Search results for 'Shinto' (try it on Scholar)

83 found
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  1. New Sect Shinto (1976). Shinto Yamatokyo f^ iH^ fnifc 1-2-33 Iwabuchi, Isesaki-shi, Mie-ken 516. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 3:308.
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  2. In Shinto & Early Japanese Buddhism (1984). An Meshcheryakov. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 11:43.
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  3.  4
    Chikao Fujisawa (1961). Zen and Shinto: The Story of Japanese Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 11 (3):170-172.
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  4.  3
    Chikao Fujisawa (1959/1971). Zen and Shinto. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.
  5. Daniel Clarence Holtom (1922/1984). The Political Philosophy of Modern Shintō: A Study of the State Religion on Japan. Ams Press.
  6. Hisashi Matsumoto (2005). Kada Azumamaro No Kokugaku to Shintō Shi. Kōbundō.
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  7. Takashi Matsumoto (2008). Suika Shintō No Hitobito to Nihon Shoki. Kōbundō.
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  8. Tsunetsugu Muraoka (1964/1988). Studies in Shinto Thought. Greenwood Press.
     
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  9. Yūzō Nakano (2009). Kokugakusha No Kami Shinkō: Shintō Shingaku Ni Motozuku Kōsatsu. Kōbundō.
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  10.  8
    Kamata Toji (2016). Shinto Research and the Humanities in Japan. Zygon 51 (1):43-62.
    Three approaches to scholarship are “scholarship as a way,” which aims at perfection of character; “scholarship as a method,” which clearly limits objects and methods in order to achieve precise perception and new knowledge; and “scholarship as an expression,” which takes various approaches to questions and inquiry. The “humanities” participate deeply and broadly in all three of these approaches. In relation to this view of the humanities, Japanese Shinto is a field of study that yields rich results. As a (...)
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  11. James Waldemar Boyd & Ron G. Williams (2005). Japanese Shintō: An Interpretation of a Priestly Perspective. Philosophy East and West 55 (1):33 - 63.
    This is an interpretation of the experiential/religious meaning of Japanese Shrine Shinto as taught us primarily by the priests at Tsubaki Grand Shrine, Suzuka, Mie Prefecture. As a heuristic device, we suggest lines of comparison between the thought and practice of the Tsubaki priests and two Western thinkers: the Jewish philosopher Martin Buber and the French philosopher Georges Bataille. This in turn allows the construction of three interpretive categories that we believe illuminate both the Shintō worldview and Shintō ritual (...)
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  12. James W. Boyd & Ron G. Williams (2005). Japanese Shinto: An Interpretation of a Priestly Perspective. Philosophy East and West 55 (1):33-63.
    : This is an interpretation of the experiential/religious meaning of Japanese Shrine Shintō as taught us primarily by the priests at Tsubaki Grand Shrine, Suzuka, Mie Prefecture. As a heuristic device, we suggest lines of comparison between the thought and practice of the Tsubaki priests and two Western thinkers: the Jewish philosopher Martin Buber and the French philosopher Georges Bataille. This in turn allows the construction of three interpretive categories that we believe illuminate both the Shintō worldview and Shintō ritual (...)
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  13.  12
    Wai-ming Ng (1998). The "I Ching" in the Shinto Thought of Tokugawa Japan. Philosophy East and West 48 (4):568-591.
    The "I Ching" had an important influence on Tokugawa Shinto. First, it played a crucial role in the discussion of Confucian-Shinto relations; many Tokugawa Confucians and Shintoists used it to uphold the doctrine of the unity of Confucianism and Shinto, and Shintoists and scholars of National Learning (kokugaku) used it for its metaphysical and divinational value. Second, scholars of National Learning transformed it from a Confucian classic into a Shinto text, claiming that it was the handiwork (...)
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  14.  5
    Toji Kamata (2008). A Study of Relationship Between Shinto and Japanese Buddhism. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:113-118.
    In complete distinction to the world or universal religions like Christianity and Buddhism, Shinto is an ethnic religion that has grown out of the history and culture of the Japanese people. Shinto is a way of prayer and festivals that arose from a feeling of awe and reverence towards those entities the Japanese feared and respected as "KAMA (gods, divinities)", whereas Buddhism is a system of belief and practice leading to realization and the attainment of Buddhahood. We can (...)
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  15.  10
    Michael Pye (2003). Religion and Conflict in Japan with Special Reference to Shinto and Yasukuni Shrine. Diogenes 50 (3):45-59.
    While Japanese society in some respects appears to be very coherent, its history has frequently been one of internal tension and strife. Factionalism is strong even today, and takes both political and religious forms. When the indigenous Shinto religion was harnessed for political and ideological purposes in the 19th century, during a time of rapid national development, life was made very difficult for other religions such as Buddhism. The post-war Constitution of 1946 provided for the equality of all religions (...)
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  16.  4
    C. B. Jensen & A. Blok (2013). Techno-Animism in Japan: Shinto Cosmograms, Actor-Network Theory, and the Enabling Powers of Non-Human Agencies. Theory, Culture and Society 30 (2):84-115.
    In a wide range of contemporary debates on Japanese cultures of technological practice, brief reference is often made to distinct Shinto legacies, as forming an animist substratum of indigenous spiritual beliefs and cosmological imaginations. Japan has been described as a land of Shinto-infused ‘techno-animism’: exhibiting a ‘polymorphous perversity’ that resolutely ignores boundaries between human, animal, spiritual and mechanical beings. In this article, we deploy instances of Japanese techno-animism as sites of theoretical experimentation on what Bruno Latour calls a (...)
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  17. Jun'ichi Isomae (2014). Religious Discourse in Modern Japankindai Nihon No Shūkyō Gensetsu to Sono Keifu: Shūkyō, Kokka, Shintō: Religion, State, and Shintō. Brill.
    Religious Discourse in Modern Japan explores the transportation of the Western concept of “religion” in in the modern era; the emergence of discourse on Shinto, philosophy, and Buddhism; and the evolution of the academic discipline of religious studies in Japan.
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  18.  9
    A. N. Meshcheryakov (1984). ""The Meaning of" The Beginning" and" The End" in Shinto and Early Japanese Buddhism. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 11 (1):43-56.
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  19.  15
    Fabio Rambelli (2002). The Ritual World of Buddhist "Shinto": The Reikiki and Initiations on Kami-Related Matters in Late Medieval and Early-Modern Japan. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 29 (3-4):265-297.
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  20.  14
    John Nelson (1996). Freedom of Expression: The Very Modern Practice of Visiting a Shinto Shrine. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 23 (1-2):117-153.
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  21.  12
    Nobutaka Inoue & Mark Teeuwen (forthcoming). The Formation of Sect Shinto in Modernizing Japan. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies.
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  22.  12
    R. J. B. (1966). Shinto. Review of Metaphysics 19 (4):817-817.
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  23.  11
    W. Michael Kelsey (1981). Salvation Df the Snake, The Snake of Salvation: Buddhist-Shinto Conflict and Resolution. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 811 (2):83.
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  24. Richard K. Beardsley (1960). Shinto Religion and Japanese Cultural Evolution. In Gertrude Evelyn Dole (ed.), Essays in the Science of Culture. New York, Crowell
     
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  25.  22
    Kakichi Kadowaki (1993). Shinto and Christianity. International Philosophical Quarterly 33 (1):69-89.
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  26.  13
    Helen Hardacre (1994). Response of Buddhism and Shintō to the Issue of Brain Death and Organ Transplant. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (4):585.
    Japan has no law recognizing the condition of brain death as the standard for determining that an individual has died. Instead, it is customary medical practice to declare a person dead when three conditions have been met: cessation of heart beat, cessation of respiration, and opening of the pupils. Of the developed nations, only Japan and Israel do not recognize brain death as the death of the human person.
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  27.  8
    Nakajima Michio (forthcoming). "Shinto Deities That Crossed the Sea: Japan's" Overseas Shrines," 1868 to 1945". Japanese Journal of Religious Studies.
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  28.  19
    Jason M. Wirth (2006). Shinto: The Way Home: Dimensions of Asian Spirituality (Review). Philosophy East and West 56 (2):358-361.
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  29.  7
    Shimazono Susumu (2009). State Shinto in the Lives of the People: The Establishment of Emperor Worship, Modern Nationalism, and Shrine Shinto in Late Meiji. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 36 (1):93-124.
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  30.  12
    K. H. (1960). Zen and Shinto, The Story of Japanese Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 13 (4):700-700.
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  31.  2
    Jack Finegan (1954). The Archeology of World Religions: The Background of Primitivism, Zoroastrianism, Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto, Islam, and Sikhism. Philosophy East and West 3 (4):374-374.
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  32.  6
    Mark Teeuwen & Bernhard Scheid (2002). Tracing Shinto in the History of Kami Worship: Editors' Introduction. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 29 (3/4):195-207.
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  33.  2
    Suga Kōji (forthcoming). A Concept of" Overseas Shinto Shrines": A Pantheistic Attempt by Ogasawara Shōzō and Its Limitations. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies.
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  34.  4
    John Breen (2010). Resurrecting the Sacred Land of Japan: The State of Shinto in the Twenty-First Century. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 37 (2):295-315.
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  35.  3
    Elizabeth Kenney (2000). Shinto Funerals in the Edo Period. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 27 (3-4):239-271.
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  36.  1
    Mark Teeuwen (2010). Reviews: Rethinking Medieval Shintō/Respenser le Shintō Medieval. Special Issue, Cahiers d'Extrême-Asie 16 (2006–2007). [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 37:389-394.
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  37. Walter E. Wright (1995). Stuart DB Picken, Essentials of Shinto: An Analytical Guide to Principal Teachings Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 15 (4):275-276.
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  38.  3
    Mark Teeuwen (2002). From Jindō to Shinto: A Concept Takes Shape. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 29 (3-4):233-263.
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  39.  2
    Allan Grapard (2002). Shrines Registered in Ancient Japanese Law: Shinto or Not? Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 29 (3-4):209-232.
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  40.  2
    Bernhard Scheid (2002). Shinto as a Religion for the Warrior Class: The Case of Yoshikawa Koretaru. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 29 (3-4):299-324.
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  41.  2
    Sugahara Shinkai (1996). The Distinctive Features of Sannō Ichijitsu Shinto. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 23 (1-2):61-84.
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  42.  3
    Willard O. Eddy (1946). Book Review:Asia for the Asiatics? The Techniques of Japanese Occupation. Robert S. Ward; The Japanese Nation: A Social Survey. John F. Embree; Shinto: The Unconquered Enemy. Robert O. Ballou. [REVIEW] Ethics 56 (2):152-.
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  43. Bm Bodartbailey (1984). Religion and Society in the Shinto Perspective. Journal of Dharma 9 (1):68-76.
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  44. Contemporary Social Change & Ueda Kenji (1979). Effects of the Postwar Sociopolitical Situation on Shinto. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 6:303.
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  45. David Doerner (1977). Comparative Analysis of Life After Death in Folk Shinto and Christianity. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 4 (2-3):151-182.
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  46. Wilbur Fridell (1975). The Establishment of Shrine Shinto in Meiji Japan. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 2 (2-3):137-168.
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  47. Jun'ichi Isomae (2007). State Shinto Within the Larger Process of Westernization. In Timothy Fitzgerald (ed.), Religion and the Secular: Historical and Colonial Formations. Equinox Pub. 93.
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  48. Suga Kōji (2010). A Concept of" Overseas Shinto Shrines.". Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 37 (1).
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  49. Aasulv Lande (2010). Reviews: A New History of Shinto. [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 37:385-388.
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  50. Joseph O'leary (1997). Review Of: Brian Bocking, A Popular Dictionary of Shinto; Nāgārjuna in China: A Translation of the Middle Treatise. [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 24 (1-2):210-211.
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