Search results for 'Sign' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  4
    David Vinson, Pamela Perniss, Neil Fox & Gabriella Vigliocco (2016). Comprehending Sentences With the Body: Action Compatibility in British Sign Language? Cognitive Science 40 (7):n/a-n/a.
    Previous studies show that reading sentences about actions leads to specific motor activity associated with actually performing those actions. We investigate how sign language input may modulate motor activation, using British Sign Language sentences, some of which explicitly encode direction of motion, versus written English, where motion is only implied. We find no evidence of action simulation in BSL comprehension, but we find effects of action simulation in comprehension of written English sentences by deaf native BSL signers. These (...)
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  2.  56
    Guy Bouchard (1983). The Pseudo-Metaphysics of the Sign. Semiotics:447-461.
    The sign is often defined as a thing standing for another, the first one being sensible, and the second, intelligible. Authors like Derrida and Kristeva link this definition to a "métaphysique de la présence". This paper shows that they are quite mistaken, and all the more so when one distinguishes the constitutive and factorial definitions of the sign: "rather than the sign being an index of 'the' Occidental metaphysics, it is the so-called Occidental metaphysics that is an (...)
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  3. Catherine Legg (2006). Review of Anne Freadman. The Machinery of Talk: Charles Peirce and the Sign Hypothesis. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (4):642-645.
    This book, officially a contribution to the subject area of Charles Peirce’s semiotics, deserves a wider readership, including philosophers. Its subject matter is what might be termed the great question of how signification is brought about (what Peirce called the ‘riddle of the Sphinx’, who in Emerson’s poem famously asked, ‘Who taught thee me to name?’), and also Peirce’s answer to the question (what Peirce himself called his ‘guess at the riddle’, and Freadman calls his ‘sign hypothesis’).
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  4.  25
    Philippe Schlenker (2011). Donkey Anaphora: The View From Sign Language (ASL and LSF). [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 34 (4):341-395.
    There are two main approaches to the problem of donkey anaphora (e.g. If John owns a donkey , he beats it ). Proponents of dynamic approaches take the pronoun to be a logical variable, but they revise the semantics of quantifiers so as to allow them to bind variables that are not within their syntactic scope. Older dynamic approaches took this measure to apply solely to existential quantifiers; recent dynamic approaches have extended it to all quantifiers. By contrast, proponents of (...)
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  5.  8
    Chloë R. Marshall & Gary Morgan (2015). From Gesture to Sign Language: Conventionalization of Classifier Constructions by Adult Hearing Learners of British Sign Language. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):61-80.
    There has long been interest in why languages are shaped the way they are, and in the relationship between sign language and gesture. In sign languages, entity classifiers are handshapes that encode how objects move, how they are located relative to one another, and how multiple objects of the same type are distributed in space. Previous studies have shown that hearing adults who are asked to use only manual gestures to describe how objects move in space will use (...)
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  6.  35
    Ivano Caponigro & Kathryn Davidson (2011). Ask, and Tell as Well: Question–Answer Clauses in American Sign Language. Natural Language Semantics 19 (4):323-371.
    A construction is found in American Sign Language that we call a Question–Answer Clause. It is made of two parts: the first part looks like an interrogative clause conveying a question, while the second part resembles a declarative clause answering that question. The very same signer has to sign both, the entire construction is interpreted as truth-conditionally equivalent to a declarative sentence, and it can be uttered only under certain discourse conditions. These and other properties of Question–Answer Clauses (...)
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  7.  10
    Pamela Perniss, Asli Özyürek & Gary Morgan (2015). The Influence of the Visual Modality on Language Structure and Conventionalization: Insights From Sign Language and Gesture. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):2-11.
    For humans, the ability to communicate and use language is instantiated not only in the vocal modality but also in the visual modality. The main examples of this are sign languages and gestures. Sign languages, the natural languages of Deaf communities, use systematic and conventionalized movements of the hands, face, and body for linguistic expression. Co-speech gestures, though non-linguistic, are produced in tight semantic and temporal integration with speech and constitute an integral part of language together with speech. (...)
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  8.  9
    Pamela Perniss & Asli Özyürek (2015). Visible Cohesion: A Comparison of Reference Tracking in Sign, Speech, and Co‐Speech Gesture. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):36-60.
    Establishing and maintaining reference is a crucial part of discourse. In spoken languages, differential linguistic devices mark referents occurring in different referential contexts, that is, introduction, maintenance, and re-introduction contexts. Speakers using gestures as well as users of sign languages have also been shown to mark referents differentially depending on the referential context. This article investigates the modality-specific contribution of the visual modality in marking referential context by providing a direct comparison between sign language and co-speech gesture with (...)
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  9.  50
    Ernst Thoutenhoofd (2000). Philosophy's Real-World Consequences for Deaf People: Thoughts on Iconicity, Sign Language and Being Deaf. Human Studies 23 (3):261-279.
    The body of philosophical knowledge concerning the relations among language, the senses, and deafness, interpreted as a canon of key ideas which have found their way into folk metaphysics, constitutes one of the historically sustained conditions of the oppression of deaf people. Jonathan Rée, with his book I see a voice, makes the point that a philosophical history, grounded in a phenomenological and causal concern with philosophical thought and social life, can offer an archaeology of philosophy's contribution to the social (...)
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  10.  47
    Ludovic De Cuypere & Klaas Willems (2008). Meaning and Reference in Aristotle's Concept of the Linguistic Sign. Foundations of Science 13 (3-4):307-324.
    To Aristotle, spoken words are symbols, not of objects in the world, but of our mental experiences related to these objects. Presently there are two major strands of interpretation of Aristotle’s concept of the linguistic sign. First, there is the structuralist account offered by Coseriu (Geschichte der Sprachphilosophie. Von den Anfängen bis Rousseau, 2003 [1969], pp. 65–108) whose interpretation is reminiscent of the Saussurean sign concept. A second interpretation, offered by Lieb (in: Geckeler (Ed.) Logos Semantikos: Studia Linguistica (...)
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  11.  8
    Wan‐chi Wong (2015). The Role of Cultural Sign in Cultivating the Dialogical Self: The Case of The Ox‐Herding Pictures. Anthropology of Consciousness 26 (1):28-59.
    Based on a newly conceptualized notion of the dialogical self, achieved by integrating Bakhtin's philosophical anthropology and Karmiloff-Smith's Representational Redescription model into the existing notion proposed by Hermans and colleagues, the present study focuses on examining the role of The Ox-Herding Pictures in cultivating the dialogical self. Methodologically, this study adopted the cultural-historical perspective and microdevelopmental approach of Vygotsky. In-depth case studies consisting of six interrelated phases of interviews and written responses were conducted. The results show that such a unique (...)
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  12.  16
    Hannah Anglin-Jaffe (2013). Signs of Resistance: Peer Learning of Sign Languages Within 'Oral' Schools for the Deaf. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (3):261-271.
    This article explores the role of the Deaf child as peer educator. In schools where sign languages were banned, Deaf children became the educators of their Deaf peers in a number of contexts worldwide. This paper analyses how this peer education of sign language worked in context by drawing on two examples from boarding schools for the deaf in Nicaragua and Thailand. The argument is advanced that these practices constituted a child-led oppositional pedagogy. A connection is drawn to (...)
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  13.  8
    Carol Padden, So‐One Hwang, Ryan Lepic & Sharon Seegers (2015). Tools for Language: Patterned Iconicity in Sign Language Nouns and Verbs. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):81-94.
    When naming certain hand-held, man-made tools, American Sign Language signers exhibit either of two iconic strategies: a handling strategy, where the hands show holding or grasping an imagined object in action, or an instrument strategy, where the hands represent the shape or a dimension of the object in a typical action. The same strategies are also observed in the gestures of hearing nonsigners identifying pictures of the same set of tools. In this paper, we compare spontaneously created gestures from (...)
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  14.  9
    J. P. Morford, E. Wilkinson, A. Villwock, P. Piñar & J. F. Kroll (2011). When Deaf Signers Read English: Do Written Words Activate Their Sign Translations? Cognition 118 (2):286-292.
  15.  10
    Mats Bergman (2005). C. S. Peirce’s Dialogical Conception of Sign Processes. Studies in Philosophy and Education 24 (3-4):213-233.
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  16.  8
    K. W. Spence & R. Lippitt (1946). An Experimental Test of the Sign-Gestalt Theory of Trial and Error Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 36 (6):491.
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  17.  9
    Kalevi Kull (2002). A Sign is Not Alive — a Text Is. Sign Systems Studies 30 (1):327-335.
    The article deals with the relationships between the concepts of life process and sign process, arguing against the simplified equation of these concepts. Assuming that organism (and its particular case — cell) is the carrier of what is called ‘life’, we attempt to find a correspondent notion in semiotics that can be equalled to the feature of being alive. A candidate for this is the textual process as a multiple sign action. Considering that biological texts are generally non-linguistic, (...)
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  18.  17
    K. Cormier, A. Schembri, D. Vinson & E. Orfanidou (2012). First Language Acquisition Differs From Second Language Acquisition in Prelingually Deaf Signers: Evidence From Sensitivity to Grammaticality Judgement in British Sign Language. Cognition 124 (1):50-65.
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  19.  11
    Elina Vladimirova (2009). Sign Activity of Mammals as Means of Ecological Adaptation. Sign Systems Studies 37 (3-4):614-635.
    The present article discusses different basic semiotic-scientific postulates regarding mammals’ sign activity. On the one hand, there are arguments denying animals sign activity, according to which mammals are not capable of semantic generalization on the basis of conventional linguistic values. According to another approach, mammals’ sign activity can be considered as means of ecological adaptation, that is, the features of animal behaviour based on the information, received by them through their habitat characteristics without direct visual contacts with (...)
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  20.  8
    Elize Bisanz (2002). The Abstract Structure of the Aesthetic Sign. Sign Systems Studies 30 (2):707-721.
    Walter Benjamin foreshadowed many of the aesthetic theories, currently playing a fundamental role in the production and interpretation of art. By emphasising the role of the expressive character of art, or rather the category of expressivity itself, Benjamin defined art as a language. His aesthetics was characterised by the continuous interaction of two almost reciprocal projects: the theoretical critique of art which is based on an understanding of historical processes, and the understanding of historical processes which is formed by the (...)
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  21.  3
    John P. Seward & Nissim Levy (1949). Sign Learning as a Factor in Extinction. Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (5):660.
  22.  3
    Leigh Minturn (1954). A Test for Sign-Gestalt Expectancies Under Conditions of Negative Motivation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 48 (2):98.
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  23.  2
    H. F. Harlow & T. Spaet (1943). Problem Solution by Monkeys Following Bilateral Removal of the Prefrontal Areas. IV. Responses to Stimuli Having Multiple Sign Values. [REVIEW] Journal of Experimental Psychology 33 (6):500.
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  24.  2
    Kenneth W. Spence & Howard H. Kendler (1948). The Speculations of Leeper with Respect to the Iowa Tests of the Sign-Gestalt Theory of Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (1):106-109.
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  25.  2
    Remo Gramigna (2013). The Place of Language Among Sign Systems: Juri Lotman and Émile Benveniste. Sign Systems Studies 41 (2-3):339-354.
    This paper seeks to shed light on an unwritten chapter in the history of Tartu semiotics, that is, to draw a parallel between Juri Lotman and Emile Benvenisteon the status of natural language among other systems of signs. The tenet that language works as a ‘primary modelling system’ represents one of the trademarksof the Tartu-Moscow school. For Lotman, the primacy assigned to natural language in respect to other systems of signs lied in the fact that the former functions as a (...)
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  26.  3
    L. A. Petitto (1987). On the Autonomy of Language and Gesture: Evidence From the Acquisition of Personal Pronouns in American Sign Language. Cognition 27 (1):1-52.
    Two central assumptions of current models of language acquisition were addressed in this study: (1) knowledge of linguistic structure is "mapped onto" earlier forms of non-linguistic knowledge; and (2) acquiring a language involves a continuous learning sequence from early gestural communication to linguistic expression. The acquisition of the first and second person pronouns ME and YOU was investigated in a longitudinal study of two deaf children of deaf parents learning American Sign Language (ASL) as a first language. Personal pronouns (...)
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  27.  17
    Ans Kolk & Paolo Perego (2014). Sustainable Bonuses: Sign of Corporate Responsibility or Window Dressing? Journal of Business Ethics 119 (1):1-15.
    Despite a strong plea for integrating sustainability goals into traditional corporate bonus schemes, a comprehensive implementation of these systems has been lacking until recently. This article explores four illustrative cases from the Netherlands, where several multinationals started to pioneer with sustainable bonuses in the past few years. The article examines the setups and the different elements of bonus programmes used, in terms of performance criteria (focusing in particular on external vs. internal benchmarking), their link to specific stakeholders, type and size (...)
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  28. Anne Freadman (2004). The Machinery of Talk: Charles Peirce and the Sign Hypothesis. Stanford University Press.
    Freadman uses the term genre to access Peirce’s work, and expands this original theoretical approach by proposing that “genre” interacts with “sign” and that this interaction is central to the study of the semiotic in general.
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  29.  24
    Jacques Derrida (2011). Voice and Phenomenon: Introduction to the Problem of the Sign in Husserl's Phenomenology. Northwestern University Press.
    Translator's introduction: The germinal structure of Derrida's thought -- Translator's note -- Introduction -- Sign and signs -- The reduction of indication -- Meaning as soliloquy -- Meaning and representation -- The sign and the blink of an eye -- The voice that keeps silent -- The originative supplement.
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  30.  7
    Anton Sukhoverkhov (2010). Memory, Sign Systems, and Self-Reproductive Processes. Biological Theory 5 (2):161-166.
    This article presents a project of general theory of memory that embraces different types of memory: physical, biological, and social. The theory of memory presented here revises and unifies the general theory of sign systems and the theory of information, because memory processes in biological and social systems are informational processes that continuously construct and are constructed by sign systems. This article shows that memory cannot be reduced only to inherited information and material structures that “keep,” “represent,” or (...)
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  31. J. Budziszewski (2011). The Line Through the Heart: Natural Law as Fact, Theory, and Sign of Contradiction. Intercollegiate Studies Institute.
    Natural law as fact, theory, and sign of contradiction -- The second tablet project -- The mystery of what? -- The natural, the connatural, and the unnatural -- Accept no imitations: natural law vs. naturalism -- Thou shalt not kill . . . whom? the meaning of the person -- Capital punishment: the case for justice -- Constitution vs. constitutionalism -- Constitutional metaphysics -- The liberal, illiberal religion.
     
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  32.  9
    John Deely (2001). A Sign is What? A Dialogne Between a Semiotician and a Would-Be Realist. Sign Systems Studies 29 (2):705-743.
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  33.  63
    Roger Fouts & Erin McKenna (2011). Chimpanzees and Sign Language: Darwinian Realities Versus Cartesian Delusions. The Pluralist 6 (3):19-24.
    Dr. Fouts began his lecture with the story of how he and his wife Deborah became involved with Washoe—the first non-human to acquire the signs of American Sign Language (ASL). Project Washoe began in 1966 with Drs. Allen and Beatrix Gardner in Reno, Nevada. There had been other experiments that attempted to get chimpanzees to speak. These experiments were not successful due to anatomical and neurological differences between humans and chimpanzees. (Fouts showed some video of the chimpanzee Vicki trying (...)
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  34.  24
    Jörg Zeller (2006). Dynamic Sign Structures in Visual Art. Cultura 3 (2):33-41.
    It seems obvious that signs in visual art and musical notation are static carriers of visual and acoustic information. Both types of sign, however, represent dynamic processes. In real space-time, there exists no static visible thing or static audible sound. The sources of visible or audible information are dynamic – i.e. complementary substantialenergetic-informational – entities extending in space-time. The same is true of an artificial or organic receiver and processor of visual or audible information. Reality and semiosis – to (...)
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  35.  4
    Francesco Bellucci (2015). Exploring Peirce’s Speculative Grammar: The Immediate Object of a Sign. Sign Systems Studies 43 (4):399.
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  36.  21
    Joëlle Vlassis (2008). The Role of Mathematical Symbols in the Development of Number Conceptualization: The Case of the Minus Sign. Philosophical Psychology 21 (4):555 – 570.
    In mathematics education, students' difficulties with negative numbers are well known. To explain these difficulties, researchers traditionally refer to obstacles raised by the concept of NEGATIVE NUMBERS itself throughout its historical evolution. In order to improve our understanding, I propose to take into consideration another point of view, based on Vygotsky's principles, which define a strong relationship between signs such as language or symbols and cognitive development. I show how it is of great interest to consider students' difficulties with negatives (...)
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  37.  2
    Robin Paul Malloy (2009). Place, Space, and Time in the Sign of Property. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 22 (3):265-277.
    Property is a complex sign in semiotics. It is also the source of tension and conflict in law. This paper examines property in triadic terms consisting of what Charles S. Peirce would identify as the icon (firstness), the index (secondness), and the symbol (thirdness). From this perspective the paper explores the ideas of place, space, and time at the iconic level of the sign of property. Discussion addresses the way in which property serves as a coded system for (...)
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  38.  19
    Ditte Marie Munch‐Jurišić (2014). Perpetrator Abhorrence: Disgust as a Stop Sign. Metaphilosophy 45 (2):270-287.
    Most contemporary research on disgust can be divided into “disgust advocates” and “disgust skeptics.” The so-called advocates argue that disgust can have a positive influence on our moral judgment; skeptics warn that it can mislead us toward prejudice and discrimination. This article compares this disagreement to a structurally similar debate in the field of genocide studies concerning the phenomenon of “perpetrator abhorrence.” While some soldiers report having felt strong disgust in the moment of committing or witnessing atrocity, scholars disagree on (...)
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  39.  19
    Paul de Man (1982). Sign and Symbol in Hegel's "Aesthetics". Critical Inquiry 8 (4):761-775.
    We are far removed, in this section of the Encyclopedia on memory, from the mnemotechnic icons described by Francis Yates in The Art of Memory and much closer to Augustine's advice about how to remember and to psalmodize Scripture. Memory, for Hegel, is the learning by rote of names, or of words considered as names, and it can therefore not be separated from the notation, the inscription, or the writing down of these names. In order to remember, one is forced (...)
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  40.  2
    R. C. H. Tanner (2006). The Ordered Regiment of the Minus Sign: Off-Beat Mathematics in Harriot's Manuscripts. Annals of Science 37 (2):127-158.
    The manuscripts of Harriot discussed in this paper are essentially rough notes marginal to his systematic treatment of algebra, of which a small part was published posthumously. The central theme is the sign-rule for multiplication; but the incidentals open up an aspect of symbolism in mathematics entirely new for the time. A more restricted aspect of the same theme was touched on by Commandino in his Euclid, quoted by Harriot as rightly blaming ‘those that thinke that minus per minus (...)
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  41.  16
    Bencie Woll (2003). The Neural Representation of Spatial Predicate-Argument Structures in Sign Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):300-301.
    Evidence from studies of the processing of topographic and classifier constructions in sign language sentences provides a model of how a mental scene description can be represented linguistically, but it also raises questions about how this can be related to spatial linguistic descriptions in spoken languages and their processing. This in turn provides insights into models of the evolution of language.
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  42.  10
    Peter Bøgh Andersen & Berit Holmqvist (1989). Interactive Fiction: Artificial Intelligence as a Mode of Sign Production. AI and Society 4 (4):291-313.
    Interactive media need their own idioms that exploit the characteristics of the computer based sign. The fact that the reader can physically influence the course of events in the system changes the author's role, since he no longer creates a linear text but anarrative space that the reader can use to generate stories. Although stories are not simulations of the real world, they must still contain recognizable parts where everyday constraints of time and space hold. AI-techniques can be used (...)
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  43.  45
    Barbara Allen, Nancy Meyers, John Sullivan & Melissa Sullivan (2002). American Sign Language and End-of-Life Care: Research in the Deaf Community. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 14 (3):197-208.
    We describe how a Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) process was used to develop a means of discussing end-of-life care needs of Deaf seniors. This process identified a variety of communication issues to be addressed in working with this special population. We overview the unique linguistic and cultural characteristics of this community and their implications for working with Deaf individuals to provide information for making informed decisions about end-of-life care, including completion of health care directives. Our research and our work with (...)
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  44.  13
    Lesley Lancaster (2014). The Emergence of Symbolic Principles: The Distribution of Mind in Early Sign Making. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 7 (1):29-47.
    This paper considers the extent to which the earliest stages of learning about systems of inscription requires not just individual mental effort, but effort that is distributed across a wide physical and intellectual environment. It is particularly concerned with how children under the age of three learn about notational systems, including writing, and examines parallels with the evolution of written systems. It considers the position that children gain knowledge incrementally over the early months and years of life, supported by a (...)
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  45.  3
    Edna Andrews (2015). The Importance of Lotmanian Semiotics to Sign Theory and the Cognitive Neurosciences. Sign Systems Studies 43 (2/3):347.
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  46.  12
    Edith Wyschogrod (1999). The Death of the Sign, The Rise of the Image in Merce Cunningham's Choreography. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1999:219-229.
    It is not the purpose of the present paper to chronicle transformations in the recent history of dance but rather to demonstrate that an art in which the materiality of the body and the localizability of space are critical has nevertheless been engaged in a struggle between sign and image. This struggle cannot be understood without attending to the tensions between the visceral and the virtual, between site specific spatiality and cyberspace. Exploring changes in dance, an art not generally (...)
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  47.  15
    Angelo Loula & Joao Queiroz, Synthetic Semiotics: On Modelling and Simulating the Emergence of Sign Processes.
    Based on formal-theoretical principles about the sign processes involved, we have built synthetic experiments to investigate the emergence of communication based on symbols and indexes in a distributed system of sign users, following theoretical constraints from C.S.Peirce theory of signs, following a Synthetic Semiotics approach. In this paper, we summarize these computational experiments and results regarding associative learning processes of symbolic sign modality and cognitive conditions in an evolutionary process for the emergence of either symbol-based or index-based (...)
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  48.  17
    Rachele Malavasi, Kalevi Kull & Almo Farina (2014). The Acoustic Codes: How Animal Sign Processes Create Sound-Topes and Consortia Via Conflict Avoidance. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 7 (1):89-95.
    In this essay we argue for the possibility to describe the co-presence of species in a community as a consortium built by acoustic codes, using mainly the examples of bird choruses. In this particular case, the consortium is maintained via the sound-tope that different bird species create by singing in a chorus. More generally, the formation of acoustic codes as well as cohesive communicative systems (the consortia) can be seen as a result of plastic adaptational behaviour of the specimen who (...)
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  49.  2
    Helmut Pape (2015). C. S. Peirce on the Dynamic Object of a Sign: From Ontology to Semiotics and Back. Sign Systems Studies 43 (4):419.
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  50.  26
    Niall Lucy (2010). Structure, Sign and Play in the Discourse of Paul Auster's In the Country of Last Things. Angelaki 14 (2):21-28.
    (2009). Structure, Sign and Play in the Discourse of Paul Auster's In the Country of Last Things. Angelaki: Vol. 14, Ecopoetics and Pedagogies, pp. 21-28.
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