Search results for 'Sian Sullivan' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Philip Anthony Stott & Sian Sullivan (eds.) (2000). Political Ecology: Science, Myth and Power. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
    Political ecology has developed as an academic discipline in reaction to the increased concern of nations and individuals about humanity's adverse impact on the environment and the ways international bodies have moved to counter this impact. This new text draws together international experts at the cutting edge of this new field to focus on real world examples of problems and the tension between developed and developing states.
     
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  2. Sian Sullivan (2000). Desertification" in North-West Namibia. In Philip Anthony Stott & Sian Sullivan (eds.), Political Ecology: Science, Myth and Power. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
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  3. Peter Sullivan, 32 Peter M. Sullivan.score: 180.0
    Define ‘het’ as a predicate that truly applies to itself if and only if it does not truly apply to itself and which also truly applies to any predicate that does not truly apply to its own name. We know that the attempted definition of ‘hes’ is a failure, and so a fortiori is that of ‘het’. Similarly, there is no Qussell class which contains itself as a member if and only if it does not contain itself as a member, (...)
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  4. Peter Sullivan (2003). Ineffability and Nonsense. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77 (1):195–223.score: 60.0
    [A. W. Moore] There are criteria of ineffability whereby, even if the concept of ineffability can never serve to modify truth, it can sometimes (non-trivially) serve to modify other things, specifically understanding. This allows for a reappraisal of the dispute between those who adopt a traditional reading of Wittgenstein's Tractatus and those who adopt the new reading recently championed by Diamond, Conant, and others. By maintaining that what the nonsense in the Tractatus is supposed to convey is ineffable understanding, rather (...)
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  5. William M. Sullivan & Will Kymlicka (eds.) (2007). The Globalization of Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Sullivan and Kymlicka seek to provide an alternative to post-9/11 pessimism about the ability of serious ethical dialogue to resolve disagreements and conflict across national, religious, and cultural differences. It begins by acknowledging the gravity of the problem: on our tightly interconnected planet, entire populations look for moral guidance to a variety of religious and cultural traditions, and these often stiffen, rather than soften, opposing moral perceptions. How, then, to set minimal standards for the treatment of persons while developing (...)
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  6. Shannon Sullivan (2000). Feminism and Phenomenology: A Reply to Silvia Stoller. Hypatia 15 (1):183-188.score: 60.0
    : Responding to Silvia Stoller's comments on "Domination and Dialogue in Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception" (Sullivan 1997), I argue that while phenomenology has much to offer feminism, feminists should be wary of Merleau-Ponty's notion of projective intentionality because of the ethical solipsism that it tends to involve. I also take the opportunity to clarify the concept of hypothetical construction introduced in the earlier paper, in particular the transformative relationship that it has to pre-reflective experience.
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  7. Stefan Sullivan (2002). Marx for a Postcommunist Era: On Poverty, Corruption, and Banality. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Marx for a Post-Communist Era: On Poverty, Corruption and Banality is a clear and accessible exploration of why Marx still matters today. Despite the countless autopsies on Marx that followed the collapse of the iron curtain, many argue that Marxist ideas are as relevant as ever in the post-communist world. Stefan Sullivan begins with a historical overview of Marx and the development of Marxist thought, before concentrating on the application of Marx's ideas to specific post-1989 features of global capitalism. (...)
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  8. Woodruff Sullivan (2012). Nineteenth-Century Catalogues of Nebulae and Star Clusters. Metascience 21 (2):493-495.score: 60.0
    Nineteenth-century catalogues of nebulae and star clusters Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9593-6 Authors Woodruff T. Sullivan, Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  9. Celestine J. Sullivan (1958). Critical and Historical Reflections on Spinoza's "Ethics.". Berkeley, University of California Press.score: 60.0
    CRITICAL AND HISTORICAL REFLECTIONS ON SPINOZA'S "ETHICS" BY CELESTINE J. SULLIVAN, JB, Benedict Spinoza wrote very little. If the urgency of certain ...
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  10. Shannon Sullivan (2002). Pragmatist Feminism as Ecological Ontology: Reflections On. Hypatia 17 (4):201-217.score: 60.0
    : In my response to the comments of Vincent Colapietro, Charlene Seigfried, and Gail Weiss on Living Across and Through Skins (Sullivan 2001), I explain pragmatist feminism as an ecological ontology that understands bodies and environments as dynamically co-constitutive. I then discuss the relationship of pragmatist feminism to phenomenology, psychoanalysis, Nietzschean genealogy, and Darwinian evolutionary theory. Some of the specific concepts I examine include the anonymous body, the bodying organism, truth as transactional flourishing, and the preservation of racial and (...)
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  11. E. Thomas Sullivan (2009). Proportionality Principles in American Law: Controlling Excessive Government Actions. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Across a wide range of legal contexts, E. Thomas Sullivan and Richard S. Frase identify three basic ways that government measures and private remedies have been ...
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  12. Nikki Sullivan (2003). A Critical Introduction to Queer Theory. New York University Press.score: 60.0
    "This book is a succinct, pedagogically designed introduction. As classroom text, Sullivan's work is heady with vibrant debate and slim heuristics; her intellectual clarity is stunning." - Choice A Critical Introduction to Queer Theory explores the ways in which sexuality, subjectivity and sociality have been discursively produced in various historical and cultural contexts. The book begins by putting gay and lesbian sexuality and politics in historical context and demonstrates how and why queer theory emerged in the West in the (...)
     
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  13. Shannon Sullivan (2001). Living Across and Through Skins: Transactional Bodies, Pragmatism, and Feminism. Indiana University Press.score: 60.0
    According to Shannon Sullivan, thinking about the body as being in transaction with its social, political, cultural, and physical surroundings is not a new idea.
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  14. Jacqueline Anne Sullivan (2010). A Role for Representation in Cognitive Neurobiology. Philosophy of Science (Supplement) 77 (5):875-887.score: 30.0
    What role does the concept of representation play in the contexts of experimentation and explanation in cognitive neurobiology? In this article, a distinction is drawn between minimal and substantive roles for representation. It is argued by appeal to a case study that representation currently plays a role in cognitive neurobiology somewhere in between minimal and substantive and that this is problematic given the ultimate explanatory goals of cognitive neurobiological research. It is suggested that what is needed is for representation to (...)
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  15. Thomas D. Sullivan (1998). Rationality in Science, Religion, and Everyday Life. Faith and Philosophy 15 (3):394-397.score: 30.0
  16. Joel Smith & Peter Sullivan (eds.) (2011). Transcendental Philosophy and Naturalism. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Transcendental Philosophy and Naturalism assesses the present state and contemporary relevance of this tradition.
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  17. Peter M. Sullivan (1996). The 'Truth' in Solipsism, and Wittgenstein's Rejection of the A Priori. European Journal of Philosophy 4 (2):195-220.score: 30.0
  18. Peter Sullivan, A Version of the Picture Theory.score: 30.0
    0. My aims in this paper are largely expository: I am more interested in presenting the picture theory than deciding its truth. Even so, I hope that the arguments by which I develop the theory will do something to support it, since I believe that what I will present as Wittgenstein's view is indeed the truth. This is not an admission of insanity, though some things that have been thought intrinsic to the picture theory are things it would be insane (...)
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  19. Peter M. Sullivan (2002). On Trying to Be Resolute: A Response to Kremer on the Tractatus. European Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):43–78.score: 30.0
    A way of reading the Tractatus has been proposed which, according to its advocates, is importantly novel and essentially distinct from anything to be found in the work of such previously influential students of the book as Anscombe, Stenius, Hacker or Pears. The point of difference is differently described, but the currently most used description seems to be Goldfarb’s term ‘resolution’ – hence one speaks of ‘the (or a) resolute reading’. I’ll shortly ask what resolution is. For now, it (...)
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  20. Harold Kincaid & Jacqueline Anne Sullivan (2014). Classifying Psychopathology: Mental Kinds and Natural Kinds. In Classifying Psychopathology: Mental Kinds and Natural Kinds. 1-10.score: 30.0
     
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  21. Jacqueline Anne Sullivan (2009). The Multiplicity of Experimental Protocols: A Challenge to Reductionist and Non-Reductionist Models of the Unity of Neuroscience. Synthese 167 (3):511 - 539.score: 30.0
    Descriptive accounts of the nature of explanation in neuroscience and the global goals of such explanation have recently proliferated in the philosophy of neuroscience (e.g., Bechtel, Mental mechanisms: Philosophical perspectives on cognitive neuroscience. New York: Lawrence Erlbaum, 2007; Bickle, Philosophy and neuroscience: A ruthlessly reductive account. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishing, 2003; Bickle, Synthese, 151, 411–434, 2006; Craver, Explaining the brain: Mechanisms and the mosaic unity of neuroscience. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007) and with them new understandings of the <span class='Hi'>experimental</span> (...)
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  22. Jacqueline Anne Sullivan (2010). Reconsidering 'Spatial Memory' and the Morris Water Maze. Synthese 177 (2):261-283.score: 30.0
    The Morris water maze has been put forward in the philosophy of neuroscience as an example of an experimental arrangement that may be used to delineate the cognitive faculty of spatial memory (e.g., Craver and Darden, Theory and method in the neurosciences, University of Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, 2001; Craver, Explaining the brain: Mechanisms and the mosaic unity of neuroscience, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2007). However, in the experimental and review literature on the water maze throughout the history of its use, (...)
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  23. Peter M. Sullivan (2005). Identity Theories of Truth and the Tractatus. Philosophical Investigations 28 (1):43–62.score: 30.0
    The paper is concerned with the idea that the world is the totality of facts, not of things – with what is involved in thinking of the world in that way, and why one might do so. It approaches this issue through a comparison between Wittgenstein’s Tractatus and the identity theory of truth proposed by Hornsby and McDowell.The paper’s positive conclusion is that there is a genuine affinity between these two. A negative contention is that the modern identity theory (...)
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  24. Peter Sullivan & Michael Potter (1997). Hale on Caesar. Philosophia Mathematica 5 (2):135--52.score: 30.0
    Crispin Wright and Bob Hale have defended the strategy of defining the natural numbers contextually against the objection which led Frege himself to reject it, namely the so-called ‘Julius Caesar problem’. To do this they have formulated principles (called sortal inclusion principles) designed to ensure that numbers are distinct from any objects, such as persons, a proper grasp of which could not be afforded by the contextual definition. We discuss whether either Hale or Wright has provided independent motivation for a (...)
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  25. Arthur Sullivan (2005). Rigid Designation, Direct Reference, and Modal Metaphysics. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 86 (4):577–599.score: 30.0
    In this paper I argue that questions about the semantics of rigid designation are commonly and illicitly run together with distinct issues, such as questions about the metaphysics of essence and questions about the theoretical legitimacy of the possible-worlds framework. I discuss in depth two case studies of this phenomenon – the first concerns the relation between rigid designation and reference, the second concerns the application of the notion of rigidity to general terms. I end by drawing out some conclusions (...)
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  26. Jacqueline Anne Sullivan (2010). Realization, Explanation and the Mind-Body Relation Editor's Introduction. Synthese 177 (2):151-164.score: 30.0
    This volume brings together a number of perspectives on the nature of realization explanation and experimentation in the ‘special’ and biological sciences as well as the related issues of psychoneural reduction and cognitive extension. The first two papers in the volume may be regarded as offering direct responses to the questions: (1) What model of realization is appropriate for understanding the metaphysics of science? and (2) What kind of philosophical work is such a model ultimately supposed to do?
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  27. Peter M. Sullivan (2005). What is Squiggle? Ramsey on Wittgenstein's Theory of Judgement. In Hallvard Lillehammer & D. H. Mellor (eds.), Ramsey's Legacy. Oxford University Press. 53--71.score: 30.0
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  28. Meghan Sullivan (2012). The Minimal A-Theory. Philosophical Studies 158 (2):149-174.score: 30.0
    Timothy Williamson thinks that every object is a necessary, eternal existent. In defense of his view, Williamson appeals primarily to considerations from modal and tense logic. While I am uncertain about his modal claims, I think there are good metaphysical reasons to believe permanentism: the principle that everything always exists. B-theorists of time and change have long denied that objects change with respect to unqualified existence. But aside from Williamson, nearly all A-theorists defend temporaryism: the principle that there are temporary (...)
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  29. Peter M. Sullivan (2004). ‘The General Propositional Form is a Variable’ (Tractatus 4.53). Mind 113 (449):43-56.score: 30.0
    Wittgenstein presents in the Tractatus a variable purporting to capture the general form of proposition. One understanding of what Wittgenstein is doing there, an understanding in line with the ‘new’ reading of his work championed by Diamond, Conant and others, sees it as a deflationary or even an implosive move—a move by which a concept sometimes put by philosophers to distinctively metaphysical use is replaced, in a perspicuous notation, by an innocent device of generalization, thereby dispersing the clouds of (...)
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  30. Peter M. Sullivan (2000). The Totality of Facts. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 100 (2):175–192.score: 30.0
    Wittgenstein, in the Tractatus, conceives the world as ‘the totality of facts’. Type-stratification threatens that conception : the totality of facts is an obvious example of an illegitimate totality. Wittgenstein’s notion of truthoperation evidently has some role to play in avoiding that threat, allowing propositions, and so facts, to constitute a single type. The paper seeks to explain that role in a way that integrates the ‘philosophical’ and ‘technical’ pressures on the notion of an operation.
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  31. Arthur Sullivan (2007). Rigid Designation and Semantic Structure. Philosophers' Imprint 7 (6):1-22.score: 30.0
    There is a considerable sub-literature, stretching back over 35 years, addressed to the question: Precisely which general terms ought to be classified as rigid designators? More fundamentally: What should we take the criterion for rigidity to be, for general terms? The aim of this paper is to give new grounds for the old view that if a general term designates the same kind in all possible worlds, then it should be classified as a rigid designator. The new grounds in question (...)
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  32. Roger J. Sullivan (1994). An Introduction to Kant's Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    This is the most up-to-date, brief and accessible introduction to Kant's ethics available. It approaches the moral theory via the political philosophy, thus allowing the reader to appreciate why Kant argued that the legal structure for any civil society must have a moral basis. This approach also explains why Kant thought that our basic moral norms should serve as laws of conduct for everyone. The volume includes a detailed commentary on Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals, Kant's most widely studied (...)
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  33. Michael Potter & Peter Sullivan (2005). What Is Wrong with Abstraction? Philosophia Mathematica 13 (2):187-193.score: 30.0
    We correct a misunderstanding by Hale and Wright of an objection we raised earlier to their abstractionist programme for rehabilitating logicism in the foundations of mathematics.
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  34. Meghan Sullivan (2014). Change We Can Believe In (and Assert). Noûs 48 (3):474-495.score: 30.0
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  35. Jacqueline Anne Sullivan (2008). Memory Consolidation, Multiple Realizations, and Modest Reductions. Philosophy of Science 75 (5):501-513.score: 30.0
    This article investigates several consequences of a recent trend in philosophy of mind to shift the relata of realization from mental state–physical state to function‐mechanism. It is shown, by applying both frameworks to the neuroscientific case study of memory consolidation, that, although this shift can be used to avoid the immediate antireductionist consequences of the traditional argument from multiple realizability, what is gained is a far more modest form of reductionism than recent philosophical accounts have intimated and neuroscientists themselves have (...)
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  36. Arthur Sullivan (2013). Multiple Propositions, Contextual Variability, and the Semantics/Pragmatics Interface. Synthese 190 (14):2773-2800.score: 30.0
    A ‘multiple-proposition (MP) phenomenon’ is a putative counterexample to the widespread implicit assumption that a simple indicative sentence (relative to a context of utterance) semantically expresses at most one proposition. Several philosophers and linguists (including Stephen Neale and Chris Potts) have recently developed hypotheses concerning this notion. The guiding questions motivating this research are: (1) Is there an interesting and homogenous semantic category of MP phenomena? (2) If so, what is the import? Do MP theories have any relevance to important (...)
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  37. Shannon Sullivan (2008). Whiteness as Wise Provincialism: Royce and the Rehabilitation of a Racial Category. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (2):pp. 236-262.score: 30.0
    Against the backdrop of eliminitivist versus critical conservationist approaches to the racial category of whiteness, this article asks whether a rehabilitated version of whiteness can be worked out concretely. What might a non-oppressive, anti-racist whiteness look like? Turning to Josiah Royce’s “Provincialism” for help answering this question, I show that even though the essay never explicitly discusses race, it can help explain the ongoing need for the category of whiteness and implicitly offers a wealth of useful suggestions for how to (...)
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  38. Nikki Sullivan (2008). Dis-Orienting Paraphilias? Disability, Desire, and the Question of (Bio)Ethics. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2/3):183-192.score: 30.0
    In 1977 John Money published the first modern case histories of what he called ‘apotemnophilia’, literally meaning ‘amputation love’ [Money et al., The Journal of Sex Research, 13(2):115–12523, 1977], thus from its inception as a clinically authorized phenomenon, the desire for the amputation of a healthy limb or limbs was constituted as a sexual perversion conceptually related to other so-called paraphilias. This paper engages with sex-based accounts of amputation-related desires and practices, not in order to substantiate the paraphilic model, but (...)
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  39. Roger J. Sullivan (1989). Immanuel Kant's Moral Theory. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    This comprehensive, lucid, and systematic commentary on Kant's practical (or moral) philosophy is sure to become a standard reference work. Kant is arguably the most important moral philosopher of the modern period, yet, prior to this detailed study, there have been no attempts to treat all of his work in this area in a single volume. Using as nontechnical a language as possible, the author offers a detailed, authoritative account of Kant's moral philosophy, including his ethical theory, his philosophy of (...)
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  40. Peter M. Sullivan (2003). Simplicity and Analysis in Early Wittgenstein. European Journal of Philosophy 11 (1):72–88.score: 30.0
    But logic as it stands, e.g. in Principia Mathematica, can quite well be applied to our ordinary propositions; e.g. from ‘All men are mortal’ and ‘Socrates is a man’ there follows according to this logic ‘Socrates is mortal’, which is obviously correct, even though I equally obviously do not know what structure is possessed by the thing Socrates or the property of mortality. Here they just function as simple objects.
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  41. Terence Sullivan (2007). The Mind Ain't Just in the Head-Defending and Extending the Extended Mind. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 6:145-149.score: 30.0
    Andy Clark and David Chalmers have recently argued that the world beyond our skin can constitute part of the mind. That is, our minds can and sometimes do extend beyond our heads and bodies. Clark and Chalmers refer to this claim as the 'Extended Mind'. After illustrating the Extended Mind via a thought-experiment I turn to consider a criticism made by Lawrence Shapiro. After outlining Shapiro's claim I will show that in fact this does little to call into to doubt (...)
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  42. Barbara Allen, Nancy Meyers, John Sullivan & Melissa Sullivan (2002). American Sign Language and End-of-Life Care: Research in the Deaf Community. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 14 (3):197-208.score: 30.0
    We describe how a Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) process was used to develop a means of discussing end-of-life care needs of Deaf seniors. This process identified a variety of communication issues to be addressed in working with this special population. We overview the unique linguistic and cultural characteristics of this community and their implications for working with Deaf individuals to provide information for making informed decisions about end-of-life care, including completion of health care directives. Our research and our work with (...)
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  43. Nancy Tuana & Shannon Sullivan (2006). Introduction: Feminist Epistemologies of Ignorance. Hypatia 21 (3).score: 30.0
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  44. Meghan Sullivan (2012). Problems for Temporary Existence in Tense Logic. Philosophy Compass 7 (1):43-57.score: 30.0
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  45. Peter M. Sullivan (2010). Michael Dummett's Frege. In Tom Ricketts & Michael D. Potter (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Frege. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
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  46. Shannon Sullivan (2000). Reconfiguring Gender with John Dewey: Habit, Bodies, and Cultural Change. Hypatia 15 (1):23-42.score: 30.0
    : This paper demonstrates how John Dewey's notion of habit can help us understand gender as a constitutive structure of bodily existence. Bringing Dewey's pragmatism in conjunction with Judith Butler's concept of performativity, I provide an account of how rigid binary configurations of gender might be transformed at the level of both individual habit and cultural construct.
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  47. Shannon Sullivan (2004). Ethical Slippages, Shattered Horizons, and the Zebra Striping of the Unconscious: Fanon on Social, Bodily, and Psychical Space. Philosophy and Geography 7 (1):9-24.score: 30.0
    While Sigmund Freud and Maurice Merleau?Ponty both acknowledge the role that spatiality plays in human life, neither pays any explicit attention to the intersections of race and space. It is Franz Fanon who uses psychoanalysis and phenomenology to provide an account of how the psychical and lived bodily existence of black people is racially constituted by a racist world. More precisely, as I argue in this paper, Fanon's work demonstrates how psychical and bodily spatiality cannot be adequately understood apart from (...)
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  48. Shannon Sullivan (2007). On Revealing Whiteness: A Reply to Critics. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 21 (3):pp. 231-242.score: 30.0
  49. Arthur Sullivan (2008). Truth in Virtue of Meaning. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 38 (3):pp. 373-397.score: 30.0
    In recent work on a priori justification, one thing about which there is considerable agreement is that the notion of truth in virtue of meaning is bankrupt and infertile. (For the sake of more readable prose, I will use ‘TVM’ as an abbreviation for ‘the notion of truth in virtue of meaning’.) Arguments against the worth of TVM can be found across the entire spectrum of views on the a priori, in the work of uncompromising rationalists (such as BonJour (1998)), (...)
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  50. Mark D. Sullivan (2002). The Meaning of Facial Expressions of Pain Lies in Their Use, Not in Their Reference. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):472-473.score: 30.0
    As a product of natural selection, pain behavior must serve an adaptive function for the species beyond the accurate portrayal of the pain experience. Pain behavior does not simply refer to the pain experience, but promotes survival of the species in various and complex ways. This means that there is no purely respondent or operant pain behavior found in nature.
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