Search results for 'Silence' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Courtneys Campbell & Sounds Of Silence (forthcoming). Authoritative General Handbook of Instructions (Hereafter Instructions), These Initial Documents Addressed Such· Problems· as Abortion, Artificial. Bioethics Yearbook.score: 30.0
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  2. Brooke Alan Trisel (2012). God's Silence as an Epistemological Concern. Philosophical Forum 43 (4):383-393.score: 24.0
    Throughout history, many people, including Mother Teresa, have been troubled by God’s silence. In spite of the conflicting interpretations of the Bible, God has remained silent. What are the implications of divine hiddenness/silence for a meaning of life? Is there a good reason that explains God’s silence? If God created humanity to fulfill a purpose, then God would have clarified his purpose and our role by now, as I will argue. To help God carry out his purpose, (...)
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  3. Ian Phillips (forthcoming). Hallucinating Silence. In Dimitri Platchias & Fiona Macpherson (eds.), Hallucination. MIT Press.score: 24.0
    Tradition has it that, although we experience darkness, we can neither hear nor hallucinate silence. At most, we hear that it is silent, in virtue of lacking auditory experience. This cognitive view is at odds with our ordinary thought and talk. Yet it is not easy to vouchsafe the perception of silence: Sorensen‘s recent account entails the implausible claim that the permanently and profoundly deaf are perpetually hallucinating silence. To better defend the view that we can genuinely (...)
     
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  4. Stephen Palmquist, Silence as the Ultimate Fulfillment of the Philosophical Quest.score: 24.0
    The surprising comment Wittgenstein makes at the end of his Tractatus suggests that, even though the analysis of words is the proper method of doing philosophy, philosophy’s ultimate aim may be to experience silence. Whereas Wittgenstein never explains what he meant by his cryptic conclusion, Kant provides numerous clues as to how the same position can be understood in a more complete and systematic way. Distinguishing between the meanings of “silence,” “noise” and “sound” provides a helpful way of (...)
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  5. Peter Verhezen (2010). Giving Voice in a Culture of Silence. From a Culture of Compliance to a Culture of Integrity. Journal of Business Ethics 96 (2):187 - 206.score: 24.0
    This article argues that attempting to overcome moral silence in organizations will require management to move beyond a compliance-oriented organizational culture toward a culture based on integrity. Such cultural change is part of good corporate governance that aims to steer an organization to enhance creativity and moral excellence, and thus organizational value. Governance mechanisms can be either formal or informal. Formal codes and other internal formal regulations that emphasize compliance are necessary, although informal mechanisms that are based on relationship-building (...)
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  6. Gary R. Rothwell & J. Norman Baldwin (2007). Ethical Climate Theory, Whistle-Blowing, and the Code of Silence in Police Agencies in the State of Georgia. Journal of Business Ethics 70 (4):341 - 361.score: 24.0
    This article reports the findings from a study that investigates the relationship between ethical climates and police whistle-blowing on five forms of misconduct in the State of Georgia. The results indicate that a friendship or team climate generally explains willingness to blow the whistle, but not the actual frequency of blowing the whistle. Instead, supervisory status, a control variable investigated in previous studies, is the most consistent predictor of both willingness to blow the whistle and frequency of blowing the whistle. (...)
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  7. Chien-Hsing Ho (2012). The Nonduality of Speech and Silence: A Comparative Analysis of Jizang’s Thought on Language and Beyond. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):1-19.score: 24.0
    Jizang (549−623 CE), the key philosophical exponent of the Sanlun tradition of Chinese Buddhism, based his philosophy considerably on his reading of the works of Nāgārjuna (c.150−250 CE), the founder of the Indian Madhyamaka school. However, although Jizang sought to follow Nāgārjuna closely, there are salient features in his thought on language that are notably absent from Nāgārjuna’s works. In this paper, I present a philosophical analysis of Jizang’s views of the relationship between speech and silence and compare them (...)
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  8. Timothy McGrew (2014). The Argument From Silence. Acta Analytica 29 (2):215-228.score: 24.0
    The argument from silence is a pattern of reasoning in which the failure of a known source to mention a particular fact or event is used as the ground of an inference, usually to the conclusion that the supposed fact is untrue or the supposed event did not actually happen. Such arguments are widely used in historical work, but they are also widely contested. This paper surveys some inadequate attempts to model this sort of argument, offers a new analysis (...)
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  9. Michael Gary Duncan (2012). The Curious Silence of the Dog and Paul of Tarsus; Revisiting The Argument From Silence. Informal Logic 32 (1):83-97.score: 24.0
    In this essay I propose an interpretative and explanatory structure for the so-called argumentum ex silento, or argument from silence (henceforth referred to as the AFS). To this end, I explore two examples, namely, Sherlock Holmes’s oft-quoted notice of the “curious incident of the dog in the night-time” from Arthur Conan Doyle’s short story “Silver Blaze,” and the historical question of Paul of Tarsus’s silence on biographical details of the historical Jesus. Through these cases, I conclude that the (...)
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  10. Michael Knoll & Rolf Dick (2013). Do I Hear the Whistle…? A First Attempt to Measure Four Forms of Employee Silence and Their Correlates. Journal of Business Ethics 113 (2):349-362.score: 24.0
    Silence in organizations refers to a state in which employees refrain from calling attention to issues at work such as illegal or immoral practices or developments that violate personal, moral, or legal standards. While Morrison and Milliken (Acad Manag Rev 25:706–725, 2000) discussed how organizational silence as a top-down organizational level phenomenon can cause employees to remain silent, a bottom-up perspective—that is, how employee motives contribute to the occurrence and maintenance of silence in organizations—has not yet been (...)
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  11. Sandra Braman (2007). When Nightingales Break the Law: Silence and the Construction of Reality. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 9 (4):281-295.score: 24.0
    Strikingly, theorizing about digital technologies has led us to recognize many habitual subjects of research as figures against fields that are also worthy of study. Communication, for example, becomes visible only against the field of silence. Silence is critically important for the construction of reality – and the social construction of reality has a complement, the also necessary contemplative construction of reality. Silence is so sensitive and fragile that an inability to achieve it, or to get rid (...)
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  12. Roderick MacIver & Ann O'Shaughnessy (eds.) (2006/2009). Meditations on Nature, Meditations on Silence. North Atlantic Books.score: 24.0
    "Drawing on art, poetry, interviews, and book excerpts, Meditations on nature, meditations on silence explores the beauty and mystery of the natural world and ...
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  13. William De Maria (2006). Brother Secret, Sister Silence: Sibling Conspiracies Against Managerial Integrity. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 65 (3):219-234.score: 24.0
    I offer a new cartography of ethical resistance. I argue that there is an uncharted interaction between managerial secrecy and organizational silence, which may exponentially increase the incidence of corruption in ways not yet understood. Current methods used to raise levels of moral conduct in business and government practice appear blind to this powerful duo. Extensive literature reviews of secrecy and silence scholarships form the background for an early stage conceptual layout of the co-production of secrecy and (...). (shrink)
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  14. Michael Knoll & Rolf van Dick (2013). Do I Hear the Whistle…? A First Attempt to Measure Four Forms of Employee Silence and Their Correlates. Journal of Business Ethics 113 (2):349-362.score: 24.0
    Silence in organizations refers to a state in which employees refrain from calling attention to issues at work such as illegal or immoral practices or developments that violate personal, moral, or legal standards. While Morrison and Milliken (Acad Manag Rev 25:706–725, 2000) discussed how organizational silence as a top-down organizational level phenomenon can cause employees to remain silent, a bottom-up perspective—that is, how employee motives contribute to the occurrence and maintenance of silence in organizations—has not yet been (...)
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  15. Richard Ennals (2007). The Meaning of Silence. AI and Society 21 (4):625-632.score: 24.0
    Silence resides in the gaps between the known islands of explicit knowledge. Rather than expecting to build systems with complete information, we take a human-centred approach. Individual citizens need to be active, engage in dialogue and be aware of the importance of tacit knowledge. As societies, we recognise the incompleteness and inconsistency of our discourse.
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  16. Dennis Kurzon (2011). Moment of Silence. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (2):195-209.score: 24.0
    The paper looks at the establishment of religion clause in the First Amendment to the US Constitution, and cases, e.g. Brown v. Gilmore, followed by Croft v. Perry and Sherman v. Koch, cases that relate to the concept of the “moment of silence” in educational institutions in which it was claimed that such events constitute a breach of the establishment clause. Courts have been inconsistent in their decision-making, which may indicate a lack of transparency not only in the interpretation (...)
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  17. Jerker Rönnberg Shahram Moradi, Björn Lidestam (2013). Gated Audiovisual Speech Identification in Silence Vs. Noise: Effects on Time and Accuracy. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    This study investigated the degree to which audiovisual presentation (compared to auditory-only presentation) affected isolation point (IPs, the amount of time required for the correct identification of speech stimuli using a gating paradigm) in silence and noise conditions. The study expanded on the findings of Moradi et al. (under revision), using the same stimuli, but presented in an audiovisual instead of an auditory-only manner. The results showed that noise impeded the identification of consonants and words (i.e., delayed IPs and (...)
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  18. David B. Whiteside & Laurie J. Barclay (2013). Echoes of Silence: Employee Silence as a Mediator Between Overall Justice and Employee Outcomes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):251-266.score: 24.0
    Despite burgeoning interest in employee silence, there are still significant gaps in our understanding of (a) the antecedents of employee silence in organizations and (b) the implications of engaging in silence for employees. Using two experimental studies (Study 1a, N = 91; Study 1b, N = 152) and a field survey of full-time working adults (Study 2, N = 308), we examined overall justice as an antecedent of acquiescent (i.e., silence motivated by futility) and quiescent (...) (i.e., silence motivated by fear of sanctions). Across the studies, results indicated that overall justice is a significant predictor of both types of silence in organizations. Furthermore, Study 2 indicated that the implications of silence extend beyond the restriction of information flow in organizations to include employee outcomes. Specifically, acquiescent silence partially or fully mediated the relationship between overall justice perceptions and emotional exhaustion, psychological withdrawal, physical withdrawal, and performance. Quiescent silence partially mediated these relationships, with the exception of performance. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings for both the justice and silence literatures are discussed. (shrink)
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  19. Richard Fleming (2009). Evil and Silence. Paradigm Publishers.score: 24.0
    First book: Just plain evil -- You cannot meaningfully talk this way : violence is a virtue-so you cannot justifiably act that way -- Second book: Ordinary silence -- Affirming the limits of our words : listening attentively makes a life worth living -- Supplements to first and second books -- The difficulty is to stop.
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  20. Susan Leigh Star & Geoffrey C. Bowker (2007). Enacting Silence: Residual Categories as a Challenge for Ethics, Information Systems, and Communication. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 9 (4):273-280.score: 22.0
    Residual categories are those which cannot be formally represented within a given classification system. We examine the forms that residuality takes within our information systems today, and explore some silences which form around those inhabiting particular residual categories. We argue that there is significant ethical and political work to be done in exploring residuality.
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  21. Sylvie Steinberg (2010). Quand le silence se fait : bribes de paroles de femmes sur la sexualité au xviie siècle. Clio 1:79-110.score: 22.0
    Les historiens qui se sont intéressés à la sexualité au xviie siècle ont souvent noté qu’il était rare d’accéder à une parole féminine. Quelques bribes en subsistent pourtant, que délivrent les biographies et autobiographies spirituelles de femmes dévotes et les archives des tribunaux d’Église (Officialités). À partir de cette parole enchâssée dans d’autres discours – ceux des hommes et femmes d’Église qui les recueillent, ceux des juges qui les enregistrent –, opacifiée par des visées particulières – hagiographique ou judiciaire –, (...)
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  22. Mark S. Muldoon (1996). Silence Revisited: Taking the Sight Out of Auditory Qualities. Review of Metaphysics 50 (2):275-298.score: 21.0
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  23. Angela Thachuk (2007). The Space in Between: Narratives of Silence and Genetic Terminations. Bioethics 21 (9):511–514.score: 21.0
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  24. Gordana Djeric (2007). Things Talked About While We Remain Silence and Things We're Silence About While Talking: The Starting Assumptions for an Anthropology of Silence About the Nearest Past. Filozofija I Društvo 18 (3):43-57.score: 21.0
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  25. Alice Borchard Greene (1940). The Philosophy of Silence. New York, R.R. Smith.score: 21.0
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  26. Guy Petitdemandge (2009). Logos, cri, silence. Archives de Philosophie 4:645-659.score: 21.0
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  27. Alex Davies (2014). How to Silence Content with Porn, Context and Loaded Questions. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):n/a-n/a.score: 20.0
    Catharine MacKinnon claimed that pornography silence's women's speech where this speech is protected by free speech legislation. MacKinnon's claim was attacked as confused because, so it seemed, pornography is not the kind of thing that can silence speech. Using ideas drawn from John Austin's account of speech acts, Rae Langton defended MacKinnon's claim against this attack by showing how speech can, in principle, be silenced by pornography. However, Langton's defence requires us to deviate from a widely held understanding (...)
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  28. Sounds Of Silence (1991). Courtney S. Campbell. Theological Developments in Bioethics, 1988-1990 1:23.score: 20.0
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  29. J. R. G. Williams (2012). Indeterminacy and Normative Silence. Analysis 72 (2):217-225.score: 18.0
    This paper examines two puzzles of indeterminacy. The first puzzle concerns the hypothesis that there is a unified phenomenon of indeterminacy. How are we to reconcile this with the apparent diversity of reactions that indeterminacy prompts? The second puzzle focuses narrowly on borderline cases of vague predicates. How are we to account for the lack of theoretical consensus about what the proper reaction to borderline cases is? I suggest (building on work by Maudlin) that the characteristic feature of indeterminacy is (...)
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  30. Michael Lynch (1999). Silence in Context: Ethnomethodology and Social Theory. [REVIEW] Human Studies 22 (2-4):211-233.score: 18.0
    Ethnomethodologists (or at least many of them) have been reticent about their theoretical sources and methodological principles. It frequently falls to others to make such matters explicit. In this paper I discuss this silence about theory, but rather than entering the breach by specifying a set of implicit assumptions and principles, I suggest that the reticence is consistent with ethnomethodology's distinctive research 'program'. The main part of the paper describes the pedagogical exercises and forms of apprenticeship through which Garfinkel (...)
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  31. Bernard P. Dauenhauer (1976). Silence : An Intentional Analysis. Research in Phenomenology 6 (1):63-83.score: 18.0
    To clarify the sense of the complex positive phenomenon of silence, i engage in an intentional analysis of its occurrences. in making this analysis i use a method derived basically from husserl. through this method i establish that silence is 1) an active intentional performance necessary for the clarification of the sense of intersubjectivity, 2) an intentional performance which does not intend fully determinate objects, 3) that which interrupts the "and so forth" of a stream of performances which (...)
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  32. Ian Phillips (2014). Breaking the Silence: Motion Silencing and Experience of Change. Philosophical Studies 168 (3):693-707.score: 18.0
    The naïve view of temporal experience (Phillips, in: Lloyd D, Arstila V (eds) Subjective time: the philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience of temporality, forthcoming-a) comprises two claims. First, that we are perceptually aware of temporal properties, such as succession and change. Second, that for any temporal property apparently presented in experience, our experience itself possesses that temporal property. In his paper ‘Silencing the experience of change’ (forthcoming), Watzl argues that this second naïve inheritance thesis faces a novel counter-example in the form (...)
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  33. Iain Thomson, The Silence of the Limbs: Critiquing Culture From a Heideggerian Understanding of the Work of Art.score: 18.0
    In 1991 Jonathan Demme's The Silence of the Lambs made off with five Academy Awards, including the coveted "Best Picture." Merely to introduce this fact I have already had to ignore several potentially relevant questions. [1] But I will spare you the tedium of endlessly qualifying my choice of subject matter; both existentialism and psychoanalysis teach us that the attempt to get behind our own starting points or render our pasts completely transparent to ourselves is an impossible task. Rather, (...)
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  34. David Lewin (2014). Behold: Silence and Attention in Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (3):355-369.score: 18.0
    Educators continually ask about the best means to engage students and how best to capture attention. These concerns often make the problematic assumption that students can directly govern their own attention. In order to address the role and limits of attention in education, some theorists have sought to recover the significance of silence or mindfulness in schools, but I argue that these approaches are too simplistic. A more fundamental examination of our conceptions of identity and agency reveals a Cartesian (...)
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  35. John Kleinig (2001). The Blue Wall of Silence. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (1):1-23.score: 18.0
    The “blue wall of silence” -- the rule that police officers will not testify against each other -- has its roots in an important associational virtue, loyalty, which, in the context of friendship and familial relations, is of central importance. This article seeks to distinguish the worthy roots of the “blue wall” from its frequent corruption in the covering up of serious criminality, and attempts to offer criteria for determining when to testify and when to respond in other ways (...)
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  36. Christopher Manes (1992). Nature and Silence. Environmental Ethics 14 (4):339-350.score: 18.0
    A viable environmental ethics must confront “the silence of nature”—the fact that in our culture only humans have status as speaking subjects. Deep ecology has attempted to do so by challenging the idiom of humanism that has silenced the natural world. This approach has been criticized by those who wish to rescue the discourse of reason in environmental ethics. I give a genealogy of nature’s silence to show how various motifs of medieval and Renaissance origins have worked together (...)
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  37. José Medina (2004). The Meanings of Silence: Wittgensteinian Contextualism and Polyphony. Inquiry 47 (6):562 – 579.score: 18.0
    Radical feminists have argued that there are normative exclusions that have silenced certain voices and have rendered certain meanings unintelligible. Some Wittgensteinians (including some Wittgensteinian feminists) have argued that these radical feminists fall into a philosophical illusion by appealing to the notions of 'intelligible nonsense' and 'inexpressible meanings', an illusion that calls for philosophical therapy. In this paper I diagnose and criticize the therapeutic dilemma that results from this interpretation of Wittgenstein's contextualism. According to this dilemma, if something is meaningful, (...)
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  38. Michelle Boulous Walker (1998). Philosophy and the Maternal Body: Reading Silence. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Philosophy and the Maternal Body is a fascinating exploration of an overlooked aspect of feminist thought: what is the role of maternity in philosophy and in what ways has it been used by male theorists to effectively "silence" the voices of women in philosophy? Drawing on rich examples such as Plato's allegory of the cave, Sigmund Freud and Melanie Klein's writing on the mother and the mother-daughter relationship, and the psychoanalytic and feminist insights of Irigaray and Kristeva, Michelle Boulous (...)
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  39. Tony Lynch (2001). Temperance, Temptation, and Silence. Philosophy 76 (2):251-269.score: 18.0
    Often a concern for truthfulness becomes the celebration of radical truthfulness, where this involves both the utter refusal of deception and that all moral and political beliefs be fit to survive publicity. An unfortunate consequence of this is that it has blinded us to a fair and accurate understanding of the nature and role of an important technique of virtue—temperance. Temperance implies a strategy of renunciation and withdrawal from the full content of our psychological lives. It involves us in pursuing (...)
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  40. Youru Wang (2001). Liberating Oneself From the Absolutized Boundary of Language: A Liminological Approach to the Interplay of Speech and Silence in Chan Buddhism. Philosophy East and West 51 (1):83-99.score: 18.0
    An approach that allows us to see more clearly what Chan Buddhists mean by the inadequacy of language is based on three principles of liminology of language: (1) the radical problematization of any absolute, immobilized limit of language; (2) insight into the mutual connection and transition between two sides of language--speaking and non-speaking; and (3) linguistic twisting as the strategy of play at the limit of language. It helps us to rediscover how Chan masters perceived a dynamic, mutually involving relation (...)
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  41. Angelo Caranfa (2011). The Luminous Darkness of Silence in the Poetics of Simone Weil and Georges Rouault. Philosophy and Theology 23 (1):53-72.score: 18.0
    This essay tries to demonstrate two distinct but complementary visions to a central theme of Christian faith: humanity’s redemption in the crucified Christ. It will attempt to show how the poetics of Simone Weil (1909–1943) and the poetic art of Georges Rouault (1871–1943) embody different understandings of Christian faith. Considering faith from a philosophical approach, Weil detaches the sufferings of Christ from the totality of salvific history. Viewing faith from the artistic approach, Rouault places the crucified Christ in the context (...)
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  42. Krzysztof Ziarek (2010). Noting Silence. Critical Horizons 11 (3):359-377.score: 18.0
    In coming to words, language “reserves” itself: it holds back its event, keeping it illegible and silent. It is possible to see much of modern innovative or “experimental” poetry as such an experience of reticence and stillness, an experiment of language listening to itself “speaking” in order to allow the force of the illegible to come to speech. How this silence both limits what can be said and holds what has been written open to the possibilities of saying otherwise (...)
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  43. Sandra Haarsager (1991). Choosing Silence: A Case of Reverse Agenda Setting in Depression Era News Coverage. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 6 (1):35 – 46.score: 18.0
    The power to influence decisions is inherent in newspaper practices of publishing or withholding information about significant events - creating profound ethical questions. The two major newspapers in Seattle provide an example of selective coverage of the Great Depression. Area unemployment that reached 25% and galloping bank failures were ignored, as were social implications of such events. Questions are raised here about the moral implications of strategic silence, or reverse agenda setting, as a means of encouraging broadened discussion of (...)
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  44. King-Pong Chiu 趙敬邦 (2010). Kwan, Tze-Wan 關子尹, Articulation-Cum-Silence: In Search of a Philosophy of Orientation 語默無常: 尋找定向中的哲學反思. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (3):363-365.score: 18.0
    Kwan, Tze-wan 關子尹, Articulation-cum-Silence: In Search of a Philosophy of Orientation 語默無常: 尋找定向中的哲學反思 Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11712-010-9180-3 Authors King-pong Chiu 趙敬邦, Department of Religions and Theology, University of Manchester, Opal Hall G.B13, Cavendish Street, Manchest, M15 6BB UK Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009 Journal Volume Volume 9 Journal Issue Volume 9, Number 3.
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  45. F. Gray (2001). Philosophy and the Maternal Body: Reading Silence. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (2):306 – 307.score: 18.0
    Book Information Philosophy and the Maternal Body: Reading Silence. By Michelle Boulous Walker. Routledge. London and New York. 1998. Pp. x + 235.
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  46. John J. Conley (1994). The Silence of Descartes. Philosophy and Theology 8 (3):199-212.score: 18.0
    Certain passages in the Meditations indicate a silence of Descartes before the mystery of God. These passages underscore the inadequacy of reason to penetrate God’s attributes. Descartes underlines the incomprehensibility of God’s infinity and God’s purposes. He evokes an intuitive knowledge of God which transcends the conceptual. Relevant passages in the correspondence of Descartes indicate Descartes’s repeated concern with the limits of philosophical theology and support a deconstruction of the Medítations which privileges its recurrent theologia negativa. Such an interpretation (...)
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  47. Berel Lang (1996). Heidegger's Silence. Cornell University Press.score: 18.0
    UP. Berel Lang shows in this penetrating book how Heideggeer's own silence on the 'Jewish Question' --how (or if) the Jews were to live among the nations- ...
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  48. Tista Bagchi (2006). Morally Right Action Under Silence and Disempowerment. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 9:161-166.score: 18.0
    This paper seeks to address the relationship between two key areas of contention figuring in the communicative realities in which language is used and the morality of action: the role of silence and the role of power and the lack thereof. It is proposed that action per se becomes problematic under practical manifestations of silence such as inarticulacy (which is aggravated by major asymmetries in the global politics of language) and ignorance, and that even when action is possible, (...)
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  49. Hayden Teo & Donella Caspersz (2011). Dissenting Discourse: Exploring Alternatives to the Whistleblowing/Silence Dichotomy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 104 (2):237-249.score: 18.0
    In recent times, whistleblowing has become one of the most popularly debated issues of business ethics. Popular discussion has coincided with the institutionalisation of whistleblowing via legal and administrative practices, supported by the emergence of academic research in the field. However, the public practice and knowledge that has subsequently developed appears to construct a dichotomy of whistleblowing/silence ; that is, an employee elects either to ‘blow the whistle’ on organisational wrongdoing, or remain silent. We argue that this public transcript (...)
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  50. John Trinkaus & Joseph Giacalone (2005). The Silence of the Stakeholders: Zero Decibel Level at Enron. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):237 - 248.score: 18.0
    While the demise of Enron has raised a number of interesting issues, such as proper governance of large corporations, and the effectiveness and efficiency of statutory direction and regulatory mechanisms, the lack of meaningful vocal stakeholder stewardship has not been one of them. While the relative “silence” of Enron’s stakeholders (watchdogs) could simply have been a communication glitch, or a temporary lapse in social morality, an understanding of hat was not said and why, could well be a significant requisite (...)
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