30 found
Sort by:
  1. Shu-Hsien Liu (2008). Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism (1) : From Cheng Yi to Zhu Xi. In Bo Mou (ed.), Routledge History of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Shu-Hsien Liu (2008). Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism (2) : From Lu Jiuyuan to Wang Yang-Ming. In Bo Mou (ed.), Routledge History of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Zhao Dunhua, Joseph Chan, Albert H. Y. Chen, Yong Huang, Qianfan Zhang & Shu-Hsien Liu (2007). Democracy and Chinese Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (2):161-275.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Shu-Hsien Liu (2007). Democratic Ideal and Practice: A Critical Reflection. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (2):257-275.
  5. Shu-Hsien Liu (2003). An Integral Understanding of Knowledge and Value: A Confucian Perspective. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (3-4):387-401.
  6. Shu-Hsien Liu (2000). On Huang Tsung-Hsi's Understanding of the Mencius. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (3):251–268.
  7. Shu-hsien Liu (1998). Understanding Confucian Philosophy: Classical and Sung-Ming. Greenwood Press.
  8. Shu-Hsien Liu (1998). On the Final Views of Wang Yang-Ming. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (3):345-360.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Shu-Hsien Liu (1996). On New Frontiers of Contemporary Neo-Confucian Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 23 (1):39-58.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Shu-hsien Liu & Kwong-loi Shun (1996). Some Reflections on Mencius' Views of Mind-Heart and Human Nature. Philosophy East and West 46 (2):143-164.
    The origin, content, argumentative basis, practical implication, and influence of Mencius' views of mind-heart and human nature are discussed. While the differences between Confucius and Mencius are acknowledged, it is argued that Mencius' view that human nature is good is consistent with and is a further development of basic ideas in Confucius' thinking. The basis of Mencius' view is not empirical generalization but inner reflection and personal experience, which reveal a shared natural endowment in human beings with a transcendental source. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Shu-Hsien Liu (1995). Reflections on World Peace Through Peace Among Religions - a Confucian Perspective. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (2):193-213.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Shu-Hsien Liu (1993). The Problem of Value Reconstruction in Chinese Philosophy Under the Impact From European Thought. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 20 (1):45-55.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Shu-Hsien Liu (1991). Henry Nelson Wieman and Chinese Philosophy. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 12 (1):49 - 61.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Shu-Hsien Liu (1990). On the Functional Unity of the Four Dimensions of Thought in the Book of Changes. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 17 (3):359-385.
  15. Shu-Hsien Liu (1989). Toward a New Relation Between Humanity and Nature: Reconstructing T'ien-Jen-Ho-I. Zygon 24 (4):457-468.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Shu-Hsien Liu (1986). The Contemporary Significance of Chinese Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 13 (2):203-210.
  17. Shu-Hsien Liu (1984). On Chu Hsi as an Important Source for the Development of the Philosophy of Wang Yang-Ming. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 11 (1):83-107.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Shu-Hsien Liu (1983). How Idealistic is Wang Yang-Ming? Journal of Chinese Philosophy 10 (2):147-168.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Shu-Hsien Liu (1983). Thomé H. Fang, Chinese Philosophy: Its Spirit and Its Development, Linking Publishing Co., Ltd., Taipei, 1981, 568 Pp. [REVIEW] Journal of Chinese Philosophy 10 (4):411-416.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Shu-hsien Liu (1978). Commentary: Theism From a Chinese Perspective. Philosophy East and West 28 (4):413-417.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Shu-hsien Liu (1978). Sinological Torque: An Observation. Philosophy East and West 28 (2):199-207.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Shu-Hsien Liu (1978). The Function of the Mind in Chu Hsi's Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 5 (2):195-208.
  23. Shu-Hsien Liu (1974). Biobibliographical Note on T'ang Chün-I. Contemporary Chinese Thought 5 (4):110-111.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Shu-hsien Liu (1974). Time and Temporality: The Chinese Perspective. Philosophy East and West 24 (2):145-153.
    Although the chinese have a heightened sense of time, The concepts of time and temporality developed in their culture are remarkably different from those developed in the west. Certain time-Concepts familiar to the westerners are completely lacking in the chinese tradition. For example, The chinese lacked the concept of absolute time as that held by newton, They also lacked a system to record the years in a linear progressive way, And they seem to have shown a lack of drive to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Shu-Hsien Liu (1974). The Use of Analogy and Symbolism in Traditional Chinese Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 1 (3-4):313-338.
  26. Shu-hsien Liu (1972). A Philosophic Analysis of the Confucian Approach to Ethics. Philosophy East and West 22 (4):417-425.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Shu-Hsien Liu (1972). The Confucian Approach to the Problem of Transcendence and Immanence. Philosophy East and West 22 (1):45-52.
    The problem of transcendence and immanence is a central issue in every great religious tradition. It is indeed the understanding of the relation between the transcendent and man that determines the character of a religious faith. The transcendent, However, May assume different forms; it need not always be a supreme personal God in the judaeo-Christian sense. In the confucian tradition, Heaven is the transcendent; hence the problem of transcendence and immanence becomes the problem of heaven and man. In this article, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Shu-hsien Liu (1971). The Contemporary Development of a Neo-Confucian Epistemology. Inquiry 14 (1-4):19 – 40.
    Until recently epistemology in the Western sense was never a central issue in Chinese philosophy. Contemporary Chinese neo?Confucian philosophers, however, realize that in order to reconstruct some of the important traditional philosophical insights and make them meaningful in the present time, certain methodological and epistemological considerations are indispensable. The present paper undertakes to examine some of these efforts. Since most neo?Confucian philosophers today have been influenced by Hsiung Shih?li, in one way or another, his epistemological theory is presented first. Then (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Shu-hsien Liu (1971). The Religious Import of Confucian Philosophy: Its Traditional Outlook and Contemporary Significance. Philosophy East and West 21 (2):157-175.
    Confucianism has usually been regarded as a secular moral philosophy with no religious import at all. In china, However, Confucianism has been mentioned along with buddhism and taoism as one of the three religions (the so-Called san-Chiao) for centuries. This means that we must revise and broaden our traditional concept of religion. The confucian tradition certainly has its unique way of expressing its ultimate and therefore religious concern. The present essay is an attempt to uncover the religious import in confucian (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Shu-hsien Liu (1969). Hsiung Shih-Li's Theory of Causation. Philosophy East and West 19 (4):399-407.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation