10 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Shyam Ranganathan (York University)
  1. Shyam Ranganathan (2013). Justification and the Truth-Connection Clayton Littlejohn Cambridge University Press, 2012; 269 Pp. $100.95 (Hardback). [REVIEW] Dialogue 52 (2):413-415.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Shyam Ranganathan (2011). An Archimedean Point for Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 42 (4):479-519.
    According to the orthodox account of meaning and translation in the literature, meaning is a property of expressions of a language, and translation is a matching of synonymous expressions across languages. This linguistic account of translation gives rise to well-known skeptical conclusions about translation, objectivity, meaning and truth, but it does not conform to our best translational practices. In contrast, I argue for a textual account of meaning based on the concept of a TEXT-TYPE that does conform to our best (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Shyam Ranganathan (2010). Does Kant Hold That Ought Implies Can? In J. Sharma A. Raguramaraju (ed.), Grounding Morality. Routledge. 60.
    Undergraduate students of philosophy are often told that Kant is famous for teaching us that “ought implies can,” and furthermore that this principle implies that it makes no sense to tell someone that they ought to do something if they do not have the ability to execute the action in question. It is thus surprising to find that the words “ought implies can” do not appear conspicuously in popular English translations of Kant’s main moral philosophical texts (such as the Groundwork, (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Shyam Ranganathan (2008). Patanjali's Yoga Sutra. Penguin.
    Patañjali’s Yoga Sutra (second century CE) is the basic text of one of the nine canonical schools of Indian philosophy. In it the legendary author lays down the blueprint for success in yoga, now practiced the world over. Patañjali draws upon many ideas of his time, and the result is a unique work of Indian moral philosophy that has been the foundational text for the practice of yoga since. The Yoga Sutra sets out a sophisticated theory of moral psychology and (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Shyam Ranganathan (2007). Ethics and the History of Indian Philosophy. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.
    Ethics and the History of Indian Philosophy (Motilal Banarsidass 2007). Regretfully, it is not an uncommon view in orthodox Indology that Indian philosophers were not interested in ethics. This claim belies the fact that Indian philosophical schools were generally interested in the practical consequences of beliefs and actions. The most popular symptom of this concern is the doctrine of karma, according to which the consequences of actions have an evaluative valence. Ethics and the History of Indian Philosophy argues that the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Shyam Ranganathan (2007). Of Language, Translation Theory and a Third Way in Semantics. Essays in Philosophy 8 (1):1.
    Translation theory and the philosophy of language have largely gone their separate ways (the former opting to rebrand itself as “translation studies” to emphasize its empirical and anti-theoretical underpinnings). Yet translation theory and the philosophy of language have predominately shared a common assumption that stands in the way of determinate translation. It is that languages, not texts, are the objects of translation and the subjects of semantics. The way to overcome the theoretical problems surrounding the possibility and determinacy of translation (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Shyam Ranganathan (2007). Reply to Nicholas Gier. Philosophy East and West 57 (4):564-566.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Shyam Ranganathan (2007). The Virtue of Nonviolence (Review). Philosophy East and West 57 (1):115-120.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Shyam Ranganathan, Hindu Philosophy. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The compound “Hindu philosophy” is ambiguous. Minimally it stands for a tradition of Indian philosophical thinking. However, it could be interpreted as designating one comprehensive philosophical doctrine, shared by all Hindu thinkers. The term “Hindu philosophy” is often used loosely in this philosophical or doctrinal sense, but this usage is misleading. There is no single, comprehensive philosophical doctrine shared by all Hindus that distinguishes their view from contrary philosophical views associated with other Indian religious movements such as Buddhism or Jainism (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Shyam Ranganathan, Ramanuja. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Rāmānuja (ācārya), the eleventh century South Indian philosopher, is the chief proponent of Vishishtādvaita, which is one of the three main forms of the Orthodox Hindu philosophical school, Vedānta. As the prime philosopher of the Vishishtādvaita tradition, Rāmānuja is one of the Indian philosophical tradition’s most important and influential figures. He was the first Indian philosopher to provide a systematic theistic interpretation of the philosophy of the Vedas, and is famous for arguing for the epistemic and soteriological significance of bhakti, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation