to the problem of mental causation (MC) and its associated threats of causal overdetermination, mental causal exclusion, and mental causal irrelevance. Some (e.g., Cynthia and Graham Macdonald, and Stephen Yablo) have suggested that understanding mental-physical realization in terms of the determinable/determinate relation (henceforth, 'determination') provides the key (...)
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  17.  81
    P. Kyle Stanford (2009). Scientific Realism, the Atomic Theory, and the Catch-All Hypothesis: Can We Test Fundamental Theories Against All Serious Alternatives? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (2):253-269.
    Sherri Roush ([2005]) and I ([2001], [2006]) have each argued independently that the most significant challenge to scientific realism arises from our inability to consider the full range of serious alternatives to a given hypothesis we seek to test, but we diverge significantly concerning the range of cases in which this problem becomes acute. Here I argue against Roush's further suggestion that the atomic hypothesis represents a case in which scientific ingenuity has enabled us to overcome the problem, showing (...)
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  18.  72
    Johanna Seibt (2009). Forms of Emergent Interaction in General Process Theory. Synthese 166 (3):479 - 512.
    General Process Theory (GPT) is a new (non-Whiteheadian) process ontology. According to GPT the domains of scientific inquiry and everyday practice consist of configurations of ‘goings-on’ or ‘dynamics’ that can be technically defined as concrete, dynamic, non-particular individuals called general processes. The paper offers a brief introduction to GPT in order to provide ontological foundations for research programs such as interactivism that centrally rely on the notions of ‘process,’ ‘interaction,’ and ‘emergence.’ I begin with an analysis of our common (...)
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  19.  25
    William Arthur Wines (2008). Seven Pillars of Business Ethics: Toward a Comprehensive Framework. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 79 (4):483 - 499.
    This article first addresses the question of “why” we teach business ethics. Our answer to “why” provides both a response to those who oppose business ethics courses and a direction for course content. We believe a solid, comprehensive course in business ethics should address not only moral philosophy, ethical dilemmas, and corporate social responsibility – the traditional pillars of the disciple – but also additional areas necessary to make sense of the goings-on in the business world and in the (...)
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  20.  61
    Andy Clark (2010). Coupling, Constitution and the Cognitive Kind: A Reply to Adams and Aizawa. In Richard Menary (ed.), The Extended Mind. MIT Press 81-99.
    Adams and Aizawa, in a series of recent and forthcoming papers,, ) seek to refute, or perhaps merely to terminally embarrass, the friends of the extended mind. One such paper begins with the following illustration: "Question: Why did the pencil think that 2+2=4? Clark's Answer: Because it was coupled to the mathematician" Adams and Aizawa ms p.1 "That" the authors continue "about sums up what is wrong with Clark's extended mind hypothesis". The example of the pencil, they suggest, (...)
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  21. Sherri Irvin (2005). Appropriation and Authorship in Contemporary Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (2):123-137.
    Appropriation art has often been thought to support the view that authorship in art is an outmoded or misguided notion. Through a thought experiment comparing appropriation art to a unique case of artistic forgery, I examine and reject a number of candidates for the distinction that makes artists the authors of their work while forgers are not. The crucial difference is seen to lie in the fact that artists bear ultimate responsibility for whatever objectives they choose to pursue through their (...)
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  22. Anne Bezuidenhout (2005). Indexicals and Perspectivals. Facta Philosophica 7 (1):3-18.
    (1) Jenny is coming to visit me tonight. (2) I’m going to visit Jenny tonight. In these examples, it is where I am (my home, let us suppose) that is the center of the coming and going. This may suggest that the perspective point is always the perspective of the speaker, and that comings are always towards the speaker and that goings are away from the location of the speaker. But this isn’t necessarily so. For example, suppose that a (...)
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  23.  57
    Sherri C. Widen & James A. Russell (2010). Descriptive and Prescriptive Definitions of Emotion. Emotion Review 2 (4):377-378.
    Izard (2010) did not seek a descriptive definition of emotion—one that describes the concept as it is used by ordinary folk. Instead, he surveyed scientists’ prescriptive definitions—ones that prescribe how the concept should be used in theories of emotion. That survey showed a lack of agreement today and thus raised doubts about emotion as a useful scientific concept.
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  24. Mary Midgley (2003). Heart and Mind: The Varieties of Moral Experience. Routledge.
    With a new introduction by the author. It is a book of superb spirit and style, more entertaining than a work of philosophy has any right to be.’ – Times Literary Supplement. Throughout our lives we are making moral choices. Some decisions simply direct our everyday comings and goings; others affect our individual destinies. How do we make those choices? Where does our sense of right and wrong come from, and how can we make more informed decisions? In clear, (...)
     
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  25. Daniel C. Dennett (1995). Do Animals Have Beliefs? In H. Roitblat & Jean-Arcady Meyer (eds.), Comparative Approaches to Cognitive Science. MIT Press
    In Herbert Roitblat, ed., _Comparative Approaches to Cognitive Sciences_ , MIT Press, 1995. Daniel C. Dennett <blockquote> Do Animals Have Beliefs? </blockquote> According to one more or less standard mythology, behaviorism, the ideology and methodology that reigned in experimental psychology for most of the century, has been overthrown by a new ideology and methodology: cognitivism. Behaviorists, one is told, didn't take the mind seriously. They ignored--or even denied the existence of--mental states such as beliefs and desires, and mental processes such (...)
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  26.  53
    Achille C. Varzi (1997). Inconsistency Without Contradiction. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 38 (4):621-639.
    David Lewis has argued that impossible worlds are nonsense: if there were such worlds, one would have to distinguish between the truths about their contradictory goings-on and contradictory falsehoods about them; and this--Lewis argues--is preposterous. In this paper I examine a way of resisting this argument by giving up the assumption that ‘in so-and-so world’ is a restricting modifier which passes through the truth-functional connectives The outcome is a sort of subvaluational semantics which makes a contradiction ‘A & ~A’ (...)
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  27. John F. Halpin (1999). Nomic Necessity and Empiricism. Noûs 33 (4):630-643.
    character. So, we have learned from early on that laws are meant to portray a sort of necessity in nature. The comings and goings described by law are not merely contingently related. Rather, it is part of the concept of law that these events are connected in some significant way: "nomically" connected. One important desideratum for an account of law, then, is that it respect and perhaps explain this modal character.
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  28.  9
    David Davies (2015). Sibley and the Limits of Everyday Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetic Education 49 (3):50-65.
    In “The Pervasiveness of the Aesthetic in Ordinary Experience,” Sherri Irvin claims that “our everyday lives have an aesthetic character that is thoroughgoing and available at every moment, should we choose to attend to it.”1 While distancing her paper from terminological debates about the scope of the term “aesthetic,” she nonetheless claims to have established, at least to the satisfaction of a sympathetic “Deweyan” skeptic, that this term is properly applicable to the character of a range of everyday experiences. (...)
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  29.  83
    Christopher Dowling (2010). The Aesthetics of Daily Life. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (3):225-242.
    I explore and reflect on recent attempts to address the general neglect in contemporary aesthetics of the aesthetic character of everyday experiences. Contrasting approaches from Sherri Irvin and Yuriko Saito, I introduce a familiar Kantian distinction in order to express a prominent concern, and motivate what I take to be the most defensible approach to this relatively new area of discussion. CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this?
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  30.  78
    Andy Clark (2010). Coupling, Constitution and the Cognitive Kind. In Richard Menary (ed.), The Extended Mind. MIT Press
    Adams and Aizawa, in a series of recent and forthcoming papers ((2001), (In Press), (This Volume)) seek to refute, or perhaps merely to terminally embarrass, the friends of the extended mind. One such paper begins with the following illustration: "Question: Why did the pencil think that 2+2=4? Clark's Answer: Because it was coupled to the mathematician" Adams and Aizawa (this volume) ms p.1 "That" the authors continue "about sums up what is wrong with Clark's extended mind hypothesis". The (...)
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  31.  60
    Sherri Irvin (2006). Authors, Intentions and Literary Meaning. Philosophy Compass 1 (2):114–128.
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  32.  95
    Sherri Irvin (2008). The Pervasiveness of the Aesthetic in Ordinary Experience. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (1):29-44.
    I argue that the experiences of everyday life are replete with aesthetic character, though this fact has been largely neglected within contemporary aesthetics. As against Dewey's account of aesthetic experience, I suggest that the fact that many everyday experiences are simple, lacking in unity or closure, and characterized by limited or fragmented awareness does not disqualify them from aesthetic consideration. Aesthetic attention to the domain of everyday experience may provide for lives of greater satisfaction and contribute to our ability to (...)
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  33.  44
    Sherri Irvin (2007). Forgery and the Corruption of Aesthetic Understanding. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (2):283-304.
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  34.  6
    Terence Cuneo (2015). Love and Liturgy. Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (4):587-605.
    For two millennia Christians have assembled on the “day of the sun” to celebrate the liturgy together. But why do it? Why structure one's life in such a way that participation in ritualized religious activity is a fixed point in the weekly rhythm of one's comings and goings? The project of this essay is to identify reasons to engage in such activity that emanate from the Christian ethical vision. Fundamental to this vision is a contrast between an ethic of (...)
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  35. Barry C. Smith (2006). Consciousness: An Inner View of the Outer World. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (7-8):175-86.
    Right now my conscious experience is directed at part of the world. It takes in some aspects of things around me and not others. Some bits of the world occupy my attention, other worldly goings on condition or colour the character of my current perceptual experience. I experience buildings in view through the window, the clothes in the corner of the room, the colour of the walls, the plate with breads, the coffee mugs, the smell of fresh laundry, the (...)
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  36.  17
    Sherri A. Sharp (forthcoming). Personal Consultation Statement. Philosophy.
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  37.  33
    Sherri Irvin (2008). Scratching an Itch. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (1):25–35.
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  38.  34
    Sherri Irvin (2005). The Artist's Sanction in Contemporary Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (4):315–326.
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  39.  74
    Brian Weatherson, Tracking, Closure and Conjunctions.
    Comments on Sherri Rousch’s Tracking Truth for the 2006 Philosophy of Science Association conference.
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  40.  15
    Darren Oldridge (2005). Strange Histories: The Trial of the Pig, the Walking Dead, and Other Matters of Fact From the Medieval and Renaissance Worlds. Routledge.
    Did you know that insects could be tried for criminal acts in pre-industrial Europe, that the dead could be executed, that statues could be subjected to public humiliation, or that it was widely accepted that corpses could return to life? What made reasonable, educated men and women behave in ways that seem utterly nonsensical to us today? Strange Histories presents for the first time a serious account of some of the most extraordinary occurrences of European history. Throughout the ages, people (...)
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  41.  12
    Sherri A. Groveman (1998). The Hanukkah Bush: Ethical Implications in the Clinical Management of Intersex. Journal of Clinical Ethics 9 (4):356.
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  42.  3
    Sherri L. Jackson & Richard A. Griggs (1988). Education and the Selection Task. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 26 (4):327-330.
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  43.  46
    A. Lugg (2011). Blind Obedience: Paradox and Learning in the Later Wittgenstein * by Meredith Williams. Analysis 71 (2):389-391.
    Meredith Williams is unimpressed by ‘constructive/theoretical’ and ‘resolute/therapeutic’ approaches to the Philosophical Investigations . She takes Wittgenstein’s repudiation of speculation in philosophy seriously but resists interpreting him as engaged in a purely critical endeavour. There is, she holds, ‘a complex interweaving of the diagnostic and positive’ and ‘[a] consequence of the critical diagnostic work is a positive picture’ . Taking the Investigations to be ‘a highly structured argumentative text directed to pursuing a fundamental new problem in philosophy’ , Williams interprets (...)
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  44.  17
    John Sutton (2000). Symposium: Descartes on Perceptual Cognition. In S. Gaukroger, J. Schuster & J. Sutton (eds.), Descartes' Natural Philosophy. Routledge 524-527.
    Descartes, the textbooks say, divided human beings, or at least their minds, from the natural world. This is not just the consequence of metaphysical dualism, but of the concomitant indirect ‘ideas’ theory of perception. On the standard view, the soul must dimly infer the nature of the external world from the meagre, fragmentary, and often misleading input which is causally transmitted from objects through the nervous system to the brain and, ultimately, to the pineal gland. The metaphysical solipsism of the (...)
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  45.  60
    Sherri Irvin (2009). Teaching and Learning Guide For: Authors, Intentions and Literary Meaning. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):287-291.
    The relationship of the author's intention to the meaning of a literary work has been a persistently controversial topic in aesthetics. Anti-intentionalists Wimsatt and Beardsley, in the 1946 paper that launched the debate, accused critics who fueled their interpretative activity by poring over the author's private diaries and life story of committing the 'fallacy' of equating the work's meaning, properly determined by context and linguistic convention, with the meaning intended by the author. Hirsch responded that context and convention are not (...)
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  46.  4
    Sherri L. Condon (1986). The Discourse Functions of OK. Semiotica 60 (1-2):73-102.
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  47.  35
    Sherri Irvin (2009). Aesthetics and the Private Realm. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (2):226-230.
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  48.  5
    Natalya F. Noy, Sherri de Coronado, Harold Solbrig, Gilberto Fragoso, Frank W. Hartel & Mark A. Musen (2008). Representing the NCI Thesaurus in OWL DL: Modeling Tools Help Modeling Languages. Applied Ontology 3 (3):173-190.
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  49.  32
    Sherri Irvin (2004). Capacities, Context and the Moral Status of Animals. Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (1):61–76.
    According to a widely shared intuition, normal adult humans require greater moral concern than normal, adult animals in at least some circumstances. Even the most steadfast defenders of animals' moral status attempt to accommodate this intuition, often by holding that humans' higher-level capacities (intellect, linguistic ability, and so on) give rise to a greater number of interests, and thus the likelihood of greater satisfaction, thereby making their lives more valuable. However, the moves from capacities to interests, and from interests to (...)
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  50.  30
    Sherri Irvin (2006). The Aesthetics of Everyday Life Edited by Light, Andrew and Jonathan M. Smith. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (4):489–491.
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