Search results for 'Sheryle Drewe Dixon' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sheryle Drewe Dixon (2001). Organized Sport. Professional Ethics 9 (3/4):27-47.score: 870.0
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  2. Sheryle Bergmann Drewe Dixon (2001). Socrates, Sport, and Students: A Philosophical Inquiry Into Physical Education and Sport. Upa.score: 810.0
    Socrates, Sports, and Students involves a philosophical justification for the inclusion of physical education in the school system. This book will appeal to physical educators and administrators interested in justifying their activity, as well as philosophers and professors in the areas of education and sport.
     
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  3. Sheryle Drewe (2001). The Value of Knowledge/Rationality or the Knowledge/Rationality of Value?: Implications for Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (3):235-244.score: 240.0
    This paper reviews and augments important work in philosophy of education on intrinsic aims for education, of knowledge, of knowledge of values, and of rationality. A contemporary conception of knowledge as ``rationality's `data-base''' is proposed and an in-depth section on the intrinsic value of rationality is incorporated.
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  4. Sheryle Bergmann Drewe (2001). Russell in Context. Inquiry 20 (2):45-47.score: 240.0
  5. Sheryle Bergmann Drewe (2000). The Making of High-Performance Athletes: Discipline, Diversity, and Ethics. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 27 (1):100-103.score: 240.0
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  6. Cheryl Armon, Sheryle Bergman Drewe, Judith Boss, George Dei, Patrick Dillon, David Gooderham, Han Gur Ze'ev, Ann Higgins D'Alessandro, Kay Johnston & Yong Lin Moon (1998). JME Referees in 1997. Journal of Moral Education 27 (2):263.score: 240.0
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  7. Sheryle Bergmann Drewe (2001). Socrates, Sport, and Students: A Philosophical Inquiry Into Physical Education and Sport. University Press of America.score: 240.0
  8. Gabriela Tymowski (2004). Why Sport's An Introduction to the Philosophy of Sport By Sheryle Bergmann Drewe (Thompson Educational Publishing, Inc., 2003: Toronto). Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 31 (1):100-102.score: 144.0
    (2004). Why Sport's An Introduction to the Philosophy of Sport By Sheryle Bergmann Drewe (Thompson Educational Publishing, Inc., 2003: Toronto) Journal of the Philosophy of Sport: Vol. 31, No. 1, pp. 100-102.
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  9. Keith Thompson (2002). Socrates, Sport and Students: A Philosophical Inquiry Into Physical Education and Sport By Sheryle Bergmann Drewe. Published 2001 by the University Press of America, Lanham, MD. ($49.00). [REVIEW] Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 29 (2):190-192.score: 120.0
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  10. Thomas Dixon (2003). From Passions to Emotions: The Creation of a Secular Psychological Category. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Today there is a thriving 'emotions industry' to which philosophers, psychologists and neuroscientists are contributing. Yet until two centuries ago 'the emotions' did not exist. In this path-breaking study Thomas Dixon shows how, during the nineteenth century, the emotions came into being as a distinct psychological category, replacing existing categories such as appetites, passions, sentiments and affections. By examining medieval and eighteenth-century theological psychologies and placing Charles Darwin and William James within a broader and more complex nineteenth-century setting, Thomas (...)
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  11. Robert Dixon & Reid (2013). The Contemporary Catholic Community: A View From the 2011 Census. The Australasian Catholic Record 90 (2):131.score: 60.0
    Dixon, Robert; Reid, Stephen Catholics are the largest religious group in Australia. According to the 2011 Australian Census, Catholics made up just over a quarter of the Australian population: there were 5,439,268 Catholics in a total Australian population of 21,507,719. In the five years between the 2006 and 2011 Censuses, the number of Catholics increased by over 312,000, or 6.1 per cent. During the same period, the total Australian population increased by 8.3 per cent. Catholics have continued to grow (...)
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  12. Robert Dixon (2013). What Do Mass Attenders Believe?: Contemporary Cultural Change and the Acceptance of Key Catholic Beliefs and Moral Teachings by Australian Mass Attenders. Australasian Catholic Record, The 90 (4):439.score: 60.0
    Dixon, Robert Have the cultural changes of the last fifty years or so influenced the way that Australia's most active Catholics think about key Catholic beliefs and moral teachings? In this article, I will search for evidence of such an influence by examining responses from Mass attenders to selected questions in the 2011 National Church Life Survey. I will note especially the extent to which respondents' demographic characteristics are related to the way they answered those questions, and I will (...)
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  13. Robert Dixon, Stephen Reid & Noel Connolly (2011). See I Am Doing a New Thing: The 2009 Survey of Catholic Religious Institutes in Australia. The Australasian Catholic Record 88 (3):271.score: 60.0
    Dixon, Robert; Reid, Stephen; Connolly, Noel Since the Australian Catholic Bishops Conference established a pastoral research capability in 1996, a great deal of research has been carried out on various aspects of the Catholic community in Australia. This research has been carried out either directly by the Bishops Conference's research staff, or in association with other bodies such as NCLS Research, the Christian Research Association, Australian Catholic University and, most recently, Catholic Religious Australia.
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  14. Thomas Dixon (2008). The Invention of Altruism: Making Moral Meanings in Victorian Britain. Published for the British Academy by Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    'Altruism' was coined by the French sociologist Auguste Comte in the early 1850s as a theoretical term in his 'cerebral theory' and as the central ideal of his atheistic 'Religion of Humanity'. In The Invention of Altruism, Thomas Dixon traces this new language of 'altruism' as it spread through British culture between the 1850s and the 1900s, and in doing so provides a new portrait of Victorian moral thought. Drawing attention to the importance of Comtean positivism in setting the (...)
     
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  15. Robert Dixon (2014). The Science of Listening: Context and Challenges Facing the Catholic Community in Australia. Australasian Catholic Record, The 91 (3):264.score: 60.0
    Dixon, Robert Genevieve Lacey is an extraordinary Australian musician, a recorder virtuoso and, incidentally, daughter of the late Dr Rod Lacey, a lecturer in history at Aquinas College, later the Aquinas Campus of ACU, in Ballarat. She has a substantial recording catalogue and a high-profile career as soloist with orchestras and ensembles around the world.
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  16. Ted M. Preston & Scott Dixon (2007). Who Wants to Live Forever? Immortality, Authenticity, and Living Forever in the Present. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 61 (2):99 - 117.score: 30.0
    Death is a bad thing by virtue of its ability to frustrate the subjectively valuable projects that shape our identities and render our lives meaningful. While the presumption that immortality would necessarily result in boredom worse than death proves unwarranted, if the constraint of mortality is a necessary element for virtues, relationships, and motivation to pursue our life-projects, then death might nevertheless be a necessary evil. Mortal or immortal, it’s clear that the value of one’s life depends on its subjectively (...)
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  17. Nicholas Dixon (2001). Boxing, Paternalism, and Legal Moralism. Social Theory and Practice 27 (2):323-344.score: 30.0
    324 "we should impose a single legal restriction that would effectively eliminate boxing's main medical risk: a complete ban on blows to the head" against Mill's harm principle, is not possible to justify paternalism requires other paternalistic arguments 325 "the entire paternalism v. respect for autonomy debate as it applied to boxing is cast in nonconsequentialist terms" do we have any reason to suppose that boxers' decisions to enter the profession are lacking in autonomy? many fail the first hurdle: "having (...)
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  18. Nicholas Dixon (2007). Trash Talking, Respect for Opponents and Good Competition. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (1):96 – 106.score: 30.0
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  19. Beth Dixon (2001). Animal Emotion. Ethics and the Environment 6 (2):22-30.score: 30.0
    : Recent work in the area of ethics and animals suggests that it is philosophically legitimate to ascribe emotions to nonhuman animals. Furthermore, it is sometimes argued that emotionality is a morally relevant psychological state shared by humans and nonhumans. What is missing from the philosophical literature that makes reference to emotions in nonhuman animals is an attempt to clarify and defend some particular account of the nature of emotion, and the role that emotions play in a characterization of human (...)
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  20. Nicholas Dixon (2008). Performance-Enhancing Drugs, Paternalism, Meritocracy, and Harm to Sport. Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (2):246–268.score: 30.0
  21. M. Dixon, Daniel Smilek, C. Cudahy & Philip M. Merikle (2000). Five Plus Two Equals Yellow: Mental Arithmetic in People with Synaesthesia is Not Coloured by Visual Experience. Nature 406.score: 30.0
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  22. Mark H. Dixon (2009). The Architecture of Solitude. Environment, Space, Place 1 (1):53-72.score: 30.0
    As a spiritual or meditative practice solitude implies more than mere silence or being alone. While these are perhaps indispensablecomponents, it is possible to be alone or to live in silence and nevertheless be unable to reconfigure these into genuine solitude. Solitude is also more than being in some remote or inaccessible place. Even though geographical isolation might be conducive to solitude, with rare exceptions human beings have seldom sought solitude in complete seclusion in the wilderness. The places where human (...)
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  23. John W. Dixon (forthcoming). Book Review: God and the Creative Imagination: Metaphor, Symbol and Myth in Religion and Theology. [REVIEW] Interpretation 56 (2):223-224.score: 30.0
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  24. Cam Caldwell & Rolf D. Dixon (2010). Love, Forgiveness, and Trust: Critical Values of the Modern Leader. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 93 (1):91 - 101.score: 30.0
    In a world that has become increasingly dependent upon employee ownership, commitment, and initiative, organizations need leaders who can inspire their␣employees and motivate them individually. Love, forgiveness, and trust are critical values of today’s organization leaders who are committed to maximizing value for organizations while helping organization members to become their best. We explain the importance of love, forgiveness, and trust in the modern organization and identify 10 commonalities of these virtues.
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  25. A. E. Taylor, Theodor Lorenz, John Burnet, Edward T. Dixon & L. T. (1901). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 10 (37):125-135.score: 30.0
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  26. Nicholas Dixon (1995). The Friendship Model of Filial Obligations. Journal of Applied Philosophy 12 (1):77-87.score: 30.0
    ABSTRACT This paper [1] is a defence of a modified version of Jane English's model of filial obligations based on adult children's friendship with their parents. Unlike the more traditional view that filial obligations are a repayment for parental sacrifices, the friendship model puts filial duties in the appealing context of voluntary, loving relationships. Contrary to English's original statement of this view, which is open to the charge of tolerating filial ingratitude, the friendship model can generate obligations to help our (...)
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  27. Youzheng Wu, Kazuhiko Abe, Paul Dixon, Chiori Hori & Hideki Kashioka (2012). Leveraging Social Annotation for Topic Language Model Adaptation. Corpus 1:2.score: 30.0
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  28. E. T. Dixon (1893). On the Distinction Between Real and Verbal Propositions. Mind 2 (7):339-346.score: 30.0
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  29. Nicholas Dixon (1999). Handguns, Violent Crime, and Self-Defense. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 13 (2):239-260.score: 30.0
    By far the most plausible explanation of data on violent crime in the United States is that its high handgun ownership rate is a major causal factor. The only realistic way to significantly reduce violent crime in this country is an outright ban on private ownership of handguns. While such a ban would undeniably restrict one particular freedom, it would violate no rights. In particular, the unquestioned right to self-defense does not entail a right to own handguns, because the evidence (...)
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  30. Nicholas Dixon (2009). Why Mainstream Conservatives Should Support Government-Mandated Universal Health Care. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (1):1-15.score: 30.0
    Menzel and Light have argued that the conservative principle of self-sufficiency gives good reasons to strive for universal health coverage. This paper gives further reasons for connecting universal health care with self-sufficiency and continues Menzel’s and Light’s project in four more ways. First, a more extended analysis of a conservative conception of government shows how a general opposition to welfare programs is consistent with guaranteeing universal basic health care. Second, common fears about the abuse of health care when universal access (...)
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  31. Cam Caldwell, Rolf D. Dixon, Larry A. Floyd, Joe Chaudoin, Jonathan Post & Gaynor Cheokas (2012). Transformative Leadership: Achieving Unparalleled Excellence. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 109 (2):175-187.score: 30.0
    The ongoing cynicism about leaders and organizations calls for a new standard of ethical leadership that we have labeled “transformative leadership.” This new leadership model integrates ethically-based features of six other well-regarded leadership perspectives and combines key normative and instrumental elements of each of those six perspectives. Transformative leadership honors the governance obligations of leaders by demonstrating a commitment to the welfare of all stakeholders and by seeking to optimize long-term wealth creation. Citing the scholarly literature about leadership theory, we (...)
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  32. Nicholas Dixon (2001). The Ethics of Supporting Sports Teams. Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (2):149–158.score: 30.0
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  33. Nicholas Dixon (2011). Handguns, Philosophers, and the Right to Self-Defense. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (2):151-170.score: 30.0
    Within the last decade or so several philosophers have argued against handgun prohibition on the ground that it violates the right to self-defense. However, even these philosophers grant that the right to own handguns is not absolute and could be overridden if doing so would bring about an enormous social good. Analysis of intra-United States empirical data cited by gun rights advocates indicates that guns do not make us safer, while international data lends powerful support to the thesis that guns (...)
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  34. Robert Dixon (1982). Reviews : G. Crough, T. Wheelwright and T. Wilshire, (Editors) Australia and World Capitalism, (Pengum, Ringwood 1980), P. Sheehan, Crisis in Abundance, Penguin, Ringwood 1980), B. Hughes. Exit Full Employment, Angus and Robertson, Sydney 1980). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 4 (1):200-204.score: 30.0
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  35. Ben Dixon (2005). Achieving Moral Progress Despite Moral Regress. Social Philosophy Today 21:157-172.score: 30.0
    Moral progress and some of the conditions under which groups can make it is the focus of this paper. More specifically, I address a problem arising from the use of pluralistic criteria for determining moral progress. Pluralistic criteria can allow for judgments that moral progress has taken place where there is causally related moral regression. Indeed, an otherwise well-argued pluralistic theory put forward by Michelle Moody-Adams allows for such conflicting judgments. I argue, however, that the way in which Moody-Adams handles (...)
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  36. Nicholas Dixon (2005). Modesty, Snobbery, and Pride. Journal of Value Inquiry 39 (3-4):415-429.score: 30.0
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  37. Nicholas Dixon (2007). Romantic Love, Appraisal, and Commitment. Philosophical Forum 38 (4):373–386.score: 30.0
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  38. David Wilson & William Dixon (2011). Das Adam Smith Problem - A Critical Realist Perspective. Journal of Critical Realism 5 (2):251-272.score: 30.0
    The old Das Adam Smith Problem is no longer tenable. Few today believe that Smith postulates two contradictory principles of human action: one in the Wealth of Nations and another in the Theory of Moral Sentiments . Nevertheless, an Adam Smith problem of sorts endures: there is still no widely agreed version of what it is that links these two texts, aside from their common author; no widely agreed version of how, if at all, Smith's postulation of self-interest as the (...)
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  39. James A. Dixon, John G. Holden, Daniel Mirman & Damian G. Stephen (2012). Multifractal Dynamics in the Emergence of Cognitive Structure. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (1):51-62.score: 30.0
    The complex-systems approach to cognitive science seeks to move beyond the formalism of information exchange and to situate cognition within the broader formalism of energy flow. Changes in cognitive performance exhibit a fractal (i.e., power-law) relationship between size and time scale. These fractal fluctuations reflect the flow of energy at all scales governing cognition. Information transfer, as traditionally understood in the cognitive sciences, may be a subset of this multiscale energy flow. The cognitive system exhibits not just a single power-law (...)
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  40. Edward T. Dixon (1929). Mathematical Proof. Mind 38 (151):343-351.score: 30.0
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  41. Nicholas Dixon (1992). On Sportsmanship and “Running Up the Score”. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 19 (1):1-13.score: 30.0
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  42. Beth A. Dixon (1996). The Feminist Connection Between Women and Animals. Environmental Ethics 18 (2):181-194.score: 30.0
    Comparison of similarities between women and animals does not necessarily show that animals are oppressed, much less that they are oppressed by patriarchy. Moreover, by seeking to establish symbolic connections, ecofeminists run the risk of essentializing women as emotional and bodily and closer to nature than men. Feminists have little to gain by concentrating exclusively on how the concepts of woman and animal overlap. Likewise, there is little to be gained for animal liberation by comparing women and animals in theory (...)
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  43. Thomas Dixon (2012). “Emotion”: The History of a Keyword in Crisis. Emotion Review 4 (4):1754073912445814.score: 30.0
    The word “emotion” has named a psychological category and a subject for systematic enquiry only since the 19th century. Before then, relevant mental states were categorised variously as “appetites,” “passions,” “affections,” or “sentiments.” The word “emotion” has existed in English since the 17th century, originating as a translation of the French émotion, meaning a physical disturbance. It came into much wider use in 18th-century English, often to refer to mental experiences, becoming a fully fledged theoretical term in the following century, (...)
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  44. Edward T. Dixon (1902). On the Notion of Order. Mind 11 (44):527-534.score: 30.0
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  45. T. Dixon (2002). Scientific Atheism as a Faith Tradition - the Genetic Gods: Evolution and Belief in Human Affairs John C. Avise; Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA & London, 1998, Pp. VIII+279, Price £20.50 Hardback, ISBN 0-674-34625-4, £12.50 Paperback, ISBN 0-674-0033-. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 33 (2):337-359.score: 30.0
  46. S. F., D. G. Ritchie, S. J. & Edward T. Dixon (1899). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 8 (29):118-135.score: 30.0
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  47. Nicholas Dixon (forthcoming). Alcohol and Rape. Public Affairs Quarterly.score: 30.0
  48. Marlene A. Dixon, Brian A. Turner, Donna L. Pastore & Daniel F. Mahony (2003). Rule Violations in Intercollegiate Athletics: A Qualitative Investigation Utilizing an Organizational Justice Framework. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (1):59-90.score: 30.0
    Cheating and rule violations in intercollegiate athletics continue to be relevant issues in many institutions of higher education because they reflect upon the integrity of the institutions in which they are housed, causing concern among many faculty members, administrators, and trustees. Although a great deal of research has documented the numerous rule violations in NCAA intercollegiate athletics, much of it has failed to combine sound theory with practical solutions. The purpose of this study was to examine the possible extensions of (...)
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  49. Nicholas Dixon (1999). On Winning and Athletic Superiority. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 26 (1):10-26.score: 30.0
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  50. Heather Mann, Jason Korzenko, Jonathan S. A. Carriere & Mike J. Dixon (2009). Time–Space Synaesthesia – A Cognitive Advantage? Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):619-627.score: 30.0
    Is synaesthesia cognitively useful? Individuals with time–space synaesthesia experience time units as idiosyncratic spatial forms, and report that these forms aid them in mentally organising their time. In the present study, we hypothesised that time–space synaesthesia would facilitate performance on a time-related cognitive task. Synaesthetes were not specifically recruited for participation; instead, likelihood of time–space synaesthesia was assessed on a continuous scale based on participants’ responses during a semi-structured interview. Participants performed a month-manipulation task, which involved naming every second month (...)
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