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  1. Shirley Chan (2013). Introduction: Discovering and Rediscovering the Four Books. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (2):224-233.
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  2. Shirley Chan (2012). Cosmology, Society, and Humanity: Tian in the Guodian Texts (Part II)1. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (1):106-120.
    In this sequel of my previous publication, I will continue my discussion of the word tian as it appears in the Guodian texts. I shall argue that, from natural order arises xing, human's distinctive potentiality, which is endowed by heaven to follow and be guided by the heavenly principle. I thereafter will elaborate the sages' role as cultural creators. The distinct roles of heaven and humanity are further deepened when tian and ming are perceived as the determinants of an individual's (...)
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  3. Shirley Chan (2012). Equilibrium in Classical Confucian “Economy”. Open Journal of Philosophy 2 (2):100-106.
    In a modern economy, “equilibrium” means that supply and demand is equal. It is at this point that the allocation of goods and services is at its most efficient, this being because the amount of goods and the amount of goods in demand are equally balanced. The market equilibrium therefore is determined by supply and demand. This paper looks at the concept of “equilibrium” in some of the early Confucian texts and its possible implications in economic activities. In the Confucian (...)
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  4. Shirley Chan (2012). Zhong 中 and Ideal Rulership in the Baoxun 保訓 (Instructions for Preservation) Text of the Tsinghua Collection of Bamboo Slip Manuscripts. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (2):129-145.
  5. Shirley Chan (2011). Cosmology, Society, and Humanity: Tian in the Guodian Texts (Part I)1. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (s1):64-77.
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  6. Shirley Chan (2009). Human Nature and Moral Cultivation in the Guodian 郭店 Text of the Xing Zi Ming Chu 性自命出 (Nature Derives From Mandate). Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (4):361-382.
    The debate over whether human nature is good or bad and how this is related to self-cultivation was central in the minds of traditional Chinese thinkers. This essay analyzes the interrelationship between the key concepts of xing 性 (human nature), qing 情 (human emotions/feelings), and xin 心 (heart-mind) in the Guodian text of the Xing Zi Ming Chu 性自命出 (Nature Derives from Mandate) discovered in 1993 in Hubei province. The intellectual engagements evident in this Guodian text emerge as more syncretic (...)
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