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Profile: Sherri Irvin (University of Oklahoma)
  1. Sherri Irvin (2013). A Shared Ontology. In Christy Mag Uidhir (ed.), Art and Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press. 242.
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  2. Sherri Irvin (2012). Artwork and Document in the Photography of Louise Lawler. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (1):79-90.
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  3. Sherri Irvin (2009). Aesthetics and the Private Realm. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (2):226-230.
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  4. Sherri Irvin (2009). Introduction. Journal of Aesthetic Education 43 (3):pp. 1-3.
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  5. Sherri Irvin (2009). Teaching and Learning Guide For: Authors, Intentions and Literary Meaning. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):287-291.
    The relationship of the author's intention to the meaning of a literary work has been a persistently controversial topic in aesthetics. Anti-intentionalists Wimsatt and Beardsley, in the 1946 paper that launched the debate, accused critics who fueled their interpretative activity by poring over the author's private diaries and life story of committing the 'fallacy' of equating the work's meaning, properly determined by context and linguistic convention, with the meaning intended by the author. Hirsch responded that context and convention are not (...)
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  6. Sherri Irvin (2009). Theatrical Performances and the Works Performed. Journal of Aesthetic Education 43 (3):pp. 37-50.
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  7. Sherri Irvin (2008). Scratching an Itch. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (1):25–35.
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  8. Sherri Irvin (2008). The Pervasiveness of the Aesthetic in Ordinary Experience. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (1):29-44.
    I argue that the experiences of everyday life are replete with aesthetic character, though this fact has been largely neglected within contemporary aesthetics. As against Dewey's account of aesthetic experience, I suggest that the fact that many everyday experiences are simple, lacking in unity or closure, and characterized by limited or fragmented awareness does not disqualify them from aesthetic consideration. Aesthetic attention to the domain of everyday experience may provide for lives of greater satisfaction and contribute to our ability to (...)
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  9. Sherri Irvin (2007). Forgery and the Corruption of Aesthetic Understanding. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (2):283-304.
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  10. Sherri Irvin (2006). Authors, Intentions and Literary Meaning. Philosophy Compass 1 (2):114–128.
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  11. Sherri Irvin (2006). The Aesthetics of Everyday Life Edited by Light, Andrew and Jonathan M. Smith. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (4):489–491.
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  12. Sherri Irvin (2005). Appropriation and Authorship in Contemporary Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (2):123-137.
    Appropriation art has often been thought to support the view that authorship in art is an outmoded or misguided notion. Through a thought experiment comparing appropriation art to a unique case of artistic forgery, I examine and reject a number of candidates for the distinction that makes artists the authors of their work while forgers are not. The crucial difference is seen to lie in the fact that artists bear ultimate responsibility for whatever objectives they choose to pursue through their (...)
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  13. Sherri Irvin (2005). Interprétation et description d'une œuvre d'art. Philosophiques 32 (1):135-148.
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  14. Sherri Irvin (2005). The Artist's Sanction in Contemporary Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (4):315–326.
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  15. Sherri Irvin (2004). Artworks and Representational Properties. Dialogue 43 (4):627-644.
    A sustained challenge to the view that artworks are physical objects relates to the alleged inability of physical objects to possess representational properties, which some artworks clearly do possess. I argue that the challenge is subject to confusions about representational properties and aesthetic experience. I show that a challenge to artwork-object identity put forward by Danto is vulnerable to a similar criticism. I conclude by noting that the identity of artworks and physical objects is consistent with the insight that attending (...)
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  16. Sherri Irvin (2004). Capacities, Context and the Moral Status of Animals. Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (1):61–76.
    According to a widely shared intuition, normal adult humans require greater moral concern than normal, adult animals in at least some circumstances. Even the most steadfast defenders of animals' moral status attempt to accommodate this intuition, often by holding that humans' higher-level capacities (intellect, linguistic ability, and so on) give rise to a greater number of interests, and thus the likelihood of greater satisfaction, thereby making their lives more valuable. However, the moves from capacities to interests, and from interests to (...)
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