Search results for 'Shun Kwong-Loi' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  91
    Kwong-loi Shun (1997). Mencius and Early Chinese Thought. Stanford University Press.
    Throughout much of Chinese history, Mencius (372-289 BC) was considered the greatest Confucian thinker after Confucius himself. Following the enshrinement of the Mencius (an edited compilation of his thought by disciples) as one of the Four Books by Sung neo-Confucianists, he was studied by all educated Chinese. This book begins a reassessment of Mencius by studying his ethical thinking in relation to that of other early Chinese thinkers, including Confucius, Mo Tzu, the Yangists, and Hsün Tzu. The author closely examines (...)
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  2.  32
    Kwong-loi Shun & David B. Wong (eds.) (2004). Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community. Cambridge.
    The Chinese ethical tradition has often been thought to oppose Western views of the self--as autonomous and possessed of individual rights--with views that emphasize the centrality of relationship and community to the self. The essays in this collection discuss the validity of that contrast as it concerns Confucianism, the single most influential Chinese school of thought. (Alasdair MacIntyre, who has significantly articulated the need for dialogue across traditions, contributes a concluding essay of commentary.).
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  3.  45
    Kwong-loi Shun (1993). Jen and Li in the "Analects". Philosophy East and West 43 (3):457-479.
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  4.  26
    Kwong-Loi Shun (1989). Moral Reasons in Confucian Ethics. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 16 (3-4):317-343.
  5.  25
    Kwong-loi Shun (1991). Mencius' Criticism of Mohism: An Analysis of "Meng Tzu" 3a:. Philosophy East and West 41 (2):203-214.
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  6. Kwong-loi Shun (2002). Ren 仁 and Li 禮 in the Analects. In Bryan W. Van Norden (ed.), Confucius and the Analects: New Essays. OUP Usa 53--72.
     
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  7.  42
    Shu-hsien Liu & Kwong-loi Shun (1996). Some Reflections on Mencius' Views of Mind-Heart and Human Nature. Philosophy East and West 46 (2):143-164.
    The origin, content, argumentative basis, practical implication, and influence of Mencius' views of mind-heart and human nature are discussed. While the differences between Confucius and Mencius are acknowledged, it is argued that Mencius' view that human nature is good is consistent with and is a further development of basic ideas in Confucius' thinking. The basis of Mencius' view is not empirical generalization but inner reflection and personal experience, which reveal a shared natural endowment in human beings with a transcendental source. (...)
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  8.  5
    Kwong-loi Shun (2015). Contextualizing Early Confucian Discourse: Comments on David B. Wong. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (2):203-210.
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  9.  10
    Kwong-Loi Shun (1988). A Ready Reference to Philosophy East and West. Teaching Philosophy 11 (4):371-373.
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  10.  5
    John Carriero, Michael Ferejohn, Michael Jubien, Philip Kain, Kwong-Loi Shun, David W. Smith, Michael Tye, Julie Van Camp & Georgia Warnke (2000). Richard Arneson University of California, San Diego Alison Leigh Brown Northern Arizona University. Philosophical Studies 99 (1).
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  11.  13
    Kwong-Loi Shun (1991). Mencius and the Mind‐Dependence of Morality: An Analysis of Meng Tzu 6a‐a‐51: (I) the Mind‐Inherence and the Mind‐Dependence of Morality. [REVIEW] Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (2):169-193.
  12.  21
    Kwong-Loi Shun (2010). Zhu XI on the “Internal” and the “External”: A Response to Chan Lee. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (4):639-654.
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  13.  24
    Kwong-loi Shun (1997). Mencius on Jen-Hsing. Philosophy East and West 47 (1):1-20.
    The use of the term hsing in the Meng-tzu is discussed, along with Mencius' views on jen-hsing. It is argued that while the use of hsing need not connote something unlearned and shared, Mencius did view jen-hsing in terms of certain unlearned emotional predispositions shared by all jen. He regarded jen as a species distinguished from other animals by its capability of cultural accomplishment, and felt that it is the presence of the emotional predispositions that makes this possible.
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  14.  9
    Kwong-Loi Shun (1991). Mencius and the Mind-Inherence of Morality: Mencius' Rejection of Kao Tzu's Maxim in Meng Tzu 2a:2 1: I. Kao Tzu's Maxim. [REVIEW] Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (4):371-386.
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  15.  12
    Kwong-Loi Shun (1995). Confucian Ethics of the Axial Age: A Reconstruction Under the Aspect of the Breakthrough Toward Postconventional Thinking by Heiner Roetz. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (3):351-362.
  16. Kwong-loi Shun (2004). Conception of the Person in Early Confucian Thought. In Kwong-loi Shun & David B. Wong (eds.), Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community. Cambridge 183--199.
  17.  12
    Kwong-Loi Shun (1991). The Self in Confucian Ethics. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (1):25-35.
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  18.  3
    Kwong Loi Shun, Mencius. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  19.  6
    Kwong-Loi Shun (2005). Zhu Xi on Gong (Impartial) and Si (Partial). Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (1):1-9.
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  20.  6
    Kwong-Loi Shun (1996). Ideal Motivations and Reflective Understanding. American Philosophical Quarterly 33 (1):91 - 104.
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  21. Kwong-loi Shun (2008). Wholeness in Confucian Thought : Zhu XI on Cheng, Zhong, Xin, and Jing. In Zhongying Cheng & On Cho Ng (eds.), The Imperative of Understanding: Chinese Philosophy, Comparative Philosophy, and Onto-Hermeneutics: A Tribute Volume Dedicated to Professor Chung-Ying Cheng. Global Scholarly Publications
     
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  22. Kwong-loi Shun (1985). Intending As a Means. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 66 (1/2):216.
     
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  23.  30
    Qingsong Shen & Kwong-loi Shun (eds.) (2007). Confucian Ethics in Retrospect and Prospect. Council for Research in Values and Philosophy.
    desire. It is misleading to say that shu concerns the nature of desire in the ordinary sense, for it has more to do with the manner of satisfaction than ...
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  24. Kwong-Loi Shun & David B. Wong (eds.) (2006). Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community. Cambridge University Press.
    The Chinese ethical tradition has often been thought to oppose Western views of the self as autonomous and possessed of individual rights with views that emphasize the centrality of relationship and community to the self. The essays in this collection discuss the validity of that contrast as it concerns Confucianism, the single most influential Chinese school of thought. Alasdair MacIntyre, the single most influential philosopher to articulate the need for dialogue across traditions, contributes a concluding essay of commentary. This is (...)
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  25. Kwong-Loi Shun & David B. Wong (eds.) (2009). Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community. Cambridge University Press.
    The Chinese ethical tradition has often been thought to oppose Western views of the self as autonomous and possessed of individual rights with views that emphasize the centrality of relationship and community to the self. The essays in this collection discuss the validity of that contrast as it concerns Confucianism, the single most influential Chinese school of thought. Alasdair MacIntyre, the single most influential philosopher to articulate the need for dialogue across traditions, contributes a concluding essay of commentary. This is (...)
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  26. Kwong-Loi Shun & David B. Wong (eds.) (2004). Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community. Cambridge University Press.
    The Chinese ethical tradition has often been thought to oppose Western views of the self as autonomous and possessed of individual rights with views that emphasize the centrality of relationship and community to the self. The essays in this collection discuss the validity of that contrast as it concerns Confucianism, the single most influential Chinese school of thought. Alasdair MacIntyre, the single most influential philosopher to articulate the need for dialogue across traditions, contributes a concluding essay of commentary. This is (...)
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  27. James Lenman, Tamar Schapiro, Daniel Statman, Harry Brighouse, Adam Swift & John Martin Fischer (2006). 10. Kwong‐Loi Shun and David Wong, Eds., Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community Kwong‐Loi Shun and David Wong, Eds., Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community (Pp. 156-160). [REVIEW] Ethics 117 (1).
  28.  2
    Bryan W. Van Norden (1991). Kwong-Loi Shun on Moral Reasons in Mencius. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (4):353.
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  29.  14
    Stephen C. Angle (2005). Review of kWong-Loi Shun, David B. Wong (Eds.), Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (12).
  30.  10
    Philip J. Ivanhoe (2006). Kwong‐Loi Shun and David Wong, Eds., Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community:Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community. [REVIEW] Ethics 117 (1):156-160.
  31.  1
    Chad Hansen (1999). Review of Mencius and Early Chinese Thought by Kwong-Loi Shun. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 49 (2):207-209.
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  32. Wing-Cheuk Chan (2005). Kwong-Loi Shun and David B. Wong, Eds., Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy and Community Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 25 (5):385-387.
     
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  33. H. Chad (1999). Mencius and Early Chinese Thought, by Kwong-Loi Shun. Philosophy East and West 49:207-208.
     
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  34. Kwong-Ioi Shun (2003). Philosophy of Human Nature. In A. S. Cua (ed.), Encyclopedia of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge 554--558.
     
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  35.  40
    Shun Kwong-loi (2009). Studying Confucian and Comparative Ethics: Methodological Reflections. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (3):455-478.
  36.  12
    Bryan W. Van Norden, Kwong-Loi Shun on Moral Reasons & In Mencius (1991). Црря Штат Штт. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18:353-370.
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  37.  10
    Shun Kwong-Loi (2011). Wang Yang-Ming on Self-Cultivation in the Daxue. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (s1):96-113.
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  38.  1
    Shun Kwong‐Loi (2014). Dai Zhen on Nature and Pattern. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 41 (1-2):5-17.
    The article discusses Dai Zhen's views on pattern. For Dai, pattern has to do with ensuring that the means by which one attains one's emotional propensities and satisfies one's desires will not prevent others from doing the same. The heart/mind has the capacity to know pattern on such basis and such knowledge will guide action. Ethical failure is due to a deficiency in knowledge, and self-cultivation involves developing one's capacity to know so that one can grasp the pattern in any (...)
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  39. Bryan William Van Norden (1991). Mencian Philosophic Psychology. Dissertation, Stanford University
    This dissertation is an investigation of the philosophic psychology of Mengzi , a Chinese Confucian of the 4th century B.C. As such, it is concerned with the role of desires, emotions, and practical reasoning in Mengzi's conception of self-cultivation and ethical flourishing. In chapter 1, I discuss why Mengzi is still worth studying by philosophers, certain hermeneutic issues, and the historical factors that account for some of the characteristic differences between Chinese and Western philosophy. ;In chapter 2, I proceed to (...)
     
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  40.  22
    Michele Loi (2012). Introduction: Genetics and Justice. Ethical Perspectives 19 (1):1-10.
    Introduction to the Ethical Perspectives Theme Issue (19/1) on Genetics and Justice, with contributions by Greg Bognar, David Hunter, Michele Loi, Oliver Feeney, Vilhjálmur Arnason, Durnin et al.
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  41. Antonio Loi (forthcoming). Lassù sulle Montagne Dei sardi. Annali Della Facoltà di Lettere E Filosofia.
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  42. Michele Loi, Lorenzo Del Savio & Elia Stupka (2013). Social Epigenetics and Equality of Opportunity. Public Health Ethics 6 (2):142-153.
    Recent epidemiological reports of associations between socioeconomic status and epigenetic markers that predict vulnerability to diseases are bringing to light substantial biological effects of social inequalities. Here, we start the discussion of the moral consequences of these findings. We firstly highlight their explanatory importance in the context of the research program on the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) and the social determinants of health. In the second section, we review some theories of the moral status of health inequalities. (...)
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  43.  8
    Raymond Loi, Long W. Lam & Ka Wai Chan (2012). Coping with Job Insecurity: The Role of Procedural Justice, Ethical Leadership and Power Distance Orientation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 108 (3):361-372.
    This study examines the relationship between procedural justice and employee job insecurity, and the boundary conditions of this relationship. Drawing upon uncertainty management theory and ethical leadership research, we hypothesized that procedural justice is negatively related to job insecurity, and that this relationship is moderated by ethical leadership. We further predicted that the moderating relationship would be more pronounced among employees with a low power distance orientation. We tested our hypotheses using a sample of 381 workers in Macau and Southern (...)
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  44.  14
    Jack M. C. Kwong (forthcoming). Is Open-Mindedness Conducive to Truth? Synthese:1-14.
    Open-mindedness is generally regarded as an intellectual virtue because its exercise reliably leads to truth. However, some theorists have argued that open-mindedness’s truth-conduciveness is highly contingent, pointing out that it is either not truth-conducive at all under certain scenarios or no better than dogmatism or credulity in others. Given such shaky ties to truth, it would appear that the status of open-mindedness as an intellectual virtue is in jeopardy. In this paper, I propose to defend open-mindedness against these challenges. In (...)
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  45.  9
    Kenneth K. Kwong, Oliver H. M. Yau, Jenny S. Y. Lee, Leo Y. M. Sin & C. B. Alan (2003). The Effects of Attitudinal and Demographic Factors on Intention to Buy Pirated CDs: The Case of Chinese Consumers. Journal of Business Ethics 47 (3):223-235.
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  46.  15
    Michele Loi (2015). Technological Unemployment and Human Disenhancement. Ethics and Information Technology 17 (3):201-210.
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  47.  19
    Kenneth K. Kwong, Oliver H. M. Yau, Jenny S. Y. Lee, Leo Y. M. Sin & Alan C. B. Tse (2003). The Effects of Attitudinal and Demographic Factors on Intention to Buy Pirated CDs: The Case of Chinese Consumers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 47 (3):223 - 235.
    This study examines the impact of attitude toward piracy on intention to buy pirated CDs using Chinese samples. Attitude toward piracy is measured by a multi-item scale that has been shown to have a consistent factor structure with four distinct components, namely, social cost of piracy, anti-big business attitude, social benefit of dissemination, and ethical belief. Our findings reveal that social benefit of dissemination and anti-big business attitude have a positive relationship with intention to buy pirated CDs while social cost (...)
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  48.  49
    Jack M. C. Kwong (2011). Resisting Aliefs: Gendler on Belief-Discordant Behaviors. Philosophical Psychology 25 (1):77 - 91.
    This paper challenges T. S. Gendler's notion of aliefs, a novel kind of mental state which she introduces to explain a wide variety of belief-discordant behaviors. In particular, I argue that many of the cases which she uses to motivate such a mental state can be fully explained by accounts that make use only of commonplace attitudes such as beliefs and desires.
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  49.  13
    Jack M. C. Kwong (forthcoming). Open-Mindedness as a Critical Virtue. Topoi.
    This paper proposes to examine Daniel Cohen’s recent attempt to apply virtues to argumentation theory, with special attention given to his explication of how open-mindedness can be regarded as an argumentational or critical virtue. It is argued that his analysis involves a contentious claim about open-mindedness as an epistemic virtue, which generates a tension for agents who are simultaneously both an arguer and a knower (or who strive to be both). I contend that this tension can be eased or resolved (...)
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  50.  48
    M. Loi (2013). You Cannot Have Your Normal Functioning Cake and Eat It Too. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (12):748-751.
    Does biomedical enhancement challenge justice in health care? This paper argues that health care justice based on the concept of normal functioning is inadequate if enhancements are widespread. Two different interpretations of normal functioning are distinguished: the “species typical” vs. the “normal cooperator” account, showing that each version of the theory fails to account for certain egalitarian intuitions about help and assistance owed to people with health needs, where enhancements are widespread.
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