Search results for 'Silence' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  2
    Courtneys Campbell & Sounds Of Silence (forthcoming). Authoritative General Handbook of Instructions (Hereafter Instructions), These Initial Documents Addressed Such· Problems· as Abortion, Artificial. Bioethics Yearbook.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Brooke Alan Trisel (2012). God's Silence as an Epistemological Concern. Philosophical Forum 43 (4):383-393.
    Throughout history, many people, including Mother Teresa, have been troubled by God’s silence. In spite of the conflicting interpretations of the Bible, God has remained silent. What are the implications of divine hiddenness/silence for a meaning of life? Is there a good reason that explains God’s silence? If God created humanity to fulfill a purpose, then God would have clarified his purpose and our role by now, as I will argue. To help God carry out his purpose, (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  38
    Gary R. Rothwell & J. Norman Baldwin (2007). Ethical Climate Theory, Whistle-Blowing, and the Code of Silence in Police Agencies in the State of Georgia. Journal of Business Ethics 70 (4):341 - 361.
    This article reports the findings from a study that investigates the relationship between ethical climates and police whistle-blowing on five forms of misconduct in the State of Georgia. The results indicate that a friendship or team climate generally explains willingness to blow the whistle, but not the actual frequency of blowing the whistle. Instead, supervisory status, a control variable investigated in previous studies, is the most consistent predictor of both willingness to blow the whistle and frequency of blowing the whistle. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  4.  64
    Peter Verhezen (2010). Giving Voice in a Culture of Silence. From a Culture of Compliance to a Culture of Integrity. Journal of Business Ethics 96 (2):187 - 206.
    This article argues that attempting to overcome moral silence in organizations will require management to move beyond a compliance-oriented organizational culture toward a culture based on integrity. Such cultural change is part of good corporate governance that aims to steer an organization to enhance creativity and moral excellence, and thus organizational value. Governance mechanisms can be either formal or informal. Formal codes and other internal formal regulations that emphasize compliance are necessary, although informal mechanisms that are based on relationship-building (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  5.  34
    Timothy McGrew (2014). The Argument From Silence. Acta Analytica 29 (2):215-228.
    The argument from silence is a pattern of reasoning in which the failure of a known source to mention a particular fact or event is used as the ground of an inference, usually to the conclusion that the supposed fact is untrue or the supposed event did not actually happen. Such arguments are widely used in historical work, but they are also widely contested. This paper surveys some inadequate attempts to model this sort of argument, offers a new analysis (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6.  3
    Rafe McGregor (2016). The Silence of the Night: Collaboration, Deceit, and Remorselessness. Orbis Litterarum 71 (2):163-184.
    Towards the end of the twentieth century, the issue of collaboration with the Third Reich became particularly problematic for deconstructive criticism. The distinction between collaboration and cooperation is often far from clear, however, and in borderline cases the opacity of the motives behind the alleged collaboration may be such that retrospective historical judgements run the risk of appearing arbitrary. In contrast, the decision to remain silent about alleged collaboration can – and should – invite negative moral judgement. On the one (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  10
    Michael Knoll & Rolf van Dick (2013). Do I Hear the Whistle…? A First Attempt to Measure Four Forms of Employee Silence and Their Correlates. Journal of Business Ethics 113 (2):349-362.
    Silence in organizations refers to a state in which employees refrain from calling attention to issues at work such as illegal or immoral practices or developments that violate personal, moral, or legal standards. While Morrison and Milliken (Acad Manag Rev 25:706–725, 2000) discussed how organizational silence as a top-down organizational level phenomenon can cause employees to remain silent, a bottom-up perspective—that is, how employee motives contribute to the occurrence and maintenance of silence in organizations—has not yet been (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  16
    Michael Knoll & Rolf Dick (2013). Do I Hear the Whistle…? A First Attempt to Measure Four Forms of Employee Silence and Their Correlates. Journal of Business Ethics 113 (2):349-362.
    Silence in organizations refers to a state in which employees refrain from calling attention to issues at work such as illegal or immoral practices or developments that violate personal, moral, or legal standards. While Morrison and Milliken (Acad Manag Rev 25:706–725, 2000) discussed how organizational silence as a top-down organizational level phenomenon can cause employees to remain silent, a bottom-up perspective—that is, how employee motives contribute to the occurrence and maintenance of silence in organizations—has not yet been (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9.  14
    William De Maria (2006). Brother Secret, Sister Silence: Sibling Conspiracies Against Managerial Integrity. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 65 (3):219-234.
    I offer a new cartography of ethical resistance. I argue that there is an uncharted interaction between managerial secrecy and organizational silence, which may exponentially increase the incidence of corruption in ways not yet understood. Current methods used to raise levels of moral conduct in business and government practice appear blind to this powerful duo. Extensive literature reviews of secrecy and silence scholarships form the background for an early stage conceptual layout of the co-production of secrecy and (...). (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  10.  92
    Stephen Palmquist, Silence as the Ultimate Fulfillment of the Philosophical Quest.
    The surprising comment Wittgenstein makes at the end of his Tractatus suggests that, even though the analysis of words is the proper method of doing philosophy, philosophy’s ultimate aim may be to experience silence. Whereas Wittgenstein never explains what he meant by his cryptic conclusion, Kant provides numerous clues as to how the same position can be understood in a more complete and systematic way. Distinguishing between the meanings of “silence,” “noise” and “sound” provides a helpful way of (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Ian Phillips (forthcoming). Hallucinating Silence. In Dimitri Platchias & Fiona Macpherson (eds.), Hallucination. MIT Press
    Tradition has it that, although we experience darkness, we can neither hear nor hallucinate silence. At most, we hear that it is silent, in virtue of lacking auditory experience. This cognitive view is at odds with our ordinary thought and talk. Yet it is not easy to vouchsafe the perception of silence: Sorensen‘s recent account entails the implausible claim that the permanently and profoundly deaf are perpetually hallucinating silence. To better defend the view that we can genuinely (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  29
    Chien-Hsing Ho (2012). The Nonduality of Speech and Silence: A Comparative Analysis of Jizang’s Thought on Language and Beyond. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):1-19.
    Jizang (549−623 CE), the key philosophical exponent of the Sanlun tradition of Chinese Buddhism, based his philosophy considerably on his reading of the works of Nāgārjuna (c.150−250 CE), the founder of the Indian Madhyamaka school. However, although Jizang sought to follow Nāgārjuna closely, there are salient features in his thought on language that are notably absent from Nāgārjuna’s works. In this paper, I present a philosophical analysis of Jizang’s views of the relationship between speech and silence and compare them (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  16
    Michael Gary Duncan (2012). The Curious Silence of the Dog and Paul of Tarsus; Revisiting The Argument From Silence. Informal Logic 32 (1):83-97.
    In this essay I propose an interpretative and explanatory structure for the so-called argumentum ex silento, or argument from silence (henceforth referred to as the AFS). To this end, I explore two examples, namely, Sherlock Holmes’s oft-quoted notice of the “curious incident of the dog in the night-time” from Arthur Conan Doyle’s short story “Silver Blaze,” and the historical question of Paul of Tarsus’s silence on biographical details of the historical Jesus. Through these cases, I conclude that the (...)
    Direct download (16 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  3
    Gordana Djeric (2007). Things Talked About While We Remain Silence and Things We ’Re Silence About While Talking: The Starting Assumptions for an Anthropology of Silence About the Nearest Past‘. Filozofija I Društvo 18 (3):43-57.
    Wars of the last decade of the 20th century in former Yugoslavia have brought the whole region into the center of media attention and, accordingly, have aroused interest of the western academic theory. Since the latest ′discovery of the Balkans′ was brought into being precisely due to wars, one shouldn’t be surprised to find that many academic approaches to questions of Yugoslavia dismemberment are biased, superficial or exotic. On the other hand, Serbian academic auditorium was far from being active in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  3
    David B. Whiteside & Laurie J. Barclay (2013). Echoes of Silence: Employee Silence as a Mediator Between Overall Justice and Employee Outcomes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):251-266.
    Despite burgeoning interest in employee silence, there are still significant gaps in our understanding of (a) the antecedents of employee silence in organizations and (b) the implications of engaging in silence for employees. Using two experimental studies (Study 1a, N = 91; Study 1b, N = 152) and a field survey of full-time working adults (Study 2, N = 308), we examined overall justice as an antecedent of acquiescent (i.e., silence motivated by futility) and quiescent (...) (i.e., silence motivated by fear of sanctions). Across the studies, results indicated that overall justice is a significant predictor of both types of silence in organizations. Furthermore, Study 2 indicated that the implications of silence extend beyond the restriction of information flow in organizations to include employee outcomes. Specifically, acquiescent silence partially or fully mediated the relationship between overall justice perceptions and emotional exhaustion, psychological withdrawal, physical withdrawal, and performance. Quiescent silence partially mediated these relationships, with the exception of performance. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings for both the justice and silence literatures are discussed. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  7
    Richard Ennals (2007). The Meaning of Silence. AI and Society 21 (4):625-632.
    Silence resides in the gaps between the known islands of explicit knowledge. Rather than expecting to build systems with complete information, we take a human-centred approach. Individual citizens need to be active, engage in dialogue and be aware of the importance of tacit knowledge. As societies, we recognise the incompleteness and inconsistency of our discourse.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  1
    Dennis Kurzon (2011). Moment of Silence. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (2):195-209.
    The paper looks at the establishment of religion clause in the First Amendment to the US Constitution, and cases, e.g. Brown v. Gilmore, followed by Croft v. Perry and Sherman v. Koch, cases that relate to the concept of the “moment of silence” in educational institutions in which it was claimed that such events constitute a breach of the establishment clause. Courts have been inconsistent in their decision-making, which may indicate a lack of transparency not only in the interpretation (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Richard Fleming (2009). Evil and Silence. Paradigm Publishers.
    First book: Just plain evil -- You cannot meaningfully talk this way : violence is a virtue-so you cannot justifiably act that way -- Second book: Ordinary silence -- Affirming the limits of our words : listening attentively makes a life worth living -- Supplements to first and second books -- The difficulty is to stop.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  1
    Karmen MacKendrick (2001). Immemorial Silence. State University of New York Press.
    Treats time, eternity, language, and silence in an original way.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  9
    Roderick MacIver & Ann O'Shaughnessy (eds.) (2006/2009). Meditations on Nature, Meditations on Silence. North Atlantic Books.
    "Drawing on art, poetry, interviews, and book excerpts, Meditations on nature, meditations on silence explores the beauty and mystery of the natural world and ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. James M. Rhodes (2003). Eros, Wisdom, and Silence: Plato's Erotic Dialogues. University of Missouri.
    _Eros, Wisdom, and Silence_ is a close reading of Plato’s Seventh Letter and his dialogues _Symposium_ and _Phaedrus_, with significant attention also given to _Alcibiades I_. A book about love, James Rhodes’s work was conceived as a conversation and meant to be read side by side with Plato’s works and those of his worthy interlocutors. It invites lovers to participate in conversations that move their souls to love, and it also invites the reader to take part in the author’s (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Ana Cristina Zimmermann & W. John Morgan (forthcoming). A Time for Silence? Its Possibilities for Dialogue and for Reflective Learning. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-15.
    From the beginning of history sounds have played a fundamentally important role in humanity’s development as ways of expression and of communication. However in contemporary western society, and indeed globally, we are experiencing an excess of speech and a relentless encouragement to expression. Such excess indicates a misunderstanding about what expression and dialogue should be. This condition encourages us to think about silence, solitude and contemplation and the role they might play in restoring the realm of personal understanding of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  27
    Susan Leigh Star & Geoffrey C. Bowker (2007). Enacting Silence: Residual Categories as a Challenge for Ethics, Information Systems, and Communication. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 9 (4):273-280.
    Residual categories are those which cannot be formally represented within a given classification system. We examine the forms that residuality takes within our information systems today, and explore some silences which form around those inhabiting particular residual categories. We argue that there is significant ethical and political work to be done in exploring residuality.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24. Bernard P. Dauenhauer (1982). Silence: The Phenomenon and Its Ontological Significance. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (4):229-230.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  25.  56
    Mark S. Muldoon (1996). Silence Revisited: Taking the Sight Out of Auditory Qualities. Review of Metaphysics 50 (2):275-298.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  4
    Guy Petitdemandge (2009). Logos, cri, silence. Archives de Philosophie 4:645-659.
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  17
    Sandra Braman (2007). When Nightingales Break the Law: Silence and the Construction of Reality. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 9 (4):281-295.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  3
    Sylvie Steinberg (2010). Quand le silence se fait : bribes de paroles de femmes sur la sexualité au xviie siècle. Clio 1 (31):79-110.
    Les historiens qui se sont intéressés à la sexualité au xviie siècle ont souvent noté qu’il était rare d’accéder à une parole féminine. Quelques bribes en subsistent pourtant, que délivrent les biographies et autobiographies spirituelles de femmes dévotes et les archives des tribunaux d’Église. À partir de cette parole enchâssée dans d’autres discours – ceux des hommes et femmes d’Église qui les recueillent, ceux des juges qui les enregistrent –, opacifiée par des visées particulières – hagiographique ou judiciaire –, censurée (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  4
    Angela Thachuk (2007). The Space in Between: Narratives of Silence and Genetic Terminations. Bioethics 21 (9):511–514.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  17
    Alice Borchard Greene (1940). The Philosophy of Silence. New York, R.R. Smith.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  29
    David Lewin (2014). Behold: Silence and Attention in Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (3):355-369.
    Educators continually ask about the best means to engage students and how best to capture attention. These concerns often make the problematic assumption that students can directly govern their own attention. In order to address the role and limits of attention in education, some theorists have sought to recover the significance of silence or mindfulness in schools, but I argue that these approaches are too simplistic. A more fundamental examination of our conceptions of identity and agency reveals a Cartesian (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  32.  80
    J. R. G. Williams (2012). Indeterminacy and Normative Silence. Analysis 72 (2):217-225.
    This paper examines two puzzles of indeterminacy. The first puzzle concerns the hypothesis that there is a unified phenomenon of indeterminacy. How are we to reconcile this with the apparent diversity of reactions that indeterminacy prompts? The second puzzle focuses narrowly on borderline cases of vague predicates. How are we to account for the lack of theoretical consensus about what the proper reaction to borderline cases is? I suggest (building on work by Maudlin) that the characteristic feature of indeterminacy is (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  33.  12
    Michael C. Rea (2011). Divine Hiddenness, Divine Silence. In Louis P. Pojman & Michael C. Rea (eds.), Philosophy of Religion: An Anthology (6th Edition). Wadsworth/Cenage 266-275.
    In the present article, he explains why divine silence poses a serious intellectual obstacle to belief in God, and then goes on to consider ways of overcoming that obstacle. After considering several ways in which divine silence might actually be beneficial to human beings, he argues that perhaps silence is nothing more or less than God’s preferred mode of interaction with creatures like us. Perhaps God simply desires communion rather than overt communication with human beings, and perhaps (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. A. J. Bruggemann, B. Wijma & K. Swahnberg (2012). Patients' Silence Following Healthcare Staff's Ethical Transgressions. Nursing Ethics 19 (6):750-763.
    The aim of this study was to examine to what extent patients remained silent to the health care system after they experienced abusive or wrongful incidents in health care. Female patients visiting a women’s clinic in Sweden (n = 530) answered the Transgressions of Ethical Principles in Health Care Questionnaire (TEP), which was constructed to measure patients’ abusive experiences in the form of staff’s transgressions of ethical principles in health care. Of all the patients, 63.6% had, at some point, experienced (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  20
    Hayden Teo & Donella Caspersz (2011). Dissenting Discourse: Exploring Alternatives to the Whistleblowing/Silence Dichotomy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 104 (2):237-249.
    In recent times, whistleblowing has become one of the most popularly debated issues of business ethics. Popular discussion has coincided with the institutionalisation of whistleblowing via legal and administrative practices, supported by the emergence of academic research in the field. However, the public practice and knowledge that has subsequently developed appears to construct a dichotomy of whistleblowing/silence ; that is, an employee elects either to ‘blow the whistle’ on organisational wrongdoing, or remain silent. We argue that this public transcript (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  36.  47
    Michael Lynch (1999). Silence in Context: Ethnomethodology and Social Theory. [REVIEW] Human Studies 22 (2-4):211-233.
    Ethnomethodologists (or at least many of them) have been reticent about their theoretical sources and methodological principles. It frequently falls to others to make such matters explicit. In this paper I discuss this silence about theory, but rather than entering the breach by specifying a set of implicit assumptions and principles, I suggest that the reticence is consistent with ethnomethodology's distinctive research 'program'. The main part of the paper describes the pedagogical exercises and forms of apprenticeship through which Garfinkel (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  37.  13
    Michelle Forrest (2013). Practising Silence in Teaching. Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (4):605-622.
    The concept ‘silence’ has diametrically opposed meanings; it connotes peace and contemplation as well as death and oblivion. Silence can also be considered a practice. There is keeping the rule of silence to still the mind and find inner truth, as well as forcibly silencing in the sense of subjugating another to one's own purposes. The concept of teaching runs the gamut between these extremes, from respectfully leading students to search and discover, to relentlessly bending them to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38.  47
    John Kleinig (2001). The Blue Wall of Silence. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (1):1-23.
    The “blue wall of silence” -- the rule that police officers will not testify against each other -- has its roots in an important associational virtue, loyalty, which, in the context of friendship and familial relations, is of central importance. This article seeks to distinguish the worthy roots of the “blue wall” from its frequent corruption in the covering up of serious criminality, and attempts to offer criteria for determining when to testify and when to respond in other ways (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  39.  9
    Kevin Aho (2015). Heidegger and Silence. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):88-91.
    This short essay offers a critical overview of David Nowell Smith's book Sounding/Silence, focusing on, what the author calls, the “ontologization of poetry” as a way to grasp Heidegger's critique of traditional aesthetics and the novel claim that the human body is already implicated in Heidegger's account of language and poetry. To this end, there is a brief discussion of Heidegger's controversial views on the human/animal relation, the connection between poetry and thinking, and the value of Heidegger's poetics for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  16
    John Trinkaus & Joseph Giacalone (2005). The Silence of the Stakeholders: Zero Decibel Level at Enron. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):237 - 248.
    While the demise of Enron has raised a number of interesting issues, such as proper governance of large corporations, and the effectiveness and efficiency of statutory direction and regulatory mechanisms, the lack of meaningful vocal stakeholder stewardship has not been one of them. While the relative “silence” of Enron’s stakeholders (watchdogs) could simply have been a communication glitch, or a temporary lapse in social morality, an understanding of hat was not said and why, could well be a significant requisite (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  41.  29
    Michelle Boulous Walker (1998). Philosophy and the Maternal Body: Reading Silence. Routledge.
    Philosophy and the Maternal Body is a fascinating exploration of an overlooked aspect of feminist thought: what is the role of maternity in philosophy and in what ways has it been used by male theorists to effectively "silence" the voices of women in philosophy? Drawing on rich examples such as Plato's allegory of the cave, Sigmund Freud and Melanie Klein's writing on the mother and the mother-daughter relationship, and the psychoanalytic and feminist insights of Irigaray and Kristeva, Michelle Boulous (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  42.  9
    Berel Lang (1996). Heidegger's Silence. Cornell University Press.
    UP. Berel Lang shows in this penetrating book how Heideggeer's own silence on the 'Jewish Question' --how (or if) the Jews were to live among the nations- ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  43.  17
    Angelo Caranfa (2006). Voices of Silence in Pedagogy: Art, Writing and Self-Encounter. Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (1):85–103.
    This article draws on the conclusion of the Commission on the Humanities in The Humanities in American Life that the aim of a liberal arts education is to foster critical reasoning through the use of language or discourse. This paper maintains that the critical method is in itself insufficient to achieve its purpose. Its failure is in its exclusion of feeling and of silence from the thinking process. Hence, the ultimate object of my analysis is to correct and to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  44.  3
    D. Hook (2011). White Privilege, Psychoanalytic Ethics, and the Limitations of Political Silence. South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (4):494-501.
    The moral and philosophical interrogation of white privilege remains an imperative in post-apartheid South Africa. Whereas the critique of whiteness involves both philosophical and psychological scrutiny, subsequent calls for white political silence and withdrawal have yet to be subjected to adequate psychological analysis. This paper offers such an analysis by questioning, firstly, the idea of appropriate emotions for white South Africans (shame, guilt, regret), posing instead the problems of mimed affect and neurotic goodness. White approaches to guilt-alleviation and political (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45.  5
    Bret W. Davis (2015). Sharing Words of Silence: Panikkar After Gadamer. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):52-68.
    This article elucidates and interpretively develops Raimon Panikkar's hermeneutics of intertraditional dialogue by way of setting it into sympathetic and critical dialogue with the predominantly intratraditional hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer. It argues that Panikkar's thought enables us not only to appreciate, but also to question the limits of the fundamental roles played by language and tradition in Gadamer's hermeneutics. Panikkar's own hermeneutical reflections arise directly out of intertraditional as well as interlinguistic experience; and they ultimately direct us toward the profoundest (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  1
    Gene Ray (2016). On the Mattering of Silence and Avowal: Joseph Beuys’ Plight and Negative Presentation in Post-1945 Visual Art. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 24 (49-50).
    Joseph Beuys’ installation Plight forcefully avows of the Nazi genocide by means of negative presentation. The work culminates a collective artistic investigation of negative sculptural strategies for representing traumatic history, opened by the Nouveaux Réalistes under the impact of Alain Resnais’ documentary film Nuit et Brouillard. This article outlines this history and analyzes Plight in the context of the ‘after Auschwitz’ crisis of representation and traditional culture theorized by Theodor W. Adorno. For Adorno, Auschwitz demonstrated threats to autonomous subjectivity posed (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  5
    Daniel Brudney (1990). Knowledge and Silence: "The Golden Bowl" and Moral Philosophy. Critical Inquiry 16 (2):397-437.
    When literary texts are included in a course on moral philosophy they tend to be classical tragedies or existentialist novels: texts filled with major moral transgressions and agonized debates over rights, wrongs, and relativism. Recently, however, the focus of much discussion on literature and moral philosophy has been Henry James’s last novel, The Golden Bowl. This ought to seem surprising. For The Golden Bowl is a quintessential Jamesian novel. Almost nothing happens. In the course of more than five hundred pages (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  48.  22
    Alex Davies (2014). How to Silence Content with Porn, Context and Loaded Questions. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (1).
    Catharine MacKinnon claimed that pornography silence's women's speech where this speech is protected by free speech legislation. MacKinnon's claim was attacked as confused because, so it seemed, pornography is not the kind of thing that can silence speech. Using ideas drawn from John Austin's account of speech acts, Rae Langton defended MacKinnon's claim against this attack by showing how speech can, in principle, be silenced by pornography. However, Langton's defence requires us to deviate from a widely held understanding (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  7
    Liz Jackson (2008). Silence, Words That Wound and Sexual Identity: A Conversation with Applebaum. Journal of Moral Education 37 (2):225-238.
    In this paper, I continue a conversation initiated by Barbara Applebaum on how to manage irreconcilable difference, harmful language or 'words that wound' and various implications of power in the classroom. Referencing emerging works on the nature of speech and silence, classroom power and queer identity, I pose three questions to Applebaum in order to continue thinking through the timely situations with which she grapples. What is the nature of reasonableness is the classroom setting? Must speech reflect power; and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50.  26
    José Medina (2004). The Meanings of Silence: Wittgensteinian Contextualism and Polyphony. Inquiry 47 (6):562 – 579.
    Radical feminists have argued that there are normative exclusions that have silenced certain voices and have rendered certain meanings unintelligible. Some Wittgensteinians (including some Wittgensteinian feminists) have argued that these radical feminists fall into a philosophical illusion by appealing to the notions of 'intelligible nonsense' and 'inexpressible meanings', an illusion that calls for philosophical therapy. In this paper I diagnose and criticize the therapeutic dilemma that results from this interpretation of Wittgenstein's contextualism. According to this dilemma, if something is meaningful, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000