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  1. Stefon J. R. Van Noordt & Sidney J. Segalowitz (2012). Performance Monitoring and the Medial Prefrontal Cortex: A Review of Individual Differences and Context Effects as a Window on Self-Regulation. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:197-197.
    The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is central to self-regulation and has been implicated in generating a cluster of event-related potential components, collectively referred to as medial frontal negativities (MFNs). These MFNs are elicited while individuals monitor behavioural and environmental consequences, and include the error-related negativity, Nogo N2, and the feedback-related negativity. A growing cognitive and affective neuroscience literature indicates that the activation of the anterior cingulate cortex and surrounding medial prefrontal regions during performance monitoring is not only influenced by task (...)
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  2. Sidney J. Segalowitz (2007). Whose Free Will is It Anyway? Or, The Illusion of Determinism. In Henri Cohen & Brigitte Stemmer (eds.), Consciousness and Cognition: Fragments of Mind and Brain. Elxevier Academic Press.
  3. Sidney J. Segalowitz & Korri Lane (2004). Perceptual Fluency and Lexical Access for Function Versus Content Words. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (2):307-308.
    By examining single-word reading times (in full sentences read for meaning), we show that (1) function words are accessed faster than content words, independent of perceptual characteristics; (2) previous failures to show this involved problems of frequency range and task used; and (3) these differences in lexical access are related to perceptual fluency. We relate these findings to issues in the literature on event-related potentials (ERPs) and neurolinguistics.
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  4. Sidney J. Segalowitz (1999). Why Twin Studies Really Don't Tell Us Much About Human Heritability. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):904-905.
    The derivation of heritability from human twin studies involves serious methodological flaws. Heritability is consistently overestimated because of biological confounds of twinning, consistent and often gross underestimation of the environmental variance, and nonadditive genetic influences that can hugely exaggerate heritability values. Despite this bad research design, behaviour geneticists continue to publish results implying that their heritability results are valid.
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  5. Sidney J. Segalowitz & Daniel Bernstein (1997). Neural Networks and Neuroscience. In David Martel Johnson & Christina E. Erneling (eds.), The Future of the Cognitive Revolution. Oxford University Press. 209.
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