Search results for 'Sherri Goings' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sherri Goings, Kin-Selection: The Rise and Fall of Kin-Cheaters.score: 240.0
    We demonstrate the existence of altruism via kin selection in artificial life and explore its nuances. We do so in the Avida system through a setup that is based on the behavior of colicinogenic bacteria: Organisms can kill unrelated organisms in a given radius but must kill themselves to do so. Initially, we confirm!results found in the bacterial world: Digital organisms do sacrifice themselves for their kin—an extreme example of altruism— and do so more often in structured environments, where kin (...)
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  2. Richard A. Griggs Richard, D. Platt Stephen, E. Newstead Sherri & L. Jackson (1998). Attentional Factors in a Disjunctive Reasoning Task. Thinking and Reasoning 4 (1):1 – 14.score: 20.0
    Girotto and Legrenzi's 1993 facilitation effect for their SARS version of Wason s THOG problem a disjunctive reasoning task was examined. The effect was not replicated when the standard THOG problem instructions were used in Experiments 1 and 2. However, in Experiment 3 when Girotto and Legrenzi's precise instructions were used, facilitation was observed. Experiment 4 further investigated the role of the type of instructions in the observed facilitation. The results suggest that such facilitation may result from attentional factors rather (...)
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  3. Brian Soucek (2009). Resisting the Itch to Redefine Aesthetics: A Response to Sherri Irvin. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (2):223-226.score: 15.0
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  4. J. R. Richards (1996). Nephrarious Goings On: Kidney Sales and Moral Arguments. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 21 (4):375-416.score: 15.0
    From all points of the political compass, from widely different groups, have come indignant outcries against the trade in human organs from live vendors. Opponents contend that such practices constitute a morally outrageous and gross exploitation of the poor, inherently coercive and obviously intolerable in any civilized society. This article examines the arguments typically offered in defense of these claims, and finds serious problems with all of them. The prohibition of organ sales is derived not from the principles and argument (...)
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  5. Julian Baggini (2007). Strange Goings on Down at the Farm. The Philosophers' Magazine 38:18-20.score: 15.0
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  6. Linda Marie Walker (2006). Of Restless Goings-on, and Actual Dyings. Angelaki 11 (1):117 – 126.score: 15.0
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  7. Murray Micah (2008). Multisensory Comings, Goings, and Switches. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 15.0
  8. Eileen M. Mielenhausen (1991). Comings and Goings: Metaphors and Linear and Cyclical Movement in Leguin's Always Coming Home. Utopian Studies 3:99-105.score: 15.0
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  9. Michel Paty (2003). Science and the Comings and Goings of Common Sense. Scientiae Studia 1 (1):9-26.score: 15.0
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  10. Reflections on Ian Hacking & Victoria Mcgeer (2010). The Clinical View Versus the Narrative View Individuals with Autism Are Very Much in the Public Eye. These Days, Anyone Versed in the Comings and Goings of Everyday Culture Will Have Heard of Autism (and/or Asperger Syndrome) 1—and Doubtless Knows Something About It. Misconceptions Also Abound. But Given That Autism. [REVIEW] In Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.), Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 15.0
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  11. I. L. Hruska (2004). Goings-on in Czech Ontology: Controversies About Myths or Reality? Filosoficky Casopis 52 (1):123-127.score: 15.0
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  12. Richard Wunderli (1998). Sherri Olson, A Chronicle of All That Happens: Voices From the Village Court in Medieval England. (Studies and Texts, 124.) Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 1996. Pp. X, 253; Tables and 1 Map. $45. [REVIEW] Speculum 73 (2):570-571.score: 15.0
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  13. Leslie R. Sims (2001). “Sherry's Secret”. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (1):147-150.score: 12.0
    The case and commentaries below were developed as part of a project, Graduate Research Ethics Education, undertaken by the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF Grant No. SBR 9421897 and NSF Grant No. 9817880). The project aims at training graduate students in research ethics and building a community of scientists and engineers who are interested in and capable of teaching research ethics. As part of the project, each graduate student participant develops a (...)
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  14. P. Kyle Stanford (2009). Scientific Realism, the Atomic Theory, and the Catch-All Hypothesis: Can We Test Fundamental Theories Against All Serious Alternatives? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (2):253-269.score: 10.0
    Sherri Roush ([2005]) and I ([2001], [2006]) have each argued independently that the most significant challenge to scientific realism arises from our inability to consider the full range of serious alternatives to a given hypothesis we seek to test, but we diverge significantly concerning the range of cases in which this problem becomes acute. Here I argue against Roush's further suggestion that the atomic hypothesis represents a case in which scientific ingenuity has enabled us to overcome the problem, showing (...)
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  15. David B. Citron & Richard J. Taffler (2001). Ethical Behaviour in the U.K. Audit Profession: The Case of the Self-Fulfilling Prophecy Under Going-Concern Uncertainties. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 29 (4):353 - 363.score: 8.0
    External auditors owe a professional duty to the company''s stockholders and to society in general. However their remuneration is determined by management. The resulting conflicts of interest are particularly acute in distressed companies where the auditors are required to disclose uncertainties regarding future survival. We focus on the consequentialist self-fulfilling prophecy argument whereby auditors may fail to disclose such uncertainties due to the belief that the disclosure itself would precipitate the company''s bankruptcy. We find no empirical support for such beliefs (...)
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  16. Federico Laudisa (2014). Against the 'No-Go' Philosophy of Quantum Mechanics. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 4 (1):1-17.score: 8.0
    In the area of the foundations of quantum mechanics a true industry appears to have developed in the last decades, with the aim of proving as many results as possible concerning what there cannot be in the quantum realm. In principle, the significance of proving ‘no-go’ results should consist in clarifying the fundamental structure of the theory, by pointing out a class of basic constraints that the theory itself is supposed to satisfy. In the present paper I will discuss some (...)
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  17. Daniel A. Farber (1997). Beyond All Reason: The Radical Assault on Truth in American Law. Oxford University Press.score: 8.0
    Would you want to be operated on by a surgeon trained at a medical school that did not evaluate its students? Would you want to fly in a plane designed by people convinced that the laws of physics are socially constructed? Would you want to be tried by a legal system indifferent to the distinction between fact and fiction? These questions may seem absurd, but there are theories being seriously advanced by radical multiculturalists that force us to ask such questions. (...)
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  18. Rajeev Goré & Revantha Ramanayake (2014). Cut-Elimination for Weak Grzegorczyk Logic Go. Studia Logica 102 (1):1-27.score: 8.0
    We present a syntactic proof of cut-elimination for weak Grzegorczyk logic Go. The logic has a syntactically similar axiomatisation to Gödel–Löb logic GL (provability logic) and Grzegorczyk’s logic Grz. Semantically, GL can be viewed as the irreflexive counterpart of Go, and Grz can be viewed as the reflexive counterpart of Go. Although proofs of syntactic cut-elimination for GL and Grz have appeared in the literature, this is the first proof of syntactic cut-elimination for Go. The proof is technically interesting, requiring (...)
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  19. Cornelia Herbert & Stefan Sütterlin (2012). Do Not Respond! Doing the Think/No-Think and Go/No-Go Tasks Concurrently Leads to Memory Impairment of Unpleasant Items During Later Recall. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 8.0
    Previous research using neuroimaging methods proposed a link between mechanisms controlling motor response inhibition and suppression of unwanted memories. The present study investigated this hypothesis behaviorally by combining the think-no-think paradigm (TNT) with a go/no-go motor inhibition task. Participants first learned unpleasant cue-target pairs. Cue words were then presented as go or no-go items in the TNT. Participants’ task was to respond to the cues and think of the target word aloud or to inhibit their response to the cue and (...)
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  20. Hillel Pratt Goded Shahaf (2013). Thorough Specification of the Neurophysiologic Processes Underlying Behavior and of Their Manifestation in EEG – Demonstration with the Go/No-Go Task. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 8.0
    In this work we demonstrate the principles of a systematic modeling approach of the neurophysiologic processes underlying a behavioral function. The modeling is based upon a flexible simulation tool, which enables parametric specification of the underlying neurophysiologic characteristics. While the impact of selecting specific parameters is of interest, in this work we focus on the insights, which emerge from rather accepted assumptions regarding neuronal representation. We show that harnessing of even such simple assumptions enables the derivation of significant insights regarding (...)
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  21. Richard Peterson (2010). When Scientists Go to War. In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell. 420--428.score: 7.0
    This chapter contains sections titled: * 1 Science and Scientists in Conflict – the Case of Bohr and Heisenberg * 2 Professional/Personal Ethics in a Time Of War – Meitner, Einstein, Compton, and Wilson * 3 An Existential Experience: The Epiphany of the First Atomic Bomb Test * References.
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  22. James Ladyman (2007). Every Thing Must Go: Metaphysics Naturalized. Oxford University Press.score: 6.0
    Every Thing Must Go aruges that the only kind of metaphysics that can contribute to objective knowledge is one based specifically on contemporary science as it ...
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  23. Basileios Kroustallis (2012). Film as Thought Experiment: A Happy-Go-Lucky Case? Film-Philosophy 16 (1):72-84.score: 6.0
    Can some films be genuine thought experiments that challenge our commonsense intuitions? Certain filmic narratives and their mise-en-scène details reveal rigorous reasoning and counterintuitive outcomes on philosophical issues, such as skepticism or personal identity. But this philosophical façade may hide a mundane concern for entertainment. Unfamiliar narratives drive spectator entertainment, and every novel cinematic situation could be easily explained as part of a process that lacks motives of philosophical elucidation. -/- The paper inverses the above objection, and proposes that when (...)
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  24. John Byron Manchak (2011). No No-Go: A Remark on Time Machines. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 42 (1):74-76.score: 6.0
    We present a counterexample to Krasnikov's (2002) much discussed time machine no-go result. In addition, we prove a positive statement: a time machine existence theorem under a modest "no holes" assumption.
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  25. John Earman (1967). On Going Backward in Time. Philosophy of Science 34 (3):211-222.score: 6.0
    This paper presents a critical examination of claims advanced by several philosophers to the effect that 'time travel' represents a physical possibility and that the interpretation of certain actually observed phenomena in terms of 'time travel' is both legitimate and advantageous. It is argued that (a) no convincing motivation for the introduction of the time travel hypothesis has been presented; (b) no coherent and interesting sense of 'going backward in time' has been supplied which makes 'time travel' compatible with Special (...)
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  26. James Garvey (2011). Climate Change and Causal Inefficacy: Why Go Green When It Makes No Difference? Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 69:157-174.score: 6.0
    Reflection on personal choices and climate change can lead to the thought that nothing an individual does can possibly make a difference to the planet’s future. So why bother going green? This is a version of the problem of causal inefficacy, and it is a particular problem for those with consequentialist leanings. Voters and vegetarians are consulted for help, and a suggestive thought about consistency is pursued. Consequentialist arguments for governmental action are shored up with reflection on consistency, and, hopefully, (...)
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  27. Danko Georgiev (2013). Quantum No-Go Theorems and Consciousness. Axiomathes 23 (4):683-695.score: 6.0
    Our conscious minds exist in the Universe, therefore they should be identified with physical states that are subject to physical laws. In classical theories of mind, the mental states are identified with brain states that satisfy the deterministic laws of classical mechanics. This approach, however, leads to insurmountable paradoxes such as epiphenomenal minds and illusionary free will. Alternatively, one may identify mental states with quantum states realized within the brain and try to resolve the above paradoxes using the standard Hilbert (...)
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  28. Aleksandar Jokic (2013). Go Local: Morality and International Activism. Ethics and Global Politics 6 (1):1-24.score: 6.0
    A step towards constructing an ethics of international activism is proposed by formulating a series of constraints on what would constitute morally permissible agency in the context that involves delivering services abroad, directly or indirectly. Perhaps surprisingly, in this effort the author makes use of the concept of ‘force multiplier’. This idea and its official applications have explanatory importance in considering the correlation between the post-Cold War phenomenal growth in the number of international non-governmental organizations and the emergence of the (...)
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  29. J. Saul (2012). Just Go Ahead and Lie. Analysis 72 (1):3-9.score: 6.0
    The view that lying is morally worse than merely misleading is a very natural one, which has had many prominent defenders. Nonetheless, here I will argue that it is misguided: holding all else fixed, acts of mere misleading are not morally preferable to acts of lying, and successful lying is not morally worse than merely deliberately misleading. In fact, except in certain very special contexts, I will suggest that – when faced with a felt need to deceive – we might (...)
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  30. David Mackie (1998). Going Topless. Ratio 11 (2):125-140.score: 6.0
    The view that people go where their brains go remains popular in discussions of personal identity. But since the brain is only a small part of the body, defenders of that view need to provide an account of what it is that makes the brain specially relevant to personal identity. The standard answer is that the brain is special because it is the carrier of psychological continuity. But Peter van Inwagen has recently offered (in Material Beings) an alternative account of (...)
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  31. John Shotter (1996). 'Now I Can Go On:' Wittgenstein and Our Embodied Embeddedness in the 'Hurly-Burly' of Life. [REVIEW] Human Studies 19 (4):385 - 407.score: 6.0
    Wittgenstein is not primarily concerned with anything mysterious going on inside people's heads, but with us simply going on with each other; that is, with us being able to inter-relate our everyday, bodily activities in unproblematic ways in with those of others, in practice. Learning to communicate with clear and unequivocal meanings; to send messages; to fully understand each other; to be able to reach out, so to speak, from within language-game entwined forms of life, and to talk in theoretical (...)
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  32. E. Sober & M. Steel (2013). Screening-Off and Causal Incompleteness: A No-Go Theorem. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (3):513-550.score: 6.0
    We begin by considering two principles, each having the form causal completeness ergo screening-off. The first concerns a common cause of two or more effects; the second describes an intermediate link in a causal chain. They are logically independent of each other, each is independent of Reichenbach's principle of the common cause, and each is a consequence of the causal Markov condition. Simple examples show that causal incompleteness means that screening-off may fail to obtain. We derive a stronger result: in (...)
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  33. Andrés Guiral-Contreras, Emiliano Ruiz-Barbadillo & Waymond Rodgers, To What Extend is the Going Concern Judgment Influenced by the Self-Fulfilling Prophecy?score: 6.0
    We examined whether auditors' attitude to the evidence may be driven by their perception of the self-fulfilling prophecy effect. Following previous research on motivated reasoning, we assumed that the self-fulfilling prophecy effect could be interpreted as a potential motivational/incentive factor supporting auditor's reluctance to release going concern opinions. We contribute to the literature by demonstrating in a laboratory experiment that auditors' perceptions of the self-fulfilling prophecy effect can bias their professional judgment. To this extend, the Hogarth and Einhorn's belief-adjustment model (...)
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  34. Shimon Edelman & Elise M. Breen (1999). On the Virtues of Going All the Way. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):614-614.score: 6.0
    Representational systems need to use symbols as internal stand-ins for distal quantities and events. Barsalou's ideas go a long way towards making the symbol system theory of representation more appealing, by delegating one critical part of the representational burden to image-like entities. The target article, however, leaves the other critical component of any symbol system theory underspecified. We point out that the binding problem can be alleviated if a perceptual symbol system is made to rely on image-like entities not only (...)
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  35. James Lindemann Nelson (2010). How Catherine Does Go On: Northanger Abbey and Moral Thought. Philosophy and Literature 34 (1):pp. 188-200.score: 6.0
    A certain pupil with the vaguely Kafkaesque name B has mastered the series of natural numbers. B's new task is to learn how to write down other series of cardinal numbers and right now, we're working on the series "+2." After a bit, B seems to catch on, but we are unusually thorough teachers and keep him at it. Things are going just fine until he reaches 1000. Then, quite confounding us, he writes 1004, 1008, 1012."We say to him: 'Look (...)
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  36. Itamar Pitowsky, New Bell Inequalities for the Singlet State: Going Beyond the Grothendieck Bound.score: 6.0
    Contemporary versions of Bell’s argument against local hidden variable (LHV) theories are based on the Clauser Horne Shimony and Holt (CHSH) inequality, and various attempts to generalize it. The amount of violation of these inequalities cannot exceed the bound set by the Grothendieck constants. However, if we go back to the original derivation by Bell, and use the perfect anticorrelation embodied in the singlet spin state, we can go beyond these bounds. In this paper we derive two-particle Bell inequalities for (...)
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  37. Louis Vervoort, No-Go Theorems Face Fluid-Dynamical Theories for Quantum Mechanics.score: 6.0
    Recent experiments on fluid-dynamical systems have revealed a series of striking quantum-like features of these macroscopic systems, thus reviving the quest to describe quantum mechanics by classical, in particular fluid-dynamical, theories. However, it is generally admitted that such an endeavor is impossible, on the basis of the 'no-go' theorems of Bell and Kochen-Specker. Here we show that such theorems are inoperative for fluid-dynamical models, even if these are local. Such models appear to violate one of the premises of both theorems, (...)
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  38. Bart Schultz (2014). Go Tell It on the Mountain. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (2):233-251.score: 6.0
    Derek Parfit’s long-awaited work On What Matters is a very ambitious, very strange production seeking to defend both a nonreductive and nonnaturalistic but nonmetaphysical and nonontological form of cognitive intuitionism or rationalism and an ethical theory (the Triple Theory) reflecting the convergence of Kantian universalizability, Scanlonian contractualism, and rule utilitarianism. Critics have already countered that Parfit’s metaethics is unbelievable and his convergence thesis unconvincing, but On What Matters is a truly Sidgwickian work, the implications of which largely remain to be (...)
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  39. Patrick Grim & Nicholas Rescher (2013). How Modeling Can Go Wrong. Philosophy and Technology 26 (1):75-80.score: 6.0
    Modeling and simulation clearly have an upside. My discussion here will deal with the inevitable downside of modeling — the sort of things that can go wrong. It will set out a taxonomy for the pathology of models — a catalogue of the various ways in which model contrivance can go awry. In the course of that discussion, I also call on some of my past experience with models and their vulnerabilities.
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  40. Hillevi Lenz-Taguchi (2010). Going Beyond the Theory/Practice Divide in Early Childhood Education: Introducing an Intra-Active Pedagogy. Routledge.score: 6.0
    Going beyond the theory/practice and discourse/matter divides -- Learning and becoming in an onto-epistemology -- The tool of pedagogical documentation -- An intra-active pedagogy and its dual movements -- Transgressing binary practices in early childhood teacher education -- The hybrid-writing-process: going beyond the theory/practice divide in academic writing -- An ethics of immanence and potentialities for early childhood education.
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  41. John D. Norton (2014). The End of the Thermodynamics of Computation: A No-Go Result. Philosophy of Science 80 (5):1182-1192.score: 6.0
    The thermodynamics of computation assumes that computational processes at the molecular level can be brought arbitrarily close to thermodynamic reversibility and that thermodynamic entropy creation is unavoidable only in data erasure or the merging of computational paths, in accord with Landauer’s principle. The no-go result shows that fluctuations preclude completion of thermodynamically reversible processes. Completion can be achieved only by irreversible processes that create thermodynamic entropy in excess of the Landauer limit.
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  42. Kai von Fintel, What to Do If You Want to Go to Harlem: Anankastic Conditionals and Related Matters.score: 6.0
    At first glance, this is an entirely unremarkable kind of sentence. It is easy to find naturally occuring exponents. Its meaning is also clear: taking the A train is a necessary condition for going to Harlem. Hence the term “anankastic conditional”, Ananke being the Greek protogonos of inevitability, compulsion and necessity.
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  43. Sarah Oates (2011). Going Native: The Value in Reconceptualizing International Internet Service Providers as Domestic Media Outlets. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Technology 24 (4):391-409.score: 6.0
    Going Native: The Value in Reconceptualizing International Internet Service Providers as Domestic Media Outlets Content Type Journal Article Category Special Issue Pages 391-409 DOI 10.1007/s13347-011-0045-4 Authors Sarah Oates, School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Glasgow, Adam Smith Building, G12 8RT Scotland, UK Journal Philosophy & Technology Online ISSN 2210-5441 Print ISSN 2210-5433 Journal Volume Volume 24 Journal Issue Volume 24, Number 4.
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  44. Ben Kotzee & Christopher Martin (2013). Who Should Go to University? Justice in University Admissions. Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (4):623-641.score: 6.0
    Current debates regarding justice in university admissions most often approach the question of access to university from a technical, policy-focussed perspective. Despite the attention that access to university receives in the press and policy literature, ethical discussion tends to focus on technical matters such as who should pay for university or which schemes of selection are allowable, not the question of who should go to university in the first place. We address the question of university admissions—the question of who should (...)
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  45. Sharon Todd (2011). Going to the Heart of the Matter. Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (5):507-512.score: 6.0
    Written as a conversational response to Rosa Luxemburg, this piece discusses the importance of going to the heart of the matter for education, seen here in terms of the actual flesh and blood subjects who are at the centre of a pedagogy of transformation.
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  46. Simon Parry (2012). Going Green: The Evolution of Micro-Business Environmental Practices. Business Ethics 21 (2):220-237.score: 6.0
    This paper examines the process through which micro-businesses ‘go green’. It builds upon previous studies that have identified the different drivers of this greening process. However, rather than a static focus on specific drivers, the study articulates the evolution of environmental practices over time. The paper uses comparative case studies of six micro-businesses to build a composite sequence analysis that plots the greening process from its roots through to large-scale and ambitious ecological projects. The study identifies three distinct stages that (...)
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  47. Bryan Reynolds & Adam Bryx (2012). Go Fractalactic! A Brief Guide Through Subjectivity in the Philosophy of Félix Guattari and Transversal Poetics. Deleuze Studies 6 (2):291-305.score: 6.0
    We adventure becomings-Merry Pranksters with Félix Guattari on Ken Kesey's magic bus to resonate the group's transversality that we already affect subjunctively, individually and plurally from which our subjectivities crystallise collectively and independently with intensive-extensions to go viscerallectric and fractalactic. Yet in-process, before our consciousnesses go motored, we swim with jet streams of both Guattari and transversal poetics to navigate subjective affects by which wilful parameterisations achieve desirable eventualisations.
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  48. Raymond Anthony (2012). The Ethics of Food for Tomorrow: On the Viability of Agrarianism—How Far Can It Go? Comments on Paul Thompson's Agrarian Vision. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (4):543-552.score: 6.0
    Abstract I consider Paul Thompson’s Agrarian Vision from the perspective of the philosophy of technology, especially as it relates to certain questions about public engagement and deliberative democracy around food issues. Is it able to promote an attitudinal shift or reorientation in values to overcome the view of “food as device” so that conscientious engagement in the food system by consumers can become more the norm? Next, I consider briefly, some questions to which it must face up in order to (...)
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  49. Jaron Lanier, Paul D. Miller & Hey Paul, Where Did the Music Go?score: 6.0
    IÂ’m only talking about commercial big time music in the United States. Of course music is gloriously seething in odd corners of the planet as it should. I can team up with some compatible friends and we can go find or make our own music in any of a number of accommodating environments- on the net, in the forest, or in some dank club late at night.
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  50. David B. Malament, A No-Go Theorem About Rotation in Relativity Theory.score: 6.0
    Within the framework of general relativity, in some cases at least, it is a delicate and interesting question just what it means to say that an extended body is or is not "rotating". It is so for two reasons. First, one can easily think of different criteria of rotation. Though they agree if the background spacetime structure is sufficiently simple, they do not do so in general. Second, none of the criteria fully answers to our classical intuitions. Each one exhibits (...)
     
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