Search results for 'Sight' (try it on Scholar)

732 found
Sort by:
See also:
  1. A. D. Smith (2000). Space and Sight. Mind 109 (435):481-518.score: 24.0
    This paper, which has both a historical and a polemical aspect, investigates the view, dominant throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, that the sense of sight is, originally, not phenomenally three-dimensional in character, and that we must come to interpret its properly two-dimensional data by reference to the sense of 'touch'. The principal argument for this claim, due to Berkeley, is examined and found wanting. The supposedly confirming findings concerning 'Molyneux subjects' are also investigated and are shown to be (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Gerald Vision (1989). Sight and Cognition. Metaphilosophy 20 (January):12-33.score: 21.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Virgil C. Aldrich (1974). Sight and Light. American Philosophical Quarterly 11 (October):317-322.score: 21.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Ralph Schumacher (2003). What Are the Direct Objects of Sight? Locke on the Molyneux Question. Locke Studies 3:41-62.score: 21.0
  5. Donald Quinlan (1970). Effects of Sight of the Body and Active Locomotion in Perceptual Adaptation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (1):91.score: 21.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Arthur B. Fitt (1917). The Estimation of Distances by Sight and Passive Touch: Some Investigations Into the Evolution of the Sense of Touch. Journal of Experimental Psychology 2 (4):264-288.score: 21.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Michael Martin (1992). Sight and Touch. In Tim Crane (ed.), The Contents of Experience. New York: Cambridge University Press.score: 21.0
  8. Ludovic Soutif (2008). Logical Space and the Space of Sight: The Relevance of Wittgenstein's Arguments to Recent Issues in the Philosophy of Mind. Dialogue 47 (3-4):501-536.score: 18.0
    In this paper I show and discuss the relevance of Wittgenstein´s arguments as to the spatial nature of sight for recent issues in the philosophy of mind. The first, bearing upon the dimensionality of the manifolds at play in depiction, plays a critical role in Clark´s attempt to provide an independent account of qualia and of their differentiative properties. The second, pertaining to the properly spatial structure formed by the data of sight, is explicitly appealed to in the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Dominic Lopes (2005). Sight and Sensibility. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Sight and Sensibility will be essential reading for anyone working in aesthetics and art theory, and for all those intrigued by the power of images to affect ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Kathrin Friedrich (2010). 'Sehkollektiv': Sight Styles in Diagnostic Computed Tomography. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 2 (3):185-195.score: 18.0
    This paper aims to trace individual as well as collective aspects of ‘sight styles’ in diagnostic computed tomography. Radiologists need to efficiently translate the visualized data from the living human body into a reliable and significant diagnosis. During this process, their visual thinking and the created images are incorporated into a complex network of other visualizations, communication strategies, professional traditions, and (tacit) visual knowledge. To investigate the interplay of collective as well as individual dimensions of diagnostic seeing, the concept (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Dominic McIver Lopes (2007). Sight and Sensibility: Evaluating Pictures. Clarendon Press.score: 18.0
    Images have power - for good or ill. They may challenge us to see things anew and, in widening our experience, profoundly change who we are. The change can be ugly, as with propaganda, or enriching, as with many works of art. Sight and Sensibility explores the impact of images on what we know, how we see, and the moral assessments we make. Dominic Lopes shows how these are part of, not separate from, the aesthetic appeal of images. His (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Mark Hannam, The Sight of Death.score: 18.0
    A review of T J Clark's "The Sight of Death", published by Yale University Press in 2006.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Shannon Mariotti (2009). On the Passing of the First-Born Son: Emerson's "Focal Distancing," Du Bois' "Second Sight," and Disruptive Particularity. Political Theory 37 (3):351 - 374.score: 18.0
    Both Ralph Waldo Emerson's and W. E. B. Du Bois' firstborn sons tragically died at very young ages. Drawing from the essays where they write about their grief, I explore Du Bois' "subversion" and "revision" of Emerson's thought by contrasting their visual metaphors: Emerson's "focal distancing" and Du Bois' practice of "second sight" and seeing through "the Veil." I show how the disruptive particular event of the deaths of their sons causes both to challenge the idealist elements of their (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Christian Maurer (2014). On 'Love at First Sight'. In Christian Maurer, Tony Milligan & Kamila Pacovská (eds.), Love and Its Objects: What Can We Care For? Palgrave Macmillan. 160-174.score: 18.0
    This essay focuses on the early phases of romantic love and investigates the phenomenon that is often referred to as ‘Love at First Sight’, where typically very little information about the other is available, yet intensely felt causal processes are at work. It argues that the phenomenon called ‘Love at First Sight’ is not love in a proper sense, even if it may resemble love in certain aspects, and even if, under certain conditions, it may lead into love (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Suzannah Biernoff (2002). Sight and Embodiment in the Middle Ages. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 18.0
    Sight and Embodiment in the Middle Ages breaks new ground by bringing postmodern writings on vision and embodiment into dialogue with medieval texts and images: an interdisciplinary strategy that illuminates and complicates both cultures. This is an invaluable reference work for anyone interested in the history and theory of visuality, and it is essential reading or scholars of art, science, or spirituality in the medieval period.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Emmanuel Alloa (2007). The Madness of Sight. In Karin Leonhard & Silke Horstkotte (eds.), Seeing Perception. Cambridge Scholars Publishing: 40-59.score: 15.0
    Viewing Vermeer with Merleau-Ponty's eyes.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Hans Jonas (1954). The Nobility of Sight. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 14 (4):507-519.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Richard Hanley (2004). No End in Sight: Causal Loops in Philosophy, Physics and Fiction. Synthese 141 (1):123 - 152.score: 15.0
    There have been many objections to the possibility oftime travel. But all the truly interesting ones concern the possibility of reversecausation. What is objectionable about reverse causation? I diagnose that the trulyinteresting objections are to a further possibility: that of causal loops. I raisedoubts about whether there must be causal loops if reverse causation obtains; but devote themajority of the paper to describing, and dispelling concerns about, various kinds ofcausal loop. In short, I argue that they are neither logically nor (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Thomas Crowther (2009). Watching, Sight, and the Temporal Shape of Perceptual Activity. Philosophical Review 118 (1):1-27.score: 15.0
    There has been relatively little discussion, in contemporary philosophy of mind, of the active aspects of perceptual processes. This essay presents and offers some preliminary development of a view about what it is for an agent to watch a particular material object throughout a period of time. On this view, watching is a kind of perceptual activity distinguished by a distinctive epistemic role. The essay presents a puzzle about watching an object that arises through elementary reflection on the consequences of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. G. M. Stratton (1899). The Spatial Harmony of Touch and Sight. Mind 8 (32):492-505.score: 15.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Ian Hacking (1980). Is the End in Sight for Epistemology? Journal of Philosophy 77 (10):579-588.score: 15.0
  22. Lawrence Weiskrantz (2002). Prime-Sight and Blindsight. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):568-581.score: 15.0
    Listening to subject’s commentaries can be a useful spur to novel scientific departures, as in studies of blindsight. Recently further testing has been possible with subject DB, who was a blindsight patient tested intensively over a period of 10 years and who was the subject of the book, . Essentially his original capacity is the same or somewhat more sensitive. Some further types of discriminations have now been tested that were not possible in the original study. But a new feature (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Robert Hopkins (2004). Painting, Sculpture, Sight, and Touch. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (2):149-166.score: 15.0
    I raise two questions that bear on the aesthetics of painting and sculpture. First, painting involves perspective, in the sense that everything represented in a painting is represented from a point, or points, within represented space; is sculpture also perspectival? Second, painting is specially linked to vision; is sculpture linked in this way either to vision or to touch? To clarify the link between painting and vision, I describe the perspectival structure of vision. Since this is the same structure we (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Mark S. Muldoon (1996). Silence Revisited: Taking the Sight Out of Auditory Qualities. Review of Metaphysics 50 (2):275-298.score: 15.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Melvyn A. Goodale & A. David Milner (2004/2005). Sight Unseen: An Exploration of Conscious and Unconscious Vision. Oxford University Press.score: 15.0
    Vision, more than any other sense, dominates our mental life. Our visual experience is just so rich, so detailed, that we can hardly distinguish that experience from the world itself. Even when we just think about the world and don't look at it directly, we can't help but 'imagine' what it looks like. We think of 'seeing' as being a conscious activity--we direct our eyes, we choose what we look at, we register what we are seeing. The series of events (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. John Protevi (1998). The "Sense" of "Sight": Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty on the Meaning of Bodily and Existential Sight. Research in Phenomenology 28 (1):211-223.score: 15.0
  27. Per Anderson (2003). Christian Batalden Scharen, Married in the Sight of God: Theology, Ethics and Church Debates Over Homosexuality. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 37 (2):275-279.score: 15.0
  28. Jeffrey C. Alexander (1991). Sociological Theory and the Claim to Reason: Why the End is Not in Sight. Sociological Theory 9 (2):147-153.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Robert Van Gulick (1999). Out of Sight but Not Out of Mind: Isomorphism and Absent Qualia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (6):974-974.score: 15.0
    The isomorphism constraint places plausible limits on the use of third-person evidence to explain color experience but poses no difficulty for functionalists; they themselves argue for just such limits. Palmer's absent qualia claim is supported by neither the Color Machine nor Color Room examples. The nature of color experience depends on relations external to the color space, as well as internal to it.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. H. V. Stainsby (1970). Sight and Sense-Data. Mind 79 (April):170-187.score: 15.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Katerina Bantinaki (2006). Review of Dominic Mciver Lopes, Sight and Sensibility: Evaluating Pictures. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (4).score: 15.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Mark T. Brown & D. Besner (2004). In Sight but Out of Mind: Do Competing Views Test the Limits of Perception Without Awareness? Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):421-429.score: 15.0
    Over a century’s worth of research suggests that “perception” without awareness is a genuine phenomenon. However, relatively little research has explored the question of whether all visually presented information activates representations in long term memory without awareness. Two experiments explored the use of a figure–ground display consisting of competing views in which one view dominates the other such that subjects are unaware of the non-dominant view. Neither experiment provided evidence that the non-dominant view activated its representation in long term memory (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Joseph John Murphy (1876). Space Through Sight and Touch. Mind 1 (2):284-285.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Ceri T. Trevethan, Arash Sahraie & Larry Weiskrantz (2007). Can Blindsight Be Superior to 'Sighted-Sight?'. Cognition 103 (3):491-501.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. D. W. Hamlyn (1962). Space and Sight: The Perception of Space and Shape in the Congenitally Blind Before and After Operation. By M. Von Senden. (Methuen. 1960. Pp. 348. Price 42s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 37 (139):80-.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Robert Hopkins (2006). With Sight Too Much in Mind, Mind Too Little in Sight? Philosophical Books 47 (4):293-305.score: 15.0
    This is a critical notice of Colin McGinn's 'Mindsight'.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Katia Duscherer & Daniel Holender (2002). No Negative Semantic Priming From Unconscious Flanker Words in Sight. Journal of Experimental Psychology 28 (4):839-853.score: 15.0
  38. Julius Rocca (2008). Two Hippocratic Treaties On Sight_ and _On Anatomy. Early Science and Medicine 13 (5):509-510.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Antonio Beltrán Marí (2005). El “caso Galileo”, sin final previsible (The “Galileo's case”, no end in sight). Theoria 20 (2):125-141.score: 15.0
    La Iglesia ha dado por zanjado el caso Galileo en más de una ocasion. No obstante, la polémica ha continuado. Aquí se argumenta que las distintas iniciativas de la Iglesia respecto al caso Galileo -la revision de la condena dei copernicanismo a partir de 1820; la utilización de los documentos dei dossier inquisitorial de Galileo a partir de 1850 y la polémica suscitada; el caso Paschini (1942-1965); y las conclusiones de Juan Pablo II en 1992-1993- ponen de manifiesto la misma (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Dan Cavedon-Taylor (2013). Seeing and Retinal Stability: On a Sensorimotor Argument for the Necessity of Eye Movement for Sight. Philosophical Psychology 26 (2):263 - 266.score: 15.0
    Sensorimotor theorists of perception have argued that eye movement is a necessary condition for seeing on the basis that subjects whose retinal images do not move undergo a form of blindness. I show that the argument does not work.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. M. H. Pirenne (1953). Physiological Mechanisms in the Perception of Distance by Sight and Berkeley's Theory of Vision. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 4 (13):13-21.score: 15.0
  42. Alan Cowey (1995). Blindsight in Real Sight. Nature 377:290-1.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Jacques Paillard, F. Michel & C. E. Stelmach (1983). Localization Without Content: A Tactile Analogue of "Blind Sight". Archives of Neurology 40:548-51.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Anna Szabolcsi, Hidden in Plain Sight: Overt Subjects in Infinitival Control and Raising Complements, 2007-2009.score: 15.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Eliot F. Krieger (1993). Insights About Inner Sight. Grazer Philosophische Studien 45:21-39.score: 15.0
    Using the later works of Wittgenstein, this paper investigates the intricate ways in which the will is related to mental imagery. It examines how "seeing" is subject to the will in a different way from "forming an image". Although it is unwise to posit a model of images which maintains that images are directly willed inner objects - just like outer objects, only located in our heads - this model is often incorrectly embraced by philosophers and psychologists. A proper understanding (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. J. F. Worthen (1995). Joseph Butler's Case for Virtue: Conscience as a Power of Sight in a Darkened World. Journal of Religious Ethics 23 (2):239 - 261.score: 15.0
    The eclipse of interest in Joseph Butler's analysis of the relation of conscience and action and the dismissal of his ethics on the grounds that the argument is flawed by circularity and/or the naturalistic fallacy are both a consequence of the failure of scholars to attend to the complex design of his work considered as a whole. The seldom studied Sermon XV is pivotal to understanding Butler's conception of failure and possibility. While it builds on the familiar arguments of Sermons (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. D. G. Collingridge (1978). Berkeley on Space, Sight and Touch. Philosophy 53 (203):102 - 105.score: 15.0
    In his Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision Berkeley argues that it is only a happy accident that we are aware of space and objects in space by means of vision, and that the logically primary way in which we are aware of space is by touch. Berkeley's argument is that all connections between the visual and the spatial properties of things are contingent. Thus we may judge an object's distance from us by noting the number and size of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Mark Rollins (2006). Sight and Sensibility: Evaluating Pictures Edited by Lopes, Dominic Mciver. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (4):479–482.score: 15.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Grant Allen (1881). Sight and Smell in Vertebrates. Mind 6 (24):453-471.score: 15.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Lois Shepherd & Margaret Foster Riley (2012). In Plain Sight: A Solution to a Fundamental Challenge in Human Research. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):970-989.score: 15.0
    The physician-researcher conflict of interest has thus far eluded satisfactory solution. Most attempts to deal with it focus on improving informed consent. But those attempts are not successful and may even make things worse. Research subjects are already voluntarily undertaking the risks of research — we should not ask them to go it alone — to undergo medical “treatment” without medical “care.” The only effective solution is that in much clinical research, each research subject should have a doctor independent from (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 732