Search results for 'Shlomo Moran' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michael Alekhnovich, Sam Buss, Shlomo Moran & Toniann Pitassi (2001). Minimum Propositional Proof Length is NP-Hard to Linearly Approximate. Journal of Symbolic Logic 66 (1):171-191.
    We prove that the problem of determining the minimum propositional proof length is NP- hard to approximate within a factor of 2 log 1 - o(1) n . These results are very robust in that they hold for almost all natural proof systems, including: Frege systems, extended Frege systems, resolution, Horn resolution, the polynomial calculus, the sequent calculus, the cut-free sequent calculus, as well as the polynomial calculus. Our hardness of approximation results usually apply to proof length measured either by (...)
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  2.  54
    Jane Heal & Richard Moran (2004). Review: Moran's "Authority and Estrangement". [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (2):427 - 432.
  3. Josep E. Corbi, Komarine Romdenh-Romluc, Josep L. Prades, Hilan Bensusan, Manuel de Pinedo, Carla Bagnoli & Richard Moran (2007). On Richard Moran's Authority and Estrangement. Author's Reply. Theoria 22 (58).
     
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  4. Richard Moran (2013). I—Richard Moran: Testimony, Illocution and the Second Person. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 87 (1):115-135.
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  5.  1
    Alexander Razborov (2002). Review: Michael Alekhnovich, Sam Buss, Shlomo Moran, Toniann Pitassi, Minimum Propositional Proof Length Is NP-Hard to Linearly Approximate. [REVIEW] Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 8 (2):301-302.
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  6.  1
    Alexander Razborov (2002). Alekhnovich Michael, Buss Sam, Moran Shlomo, and Pitassi Toniann. Minimum Propositional Proof Length is NP-Hard to Linearly Approximate. The Journal of Symbolic Logic, Vol. 66 (2001), Pp. 171–191. [REVIEW] Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 8 (2):301-302.
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  7. Richard A. Moran (2001). Authority and Estrangement: An Essay on Self-Knowledge. Princeton University Press.
    Since Socrates, and through Descartes to the present day, the problems of self-knowledge have been central to philosophy's understanding of itself. Today the idea of ''first-person authority''--the claim of a distinctive relation each person has toward his or her own mental life--has been challenged from a number of directions, to the point where many doubt the person bears any distinctive relation to his or her own mental life, let alone a privileged one. In Authority and Estrangement, Richard Moran argues (...)
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  8.  58
    Dermot Moran (2000). Introduction to Phenomenology. Routledge.
    Introduction to Phenomenology is an outstanding and comprehensive guide to an important but often little-understood movement in European philosophy. Dermot Moran lucidly examines the contributions of phenomenology's nine seminal thinkers: Brentano, Husserl, Heidegger, Gadamer, Arendt, Levinas, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty and Derrida. Written in a clear and engaging style, this volume charts the course of the movement from its origins in Husserl to its transformation by Derrida. It describes the thought of Heidegger and Sartre, phenomenology's most famous thinkers, and introduces and (...)
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  9.  21
    Richard Moran (1989). Seeing and Believing: Metaphor, Image, and Force. Critical Inquiry 16 (1):87-112.
    One way in which the characteristic gestures of philosophy and criticism differ from each other lies in their involvements with disillusionment, with the undoing of our naivete, especially regarding what we take ourselves to know about the meaning of what we say. Philosophy will often find less than we thought was there, perhaps nothing at all, in what we say about the “external” world, or in our judgments of value, or in our ordinary psychological talk. The work of criticism, on (...)
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  10. Dermot Moran (2005). Edmund Husserl: Founder of Phenomenology. Polity.
    Dermot Moran provides a lucid, engaging, and critical introduction to Edmund Husserl's philosophy, with specific emphasis on his development of phenomenology. This book is a comprehensive guide to Husserl's thought from its origins in nineteenth-century concerns with the nature of scientific knowledge and with psychologism, through his breakthrough discovery of phenomenology and his elucidation of the phenomenological method, to the late analyses of culture and the life-world. Husserl's complex ideas are presented in a clear and expert manner. Individual chapters (...)
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  11. Dermot Moran (2000). Introduction to Phenomenology. Routledge.
    _Introduction to Phenomenology_ is an outstanding and comprehensive guide to phenomenology. Dermot Moran lucidly examines the contributions of phenomenology's nine seminal thinkers: Brentano, Husserl, Heidegger, Gadamer, Arendt, Levinas, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty and Derrida. Written in a clear and engaging style, _Introduction to Phenomenology_ charts the course of the phenomenological movement from its origins in Husserl to its transformation by Derrida. It describes the thought of Heidegger and Sartre, phenomonology's most famous thinkers, and introduces and assesses the distinctive use of phenomonology (...)
     
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  12. Dermot Moran (2000). Introduction to Phenomenology. Routledge.
    _Introduction to Phenomenology_ is an outstanding and comprehensive guide to phenomenology. Dermot Moran lucidly examines the contributions of phenomenology's nine seminal thinkers: Brentano, Husserl, Heidegger, Gadamer, Arendt, Levinas, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty and Derrida. Written in a clear and engaging style, _Introduction to Phenomenology_ charts the course of the phenomenological movement from its origins in Husserl to its transformation by Derrida. It describes the thought of Heidegger and Sartre, phenomonology's most famous thinkers, and introduces and assesses the distinctive use of phenomonology (...)
     
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  13. Gabriel Moran (1996). A Grammar of Responsibility. Crossroad Pub. Co..
    [From Library Journal:] Moran (culture and communication, New York Univ.) is widely known for his many writings on religious education. In the tradition of popular philosophy, he asks what it means to speak of "responsibility" and makes an important distinction between being responsible to and being responsible for. In language accessible to all readers, he considers some current arguments about responsibility, e.g., the responsibility of present-day Germans for the Holocaust or Americans for Hiroshima, and tries to clarify the issue (...)
     
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  14.  2
    Stuart Moran (2011). Reflections on the Readings of Sundays and Feasts: June - August. The Australasian Catholic Record 88 (2):232.
    Moran, Stuart With the solemnity of the Ascension the Year A lectionary returns momentarily to the Gospel according to Matthew and, in fact, to the very end of that Gospel. We might note in the first place that Matthew makes no attempt to describe the mysterious reality that the tradition has come to call the Ascension.
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  15. Richard Moran, Sophie Djigo & Vincent Descombes (2014). Autorité Et Aliénation: Essai Sur la Connaissance de Soi. Vrin.
    Traditionnellement, la philosophie a pensé la connaissance de soi sur le mode problématique d’un sujet faisant de lui-même son propre objet de connaissance. Constatant l’impasse où mène cette approche contemplative de la connaissance de soi, Richard Moran propose de la repenser à partir de la responsabilité de la personne vis-à-vis de ses propres attitudes et de l’autorité de l’agent sur ses propres actions.En abordant la connaissance de soi sous l’angle d’une psychologie morale, Autorité et aliénation la renouvelle en profondeur (...)
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  16. Dermot Moran (2013). Edmund Husserl: Founder of Phenomenology. Polity.
    Dermot Moran provides a lucid, engaging, and critical introduction to Edmund Husserl's philosophy, with specific emphasis on his development of phenomenology. This book is a comprehensive guide to Husserl's thought from its origins in nineteenth-century concerns with the nature of scientific knowledge and with psychologism, through his breakthrough discovery of phenomenology and his elucidation of the phenomenological method, to the late analyses of culture and the life-world. Husserl's complex ideas are presented in a clear and expert manner. Individual chapters (...)
     
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  17. Dermot Moran (2013). Edmund Husserl: Founder of Phenomenology. Polity.
    Dermot Moran provides a lucid, engaging, and critical introduction to Edmund Husserl's philosophy, with specific emphasis on his development of phenomenology. This book is a comprehensive guide to Husserl's thought from its origins in nineteenth-century concerns with the nature of scientific knowledge and with psychologism, through his breakthrough discovery of phenomenology and his elucidation of the phenomenological method, to the late analyses of culture and the life-world. Husserl's complex ideas are presented in a clear and expert manner. Individual chapters (...)
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  18. Dermot Moran (2007). Edmund Husserl: Founder of Phenomenology. Polity.
    Dermot Moran provides a lucid, engaging, and critical introduction to Edmund Husserl's philosophy, with specific emphasis on his development of phenomenology. This book is a comprehensive guide to Husserl's thought from its origins in nineteenth-century concerns with the nature of scientific knowledge and with psychologism, through his breakthrough discovery of phenomenology and his elucidation of the phenomenological method, to the late analyses of culture and the life-world. Husserl's complex ideas are presented in a clear and expert manner. Individual chapters (...)
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  19. Dermot Moran (2013). Edmund Husserl: Founder of Phenomenology. Polity.
    Dermot Moran provides a lucid, engaging, and critical introduction to Edmund Husserl's philosophy, with specific emphasis on his development of phenomenology. This book is a comprehensive guide to Husserl's thought from its origins in nineteenth-century concerns with the nature of scientific knowledge and with psychologism, through his breakthrough discovery of phenomenology and his elucidation of the phenomenological method, to the late analyses of culture and the life-world. Husserl's complex ideas are presented in a clear and expert manner. Individual chapters (...)
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  20. Dermot Moran (ed.) (2012). Logical Investigations Volume 1. Routledge.
    Edmund Husserl is the founder of phenomenology and the _Logical Investigations_ is his most famous work. It had a decisive impact on twentieth century philosophy and is one of few works to have influenced both continental and analytic philosophy. This is the first time both volumes have been available in paperback. They include a new introduction by Dermot Moran, placing the _Investigations_ in historical context and bringing out their contemporary philosophical importance. These editions include a new preface by Sir (...)
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  21. Dermot Moran & Edmund Husserl (eds.) (2001). Logical Investigations Volume 2. Routledge.
    Edmund Husserl is the founder of phenomenology and the _Logical Investigations_ is his most famous work. It had a decisive impact on twentieth century philosophy and is one of few works to have influenced both continental and analytic philosophy. This is the first time both volumes have been available in paperback. They include a new introduction by Dermot Moran, placing the _Investigations_ in historical context and bringing out their contemporary philosophical importance. These editions include a new preface by Sir (...)
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  22. Dermot Moran (ed.) (2015). Logical Investigations Volume 2. Routledge.
    Edmund Husserl is the founder of phenomenology and the _Logical Investigations_ is his most famous work. It had a decisive impact on twentieth century philosophy and is one of few works to have influenced both continental and analytic philosophy. This is the first time both volumes have been available in paperback. They include a new introduction by Dermot Moran, placing the _Investigations_ in historical context and bringing out their contemporary philosophical importance. These editions include a new preface by Sir (...)
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  23. Dermot Moran & Edmund Husserl (eds.) (2001). Logical Investigations Volume 2. Routledge.
    Edmund Husserl is the founder of phenomenology and the _Logical Investigations_ is his most famous work. It had a decisive impact on twentieth century philosophy and is one of few works to have influenced both continental and analytic philosophy. This is the first time both volumes have been available in paperback. They include a new introduction by Dermot Moran, placing the _Investigations_ in historical context and bringing out their contemporary philosophical importance. These editions include a new preface by Sir (...)
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  24. Dermot Moran & Edmund Husserl (eds.) (2001). Logical Investigations Volume 1. Routledge.
    Edmund Husserl is the founder of phenomenology and the _Logical Investigations_ is his most famous work. It had a decisive impact on twentieth century philosophy and is one of few works to have influenced both continental and analytic philosophy. This is the first time both volumes have been available in paperback. They include a new introduction by Dermot Moran, placing the _Investigations_ in historical context and bringing out their contemporary philosophical importance. These editions include a new preface by Sir (...)
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  25. Gabriel Moran (2010). Speaking of Teaching: Lessons From History. Lexington Books.
    Speaking of Teaching: Lessons from History focuses on teaching as a fundamental act of all human beings, viewing the question of teaching through the lens of five famous thinkers and two contemporary problems. Moran argues that teaching is not given the attention that it deserves and proposes to situate school teaching in the context of many forms of teaching. Tracing the history of the idea of teaching from Socrates to Wittgenstein in the first several chapters, this book also examines (...)
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  26. Gabriel Moran (2008). Speaking of Teaching: Lessons From History. Lexington Books.
    Speaking of Teaching: Lessons from History focuses on teaching as a fundamental act of all human beings, viewing the question of teaching through the lens of five famous thinkers and two contemporary problems. Moran argues that teaching is not given the attention that it deserves and proposes to situate school teaching in the context of many forms of teaching. Tracing the history of the idea of teaching from Socrates to Wittgenstein in the first several chapters, this book also examines (...)
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  27.  33
    Dermot Moran (2004). The Philosophy of John Scottus Eriugena: A Study of Idealism in the Middle Ages. Cambridge University Press.
    This work is a substantial contribution to the history of philosophy. Its subject, the ninth-century philosopher John Scottus Eriugena, developed a form of idealism that owed as much to the Greek Neoplatonic tradition as to the Latin fathers and anticipated the priority of the subject in its modern, most radical statement: German idealism. Moran has written the most comprehensive study yet of Eriugena's philosophy, tracing the sources of his thinking and analyzing his most important text, the Periphyseon. This volume (...)
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  28. Dermot Moran (2012). The Philosophy of John Scottus Eriugena: A Study of Idealism in the Middle Ages. Cambridge University Press.
    This work is a substantial contribution to the history of philosophy. Its subject, the ninth-century philosopher John Scottus Eriugena, developed a form of idealism that owed as much to the Greek Neoplatonic tradition as to the Latin fathers and anticipated the priority of the subject in its modern, most radical statement: German idealism. Moran has written the most comprehensive study yet of Eriugena's philosophy, tracing the sources of his thinking and analyzing his most important text, the Periphyseon. This volume (...)
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  29. Dermot Moran (2013). Intentionality: Some Lessons From the History of the Problem From Brentano to the Present. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 21 (3):317-358.
    Intentionality (?directedness?, ?aboutness?) is both a central topic in contemporary philosophy of mind, phenomenology and the cognitive sciences, and one of the themes with which both analytic and Continental philosophers have separately engaged starting from Brentano and Edmund Husserl?s ground-breaking Logical Investigations (1901) through Roderick M. Chisholm, Daniel C. Dennett?s The Intentional Stance, John Searle?s Intentionality, to the recent work of Tim Crane, Robert Brandom, Shaun Gallagher and Dan Zahavi, among many others. In this paper, I shall review recent discussions (...)
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  30. Richard Moran (2005). Getting Told and Being Believed. Philosophers' Imprint 5 (5):1-29.
    The paper argues for the centrality of believing the speaker (as distinct from believing the statement) in the epistemology of testimony, and develops a line of thought from Angus Ross which claims that in telling someone something, the kind of reason for belief that a speaker presents is of an essentially different kind from ordinary evidence. Investigating the nature of the audience's dependence on the speaker's free assurance leads to a discussion of Grice's formulation of non-natural meaning in an epistemological (...)
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  31. Jason S. Moser, Tim P. Moran, Hans S. Schroder, M. Brent Donnellan & Nick Yeung (2014). The Case for Compensatory Processes in the Relationship Between Anxiety and Error Monitoring: A Reply to Proudfit, Inzlicht, and Mennin. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  32. Dermot Moran (2013). From the Natural Attitude to the Life-World. In Lester Embree & Thomas Nenon (eds.), Husserl’s Ideen. Springer 105--124.
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  33. Dermot Moran (2013). 'Let's Look at It Objectively': Why Phenomenology Cannot Be Naturalized. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 72:89-115.
    In recent years there have been attempts to integrate first-person phenomenology into naturalistic science. Traditionally, however, Husserlian phenomenology has been resolutely anti-naturalist. Husserl identified naturalism as the dominant tendency of twentieth-century science and philosophy and he regarded it as an essentially self-refuting doctrine. Naturalism is a point of view or attitude (a reification of the natural attitude into the naturalistic attitude) that does not know that it is an attitude. For phenomenology, naturalism is objectivism. But phenomenology maintains that objectivity is (...)
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  34.  5
    Richard Moran (2016). 2015 Mark Sacks Lecture Williams, History, and ‘the Impurity of Philosophy’. European Journal of Philosophy 24 (2):315-330.
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  35. Richard Moran (1994). The Expression of Feeling in Imagination. Philosophical Review 103 (1):75-106.
  36.  68
    Richard Moran (2012). Self-Knowledge,'Transparency', and the Forms of Activity. In Declan Smithies & Daniel Stoljar (eds.), Introspection and Consciousness. Oxford University Press 211.
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  37.  18
    Thomas Szanto & Dermot Moran (2015). Introduction: Empathy and Collective Intentionality—The Social Philosophy of Edith Stein. Human Studies 38 (4):445-461.
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  38.  62
    Richard Moran (2013). Testimony, Illocution and the Second Person. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 87 (1):115-135.
    The notion of ‘bipolar’ or ‘second-personal’ normativity is often illustrated by such situations as that of one person addressing a complaint to another, or asserting some right, or claiming some authority. This paper argues that the presence of speech acts of various kinds in the development of the idea of the ‘second-personal’ is not accidental. Through development of a notion of ‘illocutionary authority’ I seek to show a role for the ‘second-personal’ in ordinary testimony, despite Darwall's argument that the notion (...)
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  39.  98
    Richard A. Moran (2003). Responses to O'Brien and Shoemaker. European Journal of Philosophy 11 (3):402-19.
  40. Thomas Szanto & Dermot Moran (eds.) (2015). Phenomenology of Sociality: Discovering the ‘We’. Routledge.
    Phenomenological accounts of sociality in Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, Scheler, Schütz, Stein and many others offer powerful lines of arguments to recast current, predominantly analytic, discussions on collective intentionality and social cognition. Against this background, the aim of this volume is to reevaluate, critically and in contemporary terms, the rich phenomenological resources regarding social reality: the interpersonal, collective and communal aspects of the life-world. Specifically, the book pursues three interrelated objectives: it aims 1.) to systematically explore the key phenomenological aspects (...)
     
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  41. Dermot Moran (2008). Husserl's Transcendental Philosophy and the Critique of Naturalism. Continental Philosophy Review 41 (4):401-425.
    Throughout his career, Husserl identifies naturalism as the greatest threat to both the sciences and philosophy. In this paper, I explicate Husserl’s overall diagnosis and critique of naturalism and then examine the specific transcendental aspect of his critique. Husserl agreed with the Neo-Kantians in rejecting naturalism. He has three major critiques of naturalism: First, it (like psychologism and for the same reasons) is ‘countersensical’ in that it denies the very ideal laws that it needs for its own justification. Second, naturalism (...)
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  42.  89
    Gabriel Moran (forthcoming). Book Review: With All Your Mind: A Christian Philosophy of Education. [REVIEW] Interpretation 59 (1):105-105.
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  43.  69
    Kate A. Moran (2009). Can Kant Have an Account of Moral Education? Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (4):471-484.
    There is an apparent tension between Immanuel Kant's model of moral agency and his often-neglected philosophy of moral education. On the one hand, Kant's account of moral knowledge and decision-making seems to be one that can be self-taught. Kant's famous categorical imperative and related 'fact of reason' argument suggest that we learn the content and application of the moral law on our own. On the other hand, Kant has a sophisticated and detailed account of moral education that goes well beyond (...)
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  44. Richard Moran (2005). Problems of Sincerity. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (3):341-361.
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  45. Richard Moran (2004). Anscombe on 'Practical Knowledge'. In J. Hyman & H. Steward (eds.), Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement. Cambridge University Press 43-68.
    Among the legacies of Elizabeth Anscombe's 1957 monograph Intention are the introduction of the notion of 'practical knowledge' into contemporary philosophical discussion of action, and her claim, pursued throughout the book, that an agent's knowledge of what he is doing is characteristically not based on observation.' Each idea by itself has its own obscurities, of course, but my focus here will be on the relation between the two ideas, how it is that the discussion of action may lead us to (...)
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  46.  11
    John Toner, Barbara Gail Montero & Aidan Moran (2015). Considering the Role of Cognitive Control in Expert Performance. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (4):1127-1144.
    Dreyfus and Dreyfus’ influential phenomenological analysis of skill acquisition proposes that expert performance is guided by non-cognitive responses which are fast, effortless and apparently intuitive in nature. Although this model has been criticised for over-emphasising the role that intuition plays in facilitating skilled performance, it does recognise that on occasions a form of ‘detached deliberative rationality’ may be used by experts to improve their performance. However, Dreyfus and Dreyfus see no role for calculative problem solving or deliberation when performance is (...)
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  47.  81
    Dermot Moran (2010). Sartre on Embodiment, Touch, and the ‘Double Sensation’. Philosophy Today 54 (Supplement):135-141.
    The chapter titled “The Body” in Being and Nothingness offers a groundbreaking, if somewhat neglected, philosophical analysis of embodiment. As part of his “es- say on phenomenological ontology,” he is proposing a new multi-dimensional ontological approach to the body. Sartre’s chapter offers a radical approach to the body and to the ‘flesh’. However, it has not been fully appreciated. Sartre offers three ontological dimensions to embodiment. The first “ontological dimension” addresses the way, as Sartre puts it, “I exist my body.” (...)
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  48. Richard Moran (1997). Metaphor. In Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Language. Blackwell Publishing 248-267.
    Metaphor enters contemporary philosophical discussion from a variety of directions. Aside from its obvious importance in poetics, rhetoric, and aesthetics, it also figures in such fields as philosophy of mind (e.g., the question of the metaphorical status of ordinary mental concepts), philosophy of science (e.g, the comparison of metaphors and explanatory models), in epistemology (e.g., analogical reasoning), and in cognitive studies (in, e.g., the theory of concept-formation). This article will concentrate on issues metaphor raises for the philosophy of language, with (...)
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  49.  12
    Dermot Moran & Rodney K. B. Parker (2015). Editors’ Introduction: Resurrecting the Phenomenological Movement. Studia Phaenomenologica 15:11-24.
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  50.  15
    Kate Moran (2015). Kant and Colonialism. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (1):185-188.
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